Eat local: “A Cooking Day in Rome”, Roma, Italy

Herbs, knives and utensils for our class at Chef David’s apartment-classroom in Roma, Italy, though his program, “A Cooking Day in Rome”

Herbs, knives and utensils for our class at Chef David’s apartment-classroom in Roma, Italy, though his program, “A Cooking Day in Rome”

 

The four of us visiting Roma had made previous arrangements to meet a professional chef for a morning of shopping at a local market and then a hands-on class where we would prepare several courses and then eat what we had cooked for a late lunch.  We met Chef David Sgueglia della Marra at the Pantheon early in the morning and then walked through his neighborhood to Campo de Fiore where there is an open air food market in the mornings.  Chef David purchased fruits and vegetables at the market and then we headed east to his apartment where our cooking class was held.

 

An overview of the open air daily food market in Campo de Fiore, Roma, Italy

An overview of the open air daily food market in Campo de Fiore, Roma, Italy

 

We bought tomatoes and green zucchini with flowers at the market in Campo de Fiore, Roma, Italy

We bought tomatoes and green zucchini with flowers at the market in Campo de Fiore, Roma, Italy

 

The fresh fruit looked terrific at the market in Campo de Fiore, Roma, Italy

The fresh fruit looked terrific at the market in Campo de Fiore, Roma, Italy

 

Chef David Sgueglia della Marra, founder of the “A Cooking Day in Rome” program, working with his students on whipped cream for our dessert

Chef David Sgueglia della Marra, founder of the “A Cooking Day in Rome” program, working with his students on whipped cream for our dessert

 

Before we each made a dough ball of pasta and then kneaded it and rolled it out through the pasta machine, we got instruction from Chef David on how to mix the water with the 00 Durum Wheat flour to make the ideal Italian pasta dough

Before we each made a dough ball of pasta and then kneaded it and rolled it out through the pasta machine, we got instruction from Chef David on how to mix the water with the 00 Durum Wheat flour to make the ideal Italian pasta dough

 

After the water is blended into the flour, we were shown how to begin the hand kneading on the wooden board

After the water is blended into the flour, we were shown how to begin the hand kneading on the wooden board

 

After the dough was the correct consistency and had a chance to “settle”, we used a rolling pin and then the pasta machine to make sheets of thins pasta that were then hand cut and hand rolled into hollow, twisted tubes

After the dough was the correct consistency and had a chance to “settle”, we used a rolling pin and then the pasta machine to make sheets of thins pasta that were then hand cut and hand rolled into hollow, twisted tubes

 

The zucchini (and their fried, cut flowers) were incorporated into the pasta sauce and the final dish (with some Parmesan cheese) was fantastic for lunch

The zucchini (and their fried, cut flowers) were incorporated into the pasta sauce and the final dish (with some Parmesan cheese) was fantastic for lunch

 

Our main course was baked, stuffed fresh eggplants with a filling of tomatoes, chopped eggplant, pecorino cheese with lots of olive oil and spices, particularly oregano

Our main course was baked, stuffed fresh eggplants with a filling of tomatoes, chopped eggplant, pecorino cheese with lots of olive oil and spices, particularly oregano

 

Dessert was a frozen “semifredo” of fresh Italian cantaloupe melon puree with separately whipped eggs and whipping cream with a fresh fruit syrup on top

Dessert was a frozen “semifredo” of fresh Italian cantaloupe melon puree with separately whipped eggs and whipping cream with a fresh fruit syrup on top

 

The exterior of the Ealaly, Roma, Italy

The exterior of the Ealaly complex, Roma, Italy

 

Eataly is now well known in New York City, NY, USA, as a shopping emporium and collection of restaurants with all things Italian; the original was in Italy and we visited the larger of the two complexes in Roma, Italy.  We did quite a bit of shopping – both fresh produce for upcoming meals and a lot of dried pasta, tomatoes, etc. for the pantry for cooking Italian meals as we circumnavigate the world, long after we depart from this year’s visit to Italy.

