A walking tour of the historic and political heart of Buenos Aires, Argentina

Panorama of the historic and political heart of Buenos Aires, around Plaza de Mayo (May Square), Argentina

Panorama of the historic and political heart of Buenos Aires, around Plaza de Mayo (May Square), Argentina

 

“Buenos Aires, Argentina’s big, cosmopolitan capital, is known for its European atmosphere, passionate tango and vibrant nightlife.  Its center is the 16th-century Plaza de Mayo, lined with stately buildings including Casa Rosada, the iconic, balconied presidential palace.  In Microcentro, Florida Street is the main shopping thoroughfare, leading to Plaza San Martín, a busy park that was once the site of a bullfighting arena.” — Wikipedia

 

Cabildo, a colonial-style building, was the original seat of city government established by the Spaniards, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Cabildo, a colonial-style building, was the original seat of city government established by the Spaniards, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

The Buenos Aires Cabildo is a small, white, colonial-style building with a central bell tower and was the original seat of city government established by the Spaniards.  The building was completed in 1751, but parts of it were demolished to create space for Avenida de Mayo and Diagonal Sur in the late 1800s and early 1900s.  Meetings related to Argentina’s declaration of independence against Spain were held here.  The Cabildo is the only remaining government building on the Plaza de Mayo dating back to colonial times.  Today the building is a small, informal museum with artifacts form the colonial period.

Banco de la Nacion Argentina (National Bank of Argentina), Buenos Aires, Argentina

Banco de la Nacion Argentina (National Bank of Argentina), Buenos Aires, Argentina

View of La Casa Rosada ("The Pink House") -- the Government House -- from the Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

View of La Casa Rosada (“The Pink House”) — the Government House — from the Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina

“La Casa Rosada (The Pink House) is the executive mansion and office of the President of Argentina. The palatial mansion is known officially as Casa de Gobierno, (“House of Government” or “Government House”). Normally, the President lives at the Quinta de Olivos, the official residence of the President of Argentina, which is located in Olivos, Buenos Aires Province. The characteristic color of the Casa Rosada is baby pink, and is considered one of the most emblematic buildings in Buenos Aires. The building also houses a museum, which contains objects relating to former presidents of Argentina.” – Wikipedia

Chalk figures at Plaza de Mayo memorializing the 26 people killed in the December 2001 anti-government uprising, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Chalk figures at Plaza de Mayo memorializing the 26 people killed in the December 2001 anti-government uprising, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

The chalk figures in the photograph, above, at Plaza de Mayo memorialize the 26 people killed in the December 2001 uprising against the government of President Fernando de la Rúa, who had failed to contain the economic crisis that was going through its third year of recession.  Following the resignation of the Economy Minister on December 29, 2001, President De la Rúa resigned on December 20, 2001.  “The situation on Plaza de Mayo (right in front of the Casa Rosoda, the Presidential Palace) was still too violent for De la Rúa to leave by car to his official residence at Olivos.  Thus, the President’s security detail decided to take him out of the Casa Rosada on board an Air Force helicopter.  The images of De la Rúa’s ‘escape’ by helicopter were broadcast throughout the country.  The violence slowly abated.  By the end of the day, 26 people had died, five of them in Buenos Aires.  The President Pro-Tempore of the Senate, Ramón Puerta, took over as Interim President, until Congress could appoint a successor to De la Rúa.” – Wikipedia

 

La Casa Rosada ("The Pink House") -- the Presidential Palace, Buenos Aires, Argentina

La Casa Rosada (“The Pink House”) — the Presidential Palace, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Centro (Central district) street, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Centro (Central district) street, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

 

Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral), Argentina

Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral), Argentina

 

“Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral) is an architectural masterpiece and the main Catholic church in Argentina’s capital city. In 1580, Buenos Aires founder Juan de Garay designated a plot of land for the city’s first major church.  Today’s cathedral stands on the same plot.  It was built by European architects using a fusion of 18th- and 19th-century architectural styles.  The cathedral’s impressive façade includes 12 Hellenic columns, which represent the 12 apostles.  Above the columns is a carved mural that portrays the reunion of Joseph with his brothers and his father, Jacob. inside are tall arcaded aisles, tombs, frescoes and decorative furnishings, [including] the ornate marble mausoleum of General Jóse de San Martín.  He is a national hero and led revolutions against Spanish rule in Argentina and other South American nations.  The tomb also houses the remains of Juan Gregorio de las Heras and Tomás Guido, two notable generals from the Argentine War of Independence.” – www.expedia.com

 

Inside the Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral), Argentina

Inside the Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral), Argentina

 

A memorial to the Jews of Argentina who perished in the Holocasut in the Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral), Argentina

A memorial to the Jews of Argentina who perished in the Holocasut in the Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires Metropolitan Cathedral), Argentina

 

 

The ornate marble mausoleum of General Jóse de San Martín who led revolutions against Spanish rule in Argentina, Chile and Peru, Buenos Aires Cathedral, Argentina

The ornate marble mausoleum of General Jóse de San Martín who led revolutions against Spanish rule in Argentina, Chile and Peru, Buenos Aires Cathedral, Argentina

 

One thought on “A walking tour of the historic and political heart of Buenos Aires, Argentina

  1. You must have gotten to the Central St. very early in the morning?

    Were mothers standing together in protest at the Plaza de Mayo?

    Like

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