Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

Welcome to the planet MARS -- oops, it's actually the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

Welcome to the planet MARS — oops, it’s actually the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

 

Lanzarote, of volcanic origin, is the easternmost of the Canary Islands (belonging to Spain) about 78 miles (125 kilometers) from the coast of Morocco and Western Sahara.  The island emerged about 15 million years ago as a result of fiery volcanic eruptions (there are 36 volcanoes on the island, one of which remains active).

Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park) is a Spanish national park in the southwestern part of the island of Lanzarote, Canary Islands.  The parkland is entirely made up of volcanic soil. Alfred Wegener’s study of the island while visiting in 1912 showed how it fitted in with his theory of continental drift.  The island, along with others, emerged after the break-up of the African and the American continental plates.

 

The most popular way to tour the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park) is by camel, Lanzarote, Canary Islands

The most popular way to tour the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park) is by camel, Lanzarote, Canary Islands

 

In 1993, UNESCO designated a Biosphere reserve covering the whole of Lanzarote.  The national park is one of the core areas of the biosphere reserve.  Access to the park by the public is strictly regulated to protect the delicate flora and fauna.  There are one or two footpaths, and a popular short route where one can visit by camel.

 

Red lava rock:ash indicates the presence of iron in the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

Red lava rock/ash indicates the presence of iron in the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

 

Camels discharging their passengers after touring the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

Camels discharging their passengers after touring the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

 

“The greatest recorded eruptions occurred between 1730 and 1736.  The volcanic activity continues as the surface temperature in the core ranges from 100 to 600°C at the depth of 13 metres (43 feet), which is demonstrated by pouring water into the ground, resulting in a geyser of steam which is an attraction for tourists.  There is only one active volcano, Timanfaya volcano which the park is named after.” – Wikipedia

 

A rare instance of vegetation in the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

A rare instance of vegetation in the volcanic landscape of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

 

The road form the town of Yaiza to Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park) -- they could have filmed part of Star Wars here!; Lanzarote, Canary Islands

The road form the town of Yaiza to Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park) — they could have filmed part of Star Wars here!; Lanzarote, Canary Islands

 

Much of Lanzarote, particularly Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), reminded us of the black lava landscape of the biggest Hawaiian island, Hawai’i.

 

Caldera, volcanic mountain, and black lava at Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park) -- they could have filmed part of Star Wars here!; Lanzarote, Canary Islands

Caldera, volcanic mountain, and black lava at Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park) — they could have filmed part of Star Wars here!; Lanzarote, Canary Islands

 

3 thoughts on “Parque Nacional de Timanfaya (Timanfaya National Park), Lanzarote, Canary Islands

  1. We want to know if you guys rode the camels? Did the Easter bunny find you this morning?

    Myra Feiger myra@feiger.com 510.599.3760 Cell 510.886.0900 Home

    Sent from my iPhone

    On Mar 27, 2016, at 10:05 AM, Where in the world is Riccardo? wrote:

    WordPress.com richardcedwards posted: ” Lanzarote, of volcanic origin, is the easternmost of the Canary Islands (belonging to Spain) about 78 miles (125 kilometers) from the coast of Morocco and Western Sahara. The island emerged about 15 million years ago as a result of fiery volcan”

    Like

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