Hamburg, Germany

Rathaus (City Hall) -- built 1886 to 1897 -- dominates the center of Hamburg, Germany, where it is situated on a large plaza, adjacent to the Alsterakaden Canal, connecting the Binnenalster Lake with the Norderelbe (Northern Elbe) River

Rathaus (City Hall) — built 1886 to 1897 — dominates the center of Hamburg, Germany, where it is situated on a large plaza, adjacent to the Alsterakaden Canal, connecting the Binnenalster Lake with the Norderelbe (Northern Elbe) River

 

Since its origins as a moated castle between the Alster and Elber rivers, the “free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg” has embraced seafaring commerce.  The early merchants’ wealth and power is evidenced in the majestic, late Gothic Renaissance Rathaus (City Hall) and in the nicely restored half-timbered merchant houses along Delchstrasse.  They stand in sharp contrast to the narrow alley quarters of the “Krameramtsstuben” district.  The Planten un Blomen (Botanical Garden) is in the heart of the city and is quite spectacular. The city has grown considerably since World War II with a population now totaling 1.8 million, making it Germany’s second largest city and eighth largest in the European Union, with a total population of about 5 million in the metropolitan region.

 

Hauptkirche St. Michaelis (Saint Michael’s Church) was originally constructed between 1906 and 1912, severely damaged in World War II and completely rebuilt in the early 1950s, Hamburg, Germany

Hauptkirche St. Michaelis (Saint Michael’s Church) was originally constructed between 1906 and 1912, severely damaged in World War II and completely rebuilt in the early 1950s, Hamburg, Germany

 

Hauptkirche St. Michaelis (Saint Michael’s Church) is well known for its four organs, the larger one pictured here, with two on the sides of the transcept and one with the pipes in the ceiling, sounding like music from heaven, Hamburg, Germany

Hauptkirche St. Michaelis (Saint Michael’s Church) is well known for its four organs, the larger one pictured here, with two on the sides of the transept and one with the pipes in the ceiling, sounding like music from heaven, Hamburg, Germany

 

Mockenberg Strasse, one of the main shopping streets that terminates at the Rathaus Plaza, Hamburg, Germany

Mockenberg Strasse, one of the main shopping streets that terminates at the Rathaus Plaza, Hamburg, Germany

 

“Before the 1871 Unification of Germany, [Hamburg] was a fully soverign state.  Prior to the constitutional changes in 1919, the civic republic was ruled by a class of hereditary grand burghers or Henseaten.  Hamburg is a transport hub, being the 2nd largest port in Europe [after Rotterdam], and is an affluent city in Europe. It has become a media and industrial centre, with plants and facilities belonging to Airbus, Blohm+ Voss and Aurubis.  The radio and television broadcaster Norddeutscher Rundfunk and publishers such as Gruner + Jahr and Spiegel-Verlag are pillars of the important media industry in Hamburg.  Hamburg has been an important financial centre for centuries, and is the seat of the world’s second oldest bank, Berenberg Bank. The city is a notable tourist destination for both domestic and overseas visitors; it ranked 16th in the world for livability in 2015.” – Wikipedia

 

Retail shops, offices and apartments in modern buildings overlooking Binnenalster Lake, Hamburg, Germany

Retail shops, offices and apartments in modern buildings overlooking Binnenalster Lake, Hamburg, Germany

 

No, its not Venice in Amsterdam, but Venice in Hamburg, often called the “Venice of the North” (move over, Amsterdam and Bruges…) – lots of cafes and restaurants under the arches, overlooking the canal, Hamburg, Germany

No, its not Venice in Amsterdam, but Venice in Hamburg, often called the “Venice of the North” (move over, Amsterdam and Bruges…) – lots of cafes and restaurants under the arches, overlooking the canal, Hamburg, Germany

 

The view from our canal boat as we sailed from Binnenalster (Inner, and smaller Alster) Lake to Aussenalster (Outer, and larger, Alster) Lake and the interconnected canals in the Uhlenhorst neighborhood, Hamburg, Germany

The view from our canal boat as we sailed from Binnenalster (Inner, and smaller Alster) Lake to Aussenalster (Outer, and larger, Alster) Lake and the interconnected canals in the Uhlenhorst neighborhood, Hamburg, Germany

 

Luxurious homes (mansions) on a small pond off one of the numerous canals in the district northeast of Aussenalster (Outer, and larger, Alster) Lake, Hamburg, Germany

Luxurious homes (mansions) on a small pond off one of the numerous canals in the district northeast of Aussenalster (Outer, and larger, Alster) Lake, Hamburg, Germany

 

One of the few surviving nineteenth century office buildings in the Altstadt District (central downtown), Hamburg, Germany

One of the few surviving nineteenth century office buildings in the Altstadt District (central downtown), Hamburg, Germany

 

One day a small group of us had the opportunity to visit the Airbus manufacturing and assembly plant outside of the city of Hamburg for a tour of the manufacturing and assembly plants.  The German Headquarters employs approximately 13,000 workers.  The facility is very modern and assembles the Airbus 320 family aircraft (models 318, 319, 320, and 321) along with the manufacture of two sections of the fuselage of the jumbo, double-decked Airbus 380 (the largest planes in the world), which are shipped for assembly to Toulouse, France.  It is interesting that the fully assembled A-380s are then flown (under their own power) back to Hamburg where they undergo final testing and then the aircraft exteriors are painted and the planes delivered to customers.  Due to strict security (we each had to bring our passports and go through a screening), no photographs were permitted to be taken at the facility.   😦

 

 

2 thoughts on “Hamburg, Germany

  1. In addition to the beauty visually from your photos your descriptions are always so wonderful to read… truly a history lesson, a wonderful travel guide and even more. Thank you for sharing your journey.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My one memory of Hamburg at age 21, While traveling with my mother and identical twin sister on the way to Copenhagen. We could not find a suitable room. My aunt (lovely but sure of her self) went to the fanciest hotel and “greased the palm” of the desk clerk with $20 (a large tip in 1958). We wound up with a two bedroom two bath wedding suite. There was this funny contraption in the bathroom like a low toilet on the floor. I cranked the handle (hard) and we had Niagara Falls raining on us until the hotel plumber arrived. Never again. Ron

    Liked by 1 person

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