Busan, South Korea

This photograph of Busan_s Yeongdo-Gu Island was taken during lunch from a Korean restaurant on the 6th floor of the Lotte Department store in the Busan Central District

This photograph of Busan’s Yeongdo-Gu Island was taken during lunch from a Korean restaurant on the 6th floor of the Lotte Department store in the Busan Central District, about 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) from the Busan International Passenger Terminal where our ship was docked, Busan, South Korea

 

As the second largest city in South Korea with a population of 3.6 million, Busan is the largest coastal city in the country.  Busan attained its geographical and social importance in Korea during the Korean War (1950-1953) as the city that received large influxes of refugees and war supplies, as it is located on the country’s southeast coast, far from the DMZ (demilitarized zone).  South Korea’s and one of the world’s largest ports is also a popular summer retreat offering broad sandy beaches and hot-spring resorts.  The city climbs the surrounding hillsides and stretches along the coast well past the busy harbor, offering a range of attractions beyond the beaches. Buddhist temples and hillside parks, lively Jagalchi Fish Market and the United Nations Memorial Cemetery, along with restaurants serving excellent seafood and grilled meats, are all part of the appeal in this dynamic seaside metropolis.

 

The Busanghangdaegyo Bridge opened in 2014 and made it possible to drive from central Busan to Yeongdo Island in only 15 minutes, greatly reducing the travel time, Busan, South Korea

The Busanghangdaegyo Bridge opened in 2014 and made it possible to drive from central Busan to Yeongdo Island in only 15 minutes, greatly reducing the travel time, Busan, South Korea; the city notes that the bridge was “designed like a horse running at full speed” and it “suits the vibrant energy of the Busanghang Port”

 

Busanghang Port and the new Busanghangdaegyo Bridge, Busan, South Korea

Busanghang Port and the new Busanghangdaegyo Bridge, Busan, South Korea

 

Buildings near Busan Bay in Central Busan, South Korea

Buildings near Busan Bay in Central Busan, South Korea

 

This building_s exterior serves as a neon billboard, Busan, South Korea

 

A memorial to members of the United Nations peace keeping force who died in the Korean War, Busan, South Korea

A memorial to members of the United Nations peace keeping force who died in the Korean War, Busan, South Korea

 

“The Korean War began when North Korea invaded South Korea.  The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea.  China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union gave some assistance…  After… reversals of fortune, which saw Seoul change hands four times, the last two years of fighting became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel.  The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate.  North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign.  Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies.  The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed.  The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners.  However, no peace treaty has been signed, and the two Koreas are technically still at war.  Periodic clashes, many of which are deadly, continue to the present.” — Wikipedia

 

Statues and pagodas in the gardens outside the Busan Museum, Busan, South Korea

Statues and pagodas in the gardens outside the Busan Museum, Busan, South Korea

 

First opened in 1978 and expanded in 2002, the Busan Museum plays a major role in preserving traditional Korean culture with its extensive collection of relics from the prehistoric era to more recent times.  Buddhist statues, pagodas, and stone monuments are displayed in the Outdoor Exhibition Hall.  We visited the Dongnae Hall that introduces the history and culture of Busan based on relics discovered in the areas of Busan from the Paleolithic Age to the Goryeo Dynasty (including a large number of celadons).

 

Two of five panels of a very famous Korean panel painting at the Busan Museum, Busan, South Korea; the style was influenced by Chinese paintings

Two of five panels of a very famous Korean panel painting at the Busan Museum, Busan, South Korea; the style was influenced by Chinese paintings

 

Celadon figures created during the Goryeo Dynasty, Busan Museum, Busan, South Korea

Celadon figures created during the Goryeo Dynasty, Busan Museum, Busan, South Korea

 

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