 

Fresh, local pomodori (tomatoes) in the green grocer section of Ealaly, Roma, Italy

Fresh, local pomodori (tomatoes) in the green grocer section of Ealaly, Roma, Italy

 

One of the many restuarants and “cafes” in Ealaly, Roma, Italy, featured fresh, hand-made flatbreads with very interesting toppings (e.g., zucchini and cheese with sun-dried tomatoes, on the left)

One of the many restuarants and “cafes” in Ealaly, Roma, Italy, featured fresh, hand-made flatbreads with very interesting toppings (e.g., zucchini and cheese with sun-dried tomatoes, on the left)

 

A display of regional Italian products, Ealaly, Roma, Italy

A display of regional Italian products, Ealaly, Roma, Italy

 

Roma (Rome), Italy

Our first view of Roma, Italy, from the west, driving into the city center with the “Wedding Cake” (Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II) in the center (with the chariot on top); note church domes dominate the skyline, taller than any buildings

Our first view of Roma, Italy, from the west, driving into the city center with the “Wedding Cake” (Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II) in the center (with the chariot on top); note church domes dominate the skyline, taller than any buildings

 

Roma (Rome), Italy’s capital, is a sprawling, cosmopolitan city with nearly 3,000 years of globally influential art, architecture and culture on display.  Ancient ruins such as the Forum and the Colosseum evoke the power of the former Roman Empire. Vatican City, headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church, has St. Peter’s Basilica and the Vatican Museums, which house masterpieces such as Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel frescoes.   We did an “overland” trip to Roma staying overnight in the city center for two nights, rather than making the long drive from the port of Civitavecchia round-trip daily.  Our focus on this trip was a cooking class with a local chef and enjoying our preparations as a late luncheon on his apartment’s rooftop terrace [see our next blog post] and a tour the next day of “underground Rome” [see an upcoming blog post].  Thus our photographs are not of the tourist highlights but rather vistas from our peregrinations around Roma.

 

An unusual view of the Spanish Steps at Piazza di Spagna – there are no people walking and sitting on the steps, due to closure of the area for extensive renovations, Roma, Italy

An unusual view of the Spanish Steps at Piazza di Spagna – there are no people walking and sitting on the steps, due to closure of the area for extensive renovations, Roma, Italy

 

The main statue in Piazza del Popolo at the end of the main shopping street, Via dei Corso (the “Corso”), Roma, Italy

The main statue in Piazza del Popolo at the end of the main shopping street, Via dei Corso (the “Corso”), Roma, Italy

 

We had a delicious dinner at a trattoria favored by locals, Pierliugi, dining outside on the street, serenaded by local musicians and enjoying the view of the local neighborhood, Roma, Italy

We had a delicious dinner at a trattoria favored by locals, Pierliugi, dining outside on the street, serenaded by local musicians and enjoying the view of the local neighborhood, Roma, Italy

 

Interior of the Pantheon, build at the height of the Roman Empire (with an opening at the top of the dome roof!) and later converted into a church, Roma, Italy

Interior of the Pantheon, build at the height of the Roman Empire (with an opening at the top of the dome roof!) and later converted into a church, Roma, Italy

 

Piazza Navona, one of the most famous and arguably most beautiful of Rome's many squares, viewed from the southern end with the Baroque church designed by Borromini on the left-center and two of Bernini’s fountains visible, Roma, Italy

Piazza Navona, one of the most famous and arguably most beautiful of Rome’s many squares, viewed from the southern end with the Baroque church designed by Borromini on the left-center and two of Bernini’s fountains visible, Roma, Italy

 

The central Bernini fountain at Piaza Navona, Roma, Italy

The central Bernini fountain at Piaza Navona, Roma, Italy

 

Largo di Torre Argentina hosts four Republican Roman temples and is where Emperor Julius Caesar was stabbed 23-times by his fellow senators on the Ides of March (15 March) behind the pine tree in the upper left, Roma, Italy

Largo di Torre Argentina hosts four Republican Roman temples and is where Emperor Julius Caesar was stabbed 23-times by his fellow senators on the Ides of March (15 March) behind the pine tree in the upper left, Roma, Italy

 

Sinagogia (Jewish Synagogue of Rome), on the bank of the Tiber, is the largest synagogue in Roma and was built in memory of the Ghetto created under orders of Paolo IV in 1555 where the city’s Jews were forced to live in squalid conditions until 1870

Sinagogia (Jewish Synagogue of Rome), on the bank of the Tiber, is the largest synagogue in Roma and was built in memory of the Ghetto created under orders of Paolo IV in 1555 where the city’s Jews were forced to live in squalid conditions until 1870

 

Cinque Terra (“Five Lands”), Italy

Manarola (left) and Riomaggiore (center right) seem to blend into the massive hillsides of the rock coast of Cinque Terra, Italy

Manarola (left) and Riomaggiore (center right) seem to blend into the massive hillsides of the rocky coast of Cinque Terra, Italy

 

