Circumambulation of the rampart walls, Saint-Malo, France

Our ship anchored at Saint-Malo, France

Our ship anchored at Saint-Malo, France

On our second day in Saint-Malo (see our previous post for an introduction to this Brittany coast medieval city that was home to French corsairs and pirates for hundreds of years), we decided to climb up the rampart walls and do a complete circumambulation of the walled city.

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of fortificaitons of Place du Quebec, Saint-Malo, France

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of fortificaitons of Place du Quebec, Saint-Malo, France

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of the English Channel from Tour Bidouane, Saint-Malo, France

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of the English Channel from Tour Bidouane, Saint-Malo, France

Built in 1689 by French King Louis XIV’s master military architect Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, the massive Fort National dungeoned fortress was primarily intended to protect Saint-Malo from the British.  Located just outside the walled city on the north, the fort is situated offshore atop a rocky outcrop and can only be reached on foot at low tide.

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of Fort National from Chateau de la Duchesse Anne, Saint-Malo, France

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of Fort National from Chateau de la Duchesse Anne, Saint-Malo, France

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of one of the towers of the 15th century Chateau de Saint-Malo, Saint-Malo, France

View from our circumambulation of the rampart walls of one of the towers of the 15th century Chateau de Saint-Malo, Saint-Malo, France

Chateau de Saint-Malo (the Castle of Saint-Malo) was built by the Dukes of Brittany for their guardianship over the city of Saint-Malo beginning in 1424.  Within the castle today is a museum chronicling the city’s history, Musee de L’Historie de Saint-Malo.  It contains information on some of Saint-Malo’s most famous residents such as Jacques Cartier and the writer Chateaubriand.

Beurre (butter) "tasting" before our luncheon at Autour du Beurre with Chef Steve Delamaire, Saint-Malo, France

Beurre (butter) “tasting” before our luncheon at Autour du Beurre with Chef Steve Delamaire, Saint-Malo, France

After our morning circumambulation of the walled city, we met some friends for lunch in La Ville Intra-Muros (the old city within the rampart walls) at Autor du Beurre.  We were very impressed by the modern decor in a 15th or 16th century building and the cuisine of Chef Steve Delamaire.  True to the restaurant’s name, there is a lot of beurre (butter).  We started our luncheon with a butter tasting! (pictured above.)  Of the eight butters — unsalted, salted, with tarragon, with garlic, with grey sea salt, with pimentón, etc., our table’s favorite was the butter with grey sea salt.  Quite an interesting way to get into the local Brittany food and culture.

Main course of lobster tail at our special lobster menu luncheon at Autour du Beurre, Saint-Malo, France

Main course of lobster tail at our special lobster menu luncheon at Autour du Beurre, Saint-Malo, France

We couldn’t pass up the all lobster multi-course luncheon.  Each course presented part of the lobster in a different preparation.  Pictured above is the lobster tail served back in its shell as the entree.

One of the few remaining half-timbered "bridges" connecting old buildings, Saint-Malo, France

One of the few remaining half-timbered “bridges” connecting old buildings, Saint-Malo, France

When we took the tender back to the ship, anchored in the harbor (see top photograph in this blog post), looking back at the walled city it was quite a sight to see all the anchored boats sitting on the sand at low tide (10+ meters, or 33 feet twice-daily rise and fall of the water level).

Boats in the sand by La Ville Intra-Muros (Walled City), Saint-Malo, France, viewed from the west at low tide

Boats in the sand by La Ville Intra-Muros (Walled City), Saint-Malo, France, viewed from the west at low tide

 

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