Guayaquil, Equador

Catedral Metropolitana de Guayaquil (Metropolitan Cathedral of Guayaquil), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Catedral Metropolitana de Guayaquil (Metropolitan Cathedral of Guayaquil), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Guayaquil is Ecuador’s largest city as well as its main port.  This vibrant economic center is also the primary gateway to the Galapagos Islands(part of Ecuador).  The Malecon 2000, a waterfront promenade, is a wonderful renovation of the old, gritty Simon Bolivar boardwalk.  Considered a model of urban renewal, this excellently executed project incorporates museums and shopping malls, open space and restaurants, theaters and gardens.

Interior (renovated in 1978), Catedral Metropolitana de Guayaquil (Metropolitan Cathedral of Guayaquil), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Interior (renovated in 1978), Catedral Metropolitana de Guayaquil (Metropolitan Cathedral of Guayaquil), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Catedral Metropolitana de Guayaquil (Metropolitan Cathedral of Guayaquil) is a Neo-Gothic cathedral that dates back to 1547.  It was rebuilt in 1948 after the original structure was destroyed by fire, as were most of the city’s original wooden structures.  It was completely renovated in 1978.  The facade is ornate but the interior is modern and quite simple with a high-vaulted ceiling, marble altar, and stained-glass windows that are works of art.

Equestrian statue of Simon Bolivar (1888) in Seminario Park, Guayaquil, Ecuador

Equestrian statue of Simon Bolivar (1888) in Seminario Park, Guayaquil, Ecuador

Simón Bolívar — in full Simón José Antonio de la Santísima Trinidad Bolívar y Palacios — (24 July 1783 – 17 December 1830), was a Venezuelan military and political leader who played an instrumental role in the establishment of Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Peru and Colombia as sovereign states, independent of Spanish rule. — Wikipedia

Typical colonial-style building, Guayaquil, Ecuador

Typical colonial-style building, Guayaquil, Ecuador

 

 

Typical colonial neoclassical-style building from the late 19th century, Guayaquil, Ecuador

Typical colonial neoclassical-style building from the late 19th century, Guayaquil, Ecuador

 

 

Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), a 26-block riverfront walkway, Guayaquil, Ecuador

Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), a 26-block riverfront walkway, Guayaquil, Ecuador

Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000) is a 26-block riverfront walkway that represents one of Guayaquil’s most beloved attractions — in an area that was neglected for years.  Malecon 2000 spans 1.6 miles (2.5 km) along the Guauas River.

Looking north to the hillside homes from Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Looking north to the hillside homes from Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Considered a successful model of urban regeneration at global standards, the walkway and attractions were declared a healthy public space by the Pan-American Organization of Health (POH) and the World Health Organization (WHO).  The area is very secure for both locals and tourists to stroll and visit the attractions.

"The Rotunda", a monument built as a Memorial of the famous interview between Simon Bolivar and Jose de San Martin in Guayaquil on 26-27 July 1882, on the Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

“The Rotunda”, a monument built as a Memorial of the famous interview between Simon Bolivar and Jose de San Martin in Guayaquil on 26-27 July 1882, on the Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

“The Rotunda” is a monument built as a Memorial of the famous interview between Simon Bolivar and Jose de San Martin in Guayaquil on 26-27 July 1822, on the Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000).  The work was made by the Catalan artist Jose Antonio Homs.  The Hemicycle, columns, decorations and reliefs were entrusted to the Spanish Sculptor Juan Rovira in 1927 and the surrounding urns to the Italian sculptor Emilio Soro.  The work was completed in May 1938 when the sculptures were installed.

“Bolívar launched outright independence campaigns in Venezuela and Ecuador, and these campaigns were concluded with the victory at the Battle of Carabobo, after which he triumphantly entered Caracas on 29 June 1821.  On 7 September 1821 the Gran Colombia (a state covering much of modern Colombia, Panama, Venezuela, Ecuador, northern Peru, and northwest of Brazil) was created, with Bolívar as president and Francisco de Paula Santander as vice president.  Bolivar followed with the Battle of Bombona and the Battle of Pichincha, after which Bolivar entered Quito on 16 June 1822. 

“On 26 and 27 July 1822, Bolívar held the Guayaquil Conference with the Argentinian General José de San Martín, who had received the title of Protector of Peruvian Freedom in August 1821 after having partially liberated Peru from the Spanish.  Thereafter, Bolívar took over the task of fully liberating Peru.  The Peruvian congress named him dictator of Peru on 10 February 1824, which allowed Bolívar to reorganize completely the political and military administration.  Assisted by Antonio José de Sucre, Bolívar decisively defeated the Spanish cavalry at the Battle of Junín on 6 August 1824. Sucre destroyed the still numerically superior remnants of the Spanish forces at Ayacucho on 9 December 1824. 

“On 6 August 1825, at the Congress of Upper Peru, the “Republic of Bolivia” was created, and voted Bolivar president.  Bolívar is thus one of the few men to have a country named after him.” — quoted from Wikipedia

Holiday decorations and city street, viewd from the Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Holiday decorations and city street, viewed from the Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

 

Colorful hillside homes viewd from the Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

Colorful hillside homes viewed from the Malecon Simon Bolivar (Malecon 2000), Guayaquil, Ecuador

 

Contemporary architecture, Guayaquil, Ecuador

Contemporary architecture, Guayaquil, Ecuador

 

4 thoughts on “Guayaquil, Equador

  1. Hi Rich and Robin, For the past few days, we’ve wondered where you have been. We can now see that you are in another beautiful place. Your travels have been extensive in 2015. When will you come home?  Donna

    Like

  2. Richard, Thanx for your wonderful fotos… your captions are informative \ best wishes for holidays …Looking forward to returning in Buenos Aires …jerry

    Like

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