Cinque Terre (“Five Lands” in English) is a string of centuries-old seaside villages on the rugged Italian Riviera coastline.  In each of the five towns, colorful houses and vineyards cling to steep terraces, harbors are filled with fishing boats and trattorias turn out seafood specialties along with the Liguria region’s famous sauce, pesto.  We took a private boat trip from our port in La Spezia around the southern end of Cinque Terra, home of Porto Venere.  Heading north, we passed Riomaggiore, Manorola, and Corniglia before stopping in Vernazza (with the region’s only protected harbor) and then Monterosso al Mare (the largest of the five villages) where we had the opportunity to hike uphill for some nice vistas and time to (window) shop and get refreshments.  The coastline, the five villages, and the surrounding hillsides are all part of the Cinque Terre National Park and the region is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

The stonework church on the point of Porto Venere looks like an extension of the land, hugging the far southern tip of the coastline of Cinque Terra, Italy

The stonework church on the point of Porto Venere looks like an extension of the land, hugging the far southern tip of the coastline of Cinque Terra, Italy

 

Manorola, Cinque Terra, Italy

Manorola, Cinque Terra, Italy

 

The beach behind the protected harbor of Vernazza, under the town’s church, Cinque Terra, Italy

The beach behind the protected harbor of Vernazza, under the town’s church, Cinque Terra, Italy

 

The other side of the beach behind the protected harbor of Vernazza, Cinque Terra, Italy

 

Interior of the church in Monterosso al Mare, Cinque Terra, Italy

Interior of the church in Monterosso al Mare, Cinque Terra, Italy

 

A ferry boat that goes up and down the coast of Cinque Terra, Italy, pulling into a natural rock “pier” where the passengers literally jump on and off the boat

A ferry boat that goes up and down the coast of Cinque Terra, Italy, pulling into a natural rock “pier” where the passengers literally jump on and off the boat

 

Corniglia, Cinque Terra, Italy

Corniglia, Cinque Terra, Italy

 

Riomaggiore, Cinque Terra, Italy

Riomaggiore, Cinque Terra, Italy

 

Eat local: Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, Côte d’Azur , France

Plage de Villefranche-sur-Mer (the beach of Villefranche-sur-Mer), Côte d’Azur, France

Plage de Villefranche-sur-Mer (the beach of Villefranche-sur-Mer), Côte d’Azur, France

 

From Nice we drove with some friends along the Côte d’Azur — known in English as the French Riviera, located on the Mediterranean coastline of the southeast corner of France — coast towards the east around the Cap de Nice and Parc du Mont Boron, past the town of Villefranche-sur-Mer and headed down the peninsula of Cap-Ferrat (past the town of Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat) to the tip of the peninsular to our first destination: the Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat (since our previous stay a number of years ago, it has become part of the Four Seasons hotel group).  We had the opportunity to talk a leisurely stroll around the extensive gardens and coastline before returning to the Veranda for a delicious and relaxing luncheon on the patio overlooking the gardens and coastline.  The kitchen is part of the hotel’s MICHELIN one-star restaurant, once again serving forth delectable fresh, local cuisine.  As a few friends have observed, one can get totally spoiled eating along the Côte d’Azur…

After lunch we then took the multi-kilometer walk – working off just a few of the calories from our repast — along the coastal path back up to the town of Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat which we explored on foot (with a lot of window shopping) before driving back to the ship in the port of Nice.  Note that had we driven just a few miles further east, we would have crossed the French border into Monte Carlo, Monaco.

 

The town of Villefranche-sur-Mer, Côte d’Azur, France

The town of Villefranche-sur-Mer, Côte d’Azur, France

 

Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat (a Four Seasons hotel), Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, France

Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat (a Four Seasons hotel), Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, France

 

An appetizer of fresh local burrata cheese and local tomatoes with a beautiful local rose wine at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

An appetizer of fresh local burrata cheese and local tomatoes with a beautiful local rose wine at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

 

Soup de Poisson with rouille, croutons and cheese at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

Soup de Poisson with rouille, croutons and cheese at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

 

Fresh shrimp with grilled local vegetables at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

Fresh shrimp with grilled local vegetables at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

 

Pan sautéed fresh local sea bass with vegetables and broth at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

Pan sautéed fresh local sea bass with vegetables and broth at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

 

Creamy lobster risotto with shaved Parmesan cheese at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

Creamy lobster risotto with shaved Parmesan cheese at the Veranda at Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, Cap-Ferrat, France

 

The harbor of Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, France, with the hills of the Côte d’Azur in the background

The harbor of Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat, France, with the hills of the Côte d’Azur in the background

 

