Eat local: traversing the Kiel Canal (connecting the North Sea to the Baltic Sea), Germany

The freshwater Kiel Canal saves considerable time going from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea (not sailing through the rough waters off the Jutland Peninsula) across northern Germany (from near Hamburg to Kiel)

The freshwater Kiel Canal saves considerable time going from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea (not sailing through the rough waters off the Jutland Peninsula) across northern Germany (from near Hamburg to Kiel)

 

Originally constructed between 1887 and 1895 and named in honor of Kaiser Wilheim, the Kiel Canal (Nord-Ostsee Kanal), which links the North Sea at Brunsbuttel (near Hamburg) with the Baltic Sea at Kiel-Holtenau, is the world’s busiest artificial waterway.  Its initial purpose was to facilitate movement of the German fleet.  Although the canal is just a distance of about 62 miles (100 kilometers) in length, it saves roughly 250 nautical miles (460 kilometers) for ships and small or vessels moving between the two bodies of water.  Entrance is gained at a lock at either end, with small boats and ships often sharing passage.  Expanded to a depth of 36 feet (11 meters) and a depth of 328 feet (100 meters), the canal accommodates fairly large vessels, although megaships and tankers must take the longer route around the Jutland Peninsula.

 

A hotel and homes along the side of the Kiel Canal, Germany

A hotel and homes along the side of the Kiel Canal, Germany

 

A railroad bridge, one of several crossings of the canal (the automobile-truck bridges are free), Kiel Canal, Germany

A railroad bridge, one of several crossings of the canal (the automobile-truck bridges are free), Kiel Canal, Germany

 

Trivia about the Kiel Canal:

  • It took 9,000 workers eight years to dig the Kiel Canal.
  • Though originally named the Kaiser-Wilhelm Canal, Germans used to refer to it as the Nord-Ostsee Kanal.
  • During 2015, 88 ships passed through the Kiel Canal every day – a total of 32,091 vessels for the year.
  • Though there are two locks in the canal (at either end), these were designed mainly to protect the structure against movements of the tides.

 

 

Close-up of the railroad bridge crossing the Kiel Canal, Germany

Close-up of the railroad bridge crossing the Kiel Canal, Germany

 

An appetizer of homemade crab cakes, asparagus, mache and tomatoes for a dinner party in our apartment on the ship for friends while transiting the Kiel Canal, Germany

An appetizer of homemade crab cakes, asparagus, mache and tomatoes for a dinner party in our apartment on the ship for friends while transiting the Kiel Canal, Germany

 

The entrée, prepared by our co-hosts, of filet mignon with wild mushrooms and a Cabernet Sauvignon sauce with Dauphinoise potatoes & haricot verts for a dinner party in our apartment on the ship for friends while transiting the Kiel Canal, Germany

The entrée, prepared by our co-hosts, of filet mignon with wild mushrooms and a Cabernet Sauvignon sauce with Dauphinoise potatoes & haricot verts for a dinner party in our apartment on the ship for friends while transiting the Kiel Canal, Germany

 

The dessert was a chocolate-caramel tarte based on a Parisian family recipe from our friend, Paule, for a dinner party in our apartment on the ship for friends while transiting the Kiel Canal, Germany

The dessert was a chocolate-caramel tarte based on a Parisian family recipe from our friend, Paule, for a dinner party in our apartment on the ship for friends while transiting the Kiel Canal, Germany

 

2 thoughts on “Eat local: traversing the Kiel Canal (connecting the North Sea to the Baltic Sea), Germany

  1. Glad to see you haven’t forgotten how to cook with all those beautiful and artistic dishes you have been posting from your travels. Pretty yacht harbor.
    Sally

    Like

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