Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires (Latin American Art Museum of Buenos Aires), Argentina

Exterior entrance to the MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Exterior entrance to the MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

“We all know Buenos Aires is famous for its cafes, nightlife, tango and soccer.  But it’s also a city with a rich history and a thriving arts scene.  Dotting Buenos Aires’ barrios is a fascinating collection of museums and galleries that showcase the city’s heritage, historical figures and love of the arts.  The popular barrio of Palermo is home to one of the city’s most popular and most visited museums/galleries, MALBA (malba.org.ar).  The Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires (Latin American Art Museum of Buenos Aires) is the place to enjoy permanent and temporary exhibitions of 20th-century art.  Find permanent collections by Argentines Emilio Pettoruti, Roberto Matta and Jorge de la Vega.  These are complemented by traveling exhibitions by internationally famed artists, including Andy Warhol, Mario Testino and Yayoi Kusama. Besides the collections, the exhibitions take place in an impressive building, complete with a cinema, cafe and bookstore.” – http://www.gringobuenosaires.com

 

Entrance to the permanent gallery collection, “XX century Latin American art” at the MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Entrance to the permanent gallery collection, “XX century Latin American art” at the MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

MALBA’s permanent gallery collection, “XX century Latin American art” has a unique heritage in the world, as it brings together works of the major trends and movements that characterize the art of the region, from Mexico and the Caribbean to Argentina.

 

Diego Rivera (Mexico, 1886 - 1957), "Portrait of Sir Ramon Gomez de la Serna",  MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Diego Rivera (Mexico, 1886 – 1957), “Portrait of Sir Ramon Gomez de la Serna”, MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

“The Latin American Art Museum of Buenos Aires [was] created by Argentine businessman Eduardo Costantini [and] the museum is operated by the not-for-profit Fundación MALBA – Costantini, and was inaugurated on September 21, 2001.  The institution was organized around the Costantini Collection, and has continued to expand its selection of works from modern artists from across Latin America. It also maintains a dynamic cultural center, which serves to constantly updates art and film exhibitions and develops cultural activities.  The museum welcomes over a million visitors annually, and is also sustained by over 1,400 active patrons.” — Wikipedia

 

Alejandro Xul Solar (Argentina, 1887 - 1963), "Troncos" (Tree Trunks), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Alejandro Xul Solar (Argentina, 1887 – 1963), “Troncos” (Tree Trunks), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Alejandro Xul Solar (Argentina, 1887 - 1963), "Pareja" (Couple), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Alejandro Xul Solar (Argentina, 1887 – 1963), “Pareja” (Couple), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

“The Museum design was made through an open call contest within the “Bienal Internacional de Buenos Aires”.  450 proposals from 45 countries were presented.  The selection was left to an international jury of architects and the first prize was awarded to three young Argentinian architects: Gaston Atelman, Martin Fourcade and Alfredo Tapia.  The mission of the MALBA is to collect, preserve, research and promote Latin American art from the onset of the 20th century to the present.  This also involves educating the public to foster their knowledge in Latin American artists, in the diversity of cultural and artistic holdings in this region, sharing such responsibility both with the national and the international community.  The building project was executed by AFT Architects, a renowned Argentine architectural firm.” — Wikipedia

 

Miguel Covarrubias (Mexico, 1904 - 1957), "George Gershwin, An American in Paris",  MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Miguel Covarrubias (Mexico, 1904 – 1957), “George Gershwin, An American in Paris”, MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Jorge de la Vega (Argentina, 1930 - 1971), "El dia ilustrisimo" (The Illustrious Day),  MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Jorge de la Vega (Argentina, 1930 – 1971), “El dia ilustrisimo” (The Illustrious Day), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

A selection from the permanent gallery collection, “XX century Latin American art” at the MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

A selection from the permanent gallery collection, “XX century Latin American art” at the MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Francis Alys, "Don't Cross the Bridge Before You Get to the River" 2008, (temporary exhibition), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Francis Alys, “Don’t Cross the Bridge Before You Get to the River” 2008, (temporary exhibition), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

“Francis Alÿs (born 1959, Antwerp) is a Belgian-born, Mexico-based artist.  His work emerges in the interdisciplinary space of art, architecture, and social practice.  After leaving behind his formal training as an architect and relocated to Mexico City, he has created a diverse body of artwork that explores urbanity, spatial justice, and land-based poetics.  Employing a broad range of media from painting to performance, his works examine the tension between politics and poetics, individual action and impotence.” – Wikipedia

 

Francis Alys, "A Story of Navigation" (temporary exhibition), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Francis Alys, “A Story of Navigation” (temporary exhibition), MALBA modern art museum, Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

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