Make local: Fragonard Parfumeur (perfume manufacturer), Grasse, France

Parfumerie Fragonard was opened in 1926 by Eugène Fuchs who chose to name it after the famous Grasse-born painter, Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732-1806), as a tribute to both the town of Grasse, France

Parfumerie Fragonard was opened in 1926 by Eugène Fuchs who chose to name it after the famous Grasse-born painter, Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732-1806), as a tribute to both the town of Grasse, France

 

Known as the perfume capital of the world, Grasse produces two-thirds of France’s natural aromas and is home to Perfumerie Fragonard, named after the famous Grasse-born painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard.  After our luncheon in Mougins [see our previous blog post], we visited the company’s historic buildings which include part of its present-day manufacturing facilities and a “laboratory” for guests to take a class in blending their own eau de cologne.

 

An historic steam distiller in the “museum” at Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

An historic steam distiller in the “museum” at Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

 

One of the eau de cologne bottling lines at Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

One of the eau de cologne bottling lines at Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

 

“In perfumery, the term Eau de Cologne designates a preparation whose perfume concentration content does not exceed 7%.  Most eau de colognes are made using citrus fruits.  During the first half of the 20th century, eaux de cologne were generally the only perfume that men wore.  Eau de Cologne began with an Italian called Giovanni Paolo Feminis, who set up a branch in Cologne where he sold an alcoholate with a fine reputation…  The perfume’s reputation spread throughout Europe, where it was given a simpler name, ‘Eau de Cologne’.” – source: Fragonard Parfumeur

 

While Grasse produces two-thirds of France’s natural aromas, the natural ingredients are source from around the world; Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

While Grasse produces two-thirds of France’s natural aromas, the natural ingredients are source from around the world; Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

 

The display outside our classroom “laboratory” showcased natural aroma sources from around the world, Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

The display outside our classroom “laboratory” showcased natural aroma sources from around the world, Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

 

Our classroom “laboratory” where we received instruction in how to blend our own unique Eau de Cologne which we bottled and took home, Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

Our classroom “laboratory” where we received instruction in how to blend our own unique Eau de Cologne which we bottled and took home, Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

 

In our “laboratory” class we learned about the ingredients of Eau de Cologne.  The essential oils of lavender, rosemary, neroli, petit grain, and lemon verbena are extracted using steam distillation.  The essential oils of all citrus fruits are extracted using the cold extraction process.  Your blogger’s formula for his personal (take home) Eau de Cologne was 20% Brazilian Orange, 30% Italian Lemon, 35% Italian Bergamot, 7% Verbena and 1% Rosemary.  Unfortunately, it is not yet available in Fragonard’s Grasse, Paris and New York stores…

 

The “laboratory’s” display of a selection of the natural aromas available to the professional staff at Fragonard Parfumeur for blending Perfumes and Eaux de Colognes, Grasse, France

The “laboratory’s” display of a selection of the natural aromas available to the professional staff at Fragonard Parfumeur for blending Perfumes and Eaux de Colognes, Grasse, France

 

An individual “laboratory” work station where we individually hand crafted our unique Eau de Cologne and then bottled it to take home, Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

An individual “laboratory” work station where we individually hand crafted our unique Eau de Cologne and then bottled it to take home, Fragonard Parfumeur, Grasse, France

 

 

Eat Local: Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

A view of the hillside around the town of Mougins, France

A view of the hillside around the town of Mougins, France

 

From Nice we drove west along the coast to Cannes and headed north to spend the morning exploring Mougins, known for its gastronomy, legendary landscape and art de vivre (the art of living) followed by an al fresco luncheon at a MICHELIN One-star restaurant and then on to Grasse which is known as the perfume capital of the world [see our next post].

 

In the center of town we came across a store with authorized reproductions of works in various media by Pablo Picasso who had lived and worked in Mougins, France

In the center of town we came across a store with authorized reproductions of works in various media by Pablo Picasso who had lived and worked in Mougins, France

 

An unusual decoration on the side of a church – the French tricolor, Mougins, France

An unusual decoration on the side of a church – the French tricolor, Mougins, France

 

The patio of MICHELIN One-star restaurant Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France, where we enjoyed a delicious group luncheon after touring the town of Mougins

The patio of MICHELIN One-star restaurant Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France, where we enjoyed a delicious group luncheon after touring the town of Mougins

 

A selection of seasonally fresh amuse bouches (single, bite-sized hors d’œuvres) to begin our luncheon at Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

A selection of seasonally fresh amuse bouches (single, bite-sized hors d’œuvres) to begin our luncheon at Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

 

