Boone Hall Plantation and Gardens, Mount Pleasant, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Carriage entrance to Boone Hall Plantation and Gardens (dating back to 1681) in Mount Pleasant, adjacent to Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Carriage entrance to Boone Hall Plantation and Gardens (dating back to 1681) in Mount Pleasant, adjacent to Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Boone Hall Plantation and Gardens is an antebellum era plantation located in Mount Pleasant, Charleston County, South Carolina, U.S.A., and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

A sole butterfly leading the way to the mansion at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

A sole butterfly leading the way to the mansion at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

The plantation includes a large Colonial Revival plantation house (1933–35) that replaces the lost original house on the site, a number of slave cabins or cottages (which were occupied by sharecroppers well into the 20th century), several flower gardens, and the historic “Avenue of Oaks” (pictured above), a nearly one-mile (1.6 km) drive up to the house with southern live oaks on either side, originally planted in 1743.

Boone Hall Plantation antibellum style mansion (1936), Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Boone Hall Plantation antibellum style mansion (1936), Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Spanish moss is a flowering plant that grows upon larger trees, commonly the Southern Live Oak or Bald Cypress in the southeastern United States from Texas and Florida north to southern Arkansas and Virginia. 

Spanish moss on trees at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Spanish moss on trees at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Boone Hall Plantation is one of America’s oldest still working plantations, continually growing crops for over 320 years.  Boone Hall Farms is the present day agricultural arm that operates this part of the plantation.  April to June, strawberries are the centerpiece at Boone Hall Farms.  The annual Lowcountry Strawberry Festival caps off the peak of each season and thousands of pounds of strawberries are picked from Boone Hall Farms U-Pick fields.

Old farm equipment at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Old farm equipment at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

On the grounds today, besides the house, sit nine of the original slave cabins which date back to 1790-1810, a smoke house dating back to 1750, the Cotton Gin house (1853) and the grand Avenue of Oaks that was created in 1743 and completed in 1843.  Boone Hall Plantation today spans 738 acres of lively, Lowcountry landscape that also includes seasonal crop fields, naturally preserved wetlands, creeks, and ponds.

Horse corral at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Horse corral at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

The plantation originally grew rice (a crop the early slaves brought over to the Colonies from Africa) and then cotton (devastated in the late 1800s by the boll weevil bug) before switching to pecan trees (the plantation had the largest pecan tree farm in the US just over one hundred years ago).

Migrating geese in front of remaining pecan trees at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Migrating geese in front of remaining pecan trees at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Currently, the plantation’s spring planting annually includes tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, watermelons, sweet corn, and other produce that is part of the Boone Hall Farms farm-to-table program that is featured in over 35 Lowcountry businesses and restaurants.  These crops are harvested throughout the summer months during the peak of the South Carolina growing season.

Cornfield at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Cornfield at Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston, South Carolina, USA


One thought on “Boone Hall Plantation and Gardens, Mount Pleasant, Charleston, South Carolina, USA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s