Lisboa, Portugal

Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument to the Discoveries) and Doca de Belem (yacht harbor), on Rio Tejo, Lisboa, Portugal

Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument to the Discoveries) and Doca de Belem (yacht harbor), on Rio Tejo, Lisboa, Portugal

“Lisbon is the capital and the largest city of Portugal, with a population of 552,700… its urban area extends beyond the city’s administrative limits with a population of around 2.7 million people, being the 11th most populous urban area in the European Union… It is continental Europe’s westernmost capital city and its only one along the Atlantic coast. Lisbon lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the River Tagus. The westernmost areas of its metro area is the westernmost point of Continental Europe.

“Lisbon is recognized as a global city because of its importance in finance, commerce, media, entertainment, arts, international trade, education and tourism. It is one of the major economic centers on the continent, with a growing financial sector and one of the largest container ports on Europe’s Atlantic coast.

“Lisbon is one of the oldest cities in the world, and the oldest in Western Europe, predating other modern European capitals such as London, Paris and Rome by centuries. Julius Caesar made it a municipium called Felicitas Julia, adding to the name Olissipo. Ruled by a series of Gremanic tribes from the 5th century, it was captured by the Moors in the 8th century. In 1147, the Crusaders under Afonso Nenriques reconquered the city and since then it has been a major political, economic and cultural center of Portugal.” – Wikipedia

Teatro Nacional D. Maria II (The National Theatre D. Maria II) on Praça da Rossio, Lisboa, Portugal

Teatro Nacional D. Maria II (The National Theatre D. Maria II) on Praça da Rossio, Lisboa, Portugal

“Teatro Nacional D. Maria II (The National Theatre D. Maria II) is a theatre in Lisbon, Portugal. The historical theatre is one of the most prestigious Portuguese venues and is located in Praça da Rossio (Rossio Square), in the centre of the city.” – Wikipedia

Praça da Rossio viewed from R. da Condessa, Lisboa, Portugal

Praça da Rossio viewed from R. da Condessa, Lisboa, Portugal

Castelo de São Jorge overlooking Praça da Rossio, Lisboa, Portugal

Castelo de São Jorge overlooking Praça da Rossio, Lisboa, Portugal

Rua d. Augusta (main shopping street) overlooking Praça do Comércio and Statue of King José I, Lisboa, Portugal

Rua d. Augusta (main shopping street) overlooking Praça do Comércio and Statue of King José I, Lisboa, Portugal

Portuguese tile residences exterior, Lisboa, Portugal

Portuguese tile residences exterior, Lisboa, Portugal

Praça do Comércio y Ministerios, Lisboa, Portugal

Praça do Comércio y Ministerios, Lisboa, Portugal

Sidewalk cafes at Praça do Comércio, Lisboa, Portugal

Sidewalk cafes at Praça do Comércio, Lisboa, Portugal

Museu de Arqueologocia in the former Mosteiro dos Jerónimos  (Jerónimos Monastery) in the Belém neighborhood, Lisboa, Portugal

Museu de Arqueologocia in the former Mosteiro dos Jerónimos (Jerónimos Monastery) in the Belém neighborhood, Lisboa, Portugal

Contemporary architecture and shopping mall, Lisboa, Portugal

Contemporary architecture and shopping mall, Lisboa, Portugal

Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument to the Discoveries), Belém neighborhood on Rio Tejo, Lisboa, Portugal

Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument to the Discoveries), Belém neighborhood on Rio Tejo, Lisboa, Portugal

“Padrão dos Descobrimentos (Monument to the Discoveries) is a monument on the northern bank of Rio Tejo (River Tagus) estuary, in the civil parish of Santa Maria de Belém, Lisbon, Portugal. Located along the river where ships departed to explore and trade with India and Orient, the monument celebrates the Portuguese Age of Discovery (or Age of Exploration) during the 15th and 16th centuries. It was conceived in 1939 by Portuguese architect José Ângelo Cottinelli Telmo, and sculptor Leopoldo de Almeida, as a temporary beacon during the Portuguese World Fair opening in June 1940.‪ The Monument to the Discoveries represented a romanticized idealization of the Portuguese exploration that was typical of the Estado Novo regime of Antonio de Oliveira Salazar… by June 1943, the original structure was demolished after the exposition as there was no concrete formalization of the project… Between November 1958 and January 1960, the new monument was constructed in cement and rose-tinted stone (from Leiria), and the statues sculpted from limestone excavated from the region of Sintra.‪ The new project was enlarged from the original 1940 model as part of the commemorations to celebrate the fifth centennial of the death of Infante Henry the Navigator.” – Wikipedia

“Wavy Gravy” paving stone design at Praça da Rossio, Lisboa, Portugal

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