Our luncheon was at the beautiful La Mas Candille, a Relais & Chateaux hotel whose restaurant has been awarded One-star by MICHELIN.  Chef David Chauvac prepares dishes using fresh, local, seasonal ingredients

 

A delightful appetizer of cold corn soup with beet root and radish garnishes, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

A delightful appetizer of cold corn soup with beet root and radish garnishes, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

 

Summer vegetable Bayaldi, poached egg scented with basil oil, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

Summer vegetable Bayaldi, poached egg scented with basil oil, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

 

Rockfish fillet, steamed sand-grown carrots, verbena and wild fennel sauce, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

Rockfish fillet, steamed sand-grown carrots, verbena and wild fennel sauce, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

 

Crispy molten chocolate, creamy roast peanut sauce, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

Crispy molten chocolate, creamy roast peanut sauce, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

 

Cappuccino and mignardises, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

Cappuccino and mignardises, Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

 

Mignardises (bite-sized desserts) – macaroons and pavé (candied jelly), Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

Mignardises (bite-sized desserts) – macaroons and pavé (candied jelly), Le Mas Candille, Mougins, France

 

Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

A small section of the museum building and the gardens, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

A small section of the museum building and the gardens, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

 

“Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum) was inaugurated on 7 July 1973 in the presence of artist Marc Chagall (1887-1985) who celebrated his 86th birthday on the same day. It was the first time a national museum had been devoted to an artist in his lifetime. The building was designed in consultation with the architect Andre Hermant (1908-1978) to house an outstanding collection of works donated to the French State by Marc Chagall and his wife Valentina in 1996 and 1972. Inspired by the Bible, “the greatest source of poetry of all time” according to the artist, the donated works guided the building’s architectural design. Since the museum opened, the seventeen Biblical Message paintings have been displayed in the rooms according to the artist’s original installation plan. The works therefore interact closely with the elements in the surrounding space, such as the stained glass windows created especially for the auditorium, or the mosaic reflected in the pond.

“Chagall wanted it to be a house, rather than a museum. He remained faithful to the museum until his death in 1985. The pure, sleek lines of the building are surrounded by a garden of Mediterranean plants and trees.” — Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall

 

The Creation of Man, Marc Chagall 1956-1958, oil on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

The Creation of Man, Marc Chagall 1956-1958, oil on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

 

“The Creation of Man, Marc Chagall 1956-1958, oil on canvas. The bottom section of this painting depicts a scene from the Book of Genesis, while the top section features several different biblical episodes. The lower section is painted in a vibrant blue embellished with depictions of vegetation and animals. A winged creature moves to the fore, holding Adam’s body and Eve holding an apple in the loser right-hand section are references to the original sin. In the upper section, Chagall has painted a turning sun. Its colorful rays house a crowd of different characters: biblical protagonists, the Jewish people, hybrid creatures, and more. Christ on the cross is also shown here. His hips are encircled by the prayer shawl that Jewish men wear in the synagogue. Chagall meant this figure to represent the martyrdom of the Jewish people in World War II. Above and beyond the creation of Man, Chagall infuses this painting with a broader vision of the history of humanity.” — Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall

 

Paradise, Marc Chagall 1961, oil on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

Paradise, Marc Chagall 1961, oil on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

 

“Paradise, Marc Chagall 1961, oil on canvas. The painting represents two scenes, one set in Paradise and one on Earth. To the left, the creation of Eve, and to the right, the Temptation. These two scenes take place in a garden bathed in blue and green light, animated by warm, vibrant flecks of color. Animals, winged beings and hybrid creatures fly around Adam and Eve in a harmonious communion. To the left, Eve emerges from a cloud. The first woman was fashioned from the rib of the first man, as symbolized by Adam’s raised arm. To the right, Adam and Eve are intertwined, forming a single being with just two arms and three legs. They are on the brink of sharing the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge, which they believed would make them God’s equals.” — Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall

 

Le Cantique de Cantiques, Marc Chagall 1960, oil on red paper on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

Le Cantique de Cantiques, Marc Chagall 1960, oil on red paper on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

 

Elijah on a chariot, Marc Chagall 1961, mosaic installed on a wall outside the installation of the Biblical Message paintings, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

Elijah on a chariot, Marc Chagall 1961, mosaic installed on a wall outside the installation of the Biblical Message paintings, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

 

L’Atelier, Marc Chagall 1910, oil on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France

L’Atelier, Marc Chagall 1910, oil on canvas, Museo Nazionale Marc Chagall (Marc Chagall National Museum), Nice, France