The Freedom Trail (Part 3), Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Faneuil Hall,

Faneuil Hall, “the Cradle of Liberty”, on The Freedom Trail, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Often referred to as “the home of free speech” and “the Cradle of Liberty”, Faneuil Hall was one of America’s first public meeting venues. Built by wealthy merchant Peter Faneuil — who is buried in the Granary Burying Ground featured in Part 1 of our blog posts on The Freedom Trail — in 1741, this imposing structure is the place where the Sons of Liberty proclaimed their dissent against Royal oppression. Faneuil Hall has served as an open forum meeting hall and marketplace for more than 270 years and has continued to provide a forum for debate on the most consequential issues of the day.

Hot buttered lobster rolls and fresh shrimp for sale in Faneuil Hall market, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Hot buttered lobster rolls and fresh shrimp for sale in Faneuil Hall market, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

The first floor served as a marketplace for the local townspeople to sell their goods. Today, Boston National Historic Park operates the Faneuil Hall Visitor Center and the ground floor is filled with both locals and tourists shopping in the marketplace.

Boston Chowda restaurant stall in Faneuil Hall market, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Boston Chowda restaurant stall in Faneuil Hall market, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

In addition to fresh Maine lobsters, lobster rolls and lobster bisque, shoppers can also purchase lobster mac and cheese pies — at the Boston Chowda stall in Faneuil Hall in Boston.

Lobster mac and cheese pies at Boston Chowda in Faneuil Hall, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Lobster mac and cheese pies at Boston Chowda in Faneuil Hall, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Built around 1680, the Paul Revere House is the oldest remaining structure in downtown Boston and the only home on the Freedom Trail.  Paul Revere purchased this former merchant’s dwelling in 1770, when he was 35 years old.  He and his family lived here when Revere made his famous messenger ride on the night of April 18-19, 1775.

Paul Revere House (circa 1680), the oldest remaining structure in downtown Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Paul Revere House (circa 1680), the oldest remaining structure in downtown Boston, Massachusetts, USA

After serving as a rooming house and tenement for some of the thousands of Irish, Jewish and Italian immigrants who lived in the neighborhood, the building was restored in the early 20th century and opened to the public in April 1908.  Today the Paul Revere House serves as a museum and historic site where visitors can learn about Paul Revere’s life and times and experience what home life was like in 17th and 18th century Boston.

Paul Revere statue in Paul Revere Mall behind Old North Church, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Paul Revere statue in Paul Revere Mall behind Old North Church, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

“Listen my children and you shall hear of the midnight ride of Paul Revere…”  With these words, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow immortalized the Old North Church and Paul Revere in American folklore.

Old North Church, the oldest church building in Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Old North Church, the oldest church building in Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Visiting the oldest church building in the city of Boston gives one the opportunity to sit in the same box pews owned by colonial congregants.  It was from here that Paul Revere set out on his famous ride — “one if by land, and two if by sea” — on April 18, 1775, that ignited the American Revolution.

Interior of Old North Church, from which Paul Revere began his midnight ride to warn the citizenry of Boston on 18 April 1775, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Interior of Old North Church, from which Paul Revere began his midnight ride to warn the citizenry of Boston on 18 April 1775, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

The Old North Church is still an active Episcopal congregation and one of the most visited historic sited in Boston. 

Beautiful interior stairway in Old North Church, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Beautiful interior stairway in Old North Church, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

The Freedom Trail continues north through the city of Boston and across the Inner Harbor to include four last sites:  Copp’s Hill Burying Ground, USS Constitution “Old Ironsides”, USS Constitution Museum and Bunker Hill Monument — points that we missed due to time constraints.

3 thoughts on “The Freedom Trail (Part 3), Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s