Nagasaki and Arita, Kyushu, Japan

The central business district of Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan, is located behind and uphill of this small harbor -- our dock was adjacent to this area and quite handy to walk into town; note

The central business district of Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan, is located behind and uphill of this small harbor — our dock was adjacent to this area and quite handy to walk into town; note that the 1945 atomic bomb exploded to the west of this area (not visible on the left side of this photograph) where there is now a memorial in Peace Park and the Atomic Bomb Museum

 

“Nagasaki (長崎) is an attractively situated port city on the island of Kyushu and the capital of Nagasaki Prefecture.  As one of Japan’s closest port cities to the Asian mainland, Nagasaki has played a prominent role in foreign trade relations for many centuries and was the most important of only a very few ports open to restricted numbers of foreign traders during Japan’s period of isolation.  In more recent history, Nagasaki became the second city after Hiroshima to be destroyed by an atomic bomb towards the end of World War II.” – www.japan-guide.com

 

The Nagasaki Seaside Park is adjacent to the pier where we docked, with the city spread out beyond it as well as to the west (the left side of the photograph) and the east, Nagasaki, Kyu

The Nagasaki Seaside Park is adjacent to the pier where we docked, with the city spread out beyond it as well as to the west (the left side of the photograph) and the east, Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan; the city’s population now is around 450,000

 

The shopping mall in the central business district includes the Hamaya Department Store, a leading retailer in Japan, Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan; the mall is interesting architecturally in

The shopping mall in the central business district includes the Hamaya Department Store, a leading retailer in Japan, Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan; the mall is interesting architecturally in that it was not designed and built as a shopping mall, rather all of the buildings along a number of streets have had the streets roofed and lighted to create a rainproof enclosure for pedestrians to stroll and shop

 

A traditional older home in Arita, Kyushu, Japan, built of wood, rather than stone, for better survival in an earthquake; the symbol represents Mt. Fuji and rivers

A traditional older home in Arita, Kyushu, Japan, built of wood, rather than stone, for better survival in an earthquake; the symbol represents Mt. Fuji and rivers

 

As noted in our previous blog, “Arita (the cradle of the Japanese porcelain industry), Kyushu Japan”, visitors come to Arita to learn about the city’s history and current ongoing role as a leader in Japanese porcelain production. One of the larger stores/galleries in Arita that we visited belongs to Fukagawa-Seiji Japan, Purveyor To The Imperial Household Agency. The company notes, “The Fukagawa Family, which lit its first ceramic kiln in 1650, founded its own crafts company, Fukagawa-Seiji, in 1894. The company was awarded the Grand Prize at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, and in 1910 Fukagawa-Seiji was appointed official purveyor to the Japanese Imperial Household. Making all materials, glazes and paints internally from their initial composition down to their finishing touches, this unique company has the largest expert workforce in all of Arita, with seven of the nation’s most qualified traditional technical artists producing the world’s greatest quality porcelain.”  Their web site is www.fukagawa-seiji.co.jp

 

These contemporary covered cups and platter draw on older Fukagawa designs, Fukagawa-Seiji store, Arita, Kyushu, Japan

These contemporary covered cups and platter draw on older Fukagawa designs, Fukagawa-Seiji store, Arita, Kyushu, Japan

 

The porcelain color of Lapis Lazuli here is referred to as “Clearly Lapis Lazuli” and is acclaimed as “Fukagawa Blue”, Fukagawa-Seiji store, Arita, Kyushu, Japan

The porcelain color of Lapis Lazuli here is referred to as “Clearly Lapis Lazuli” and is acclaimed as “Fukagawa Blue”, Fukagawa-Seiji store, Arita, Kyushu, Japan

 

These covered bowls showcase the white purity of Fukagawa-Seiji “almost transparent white porcelains” with designs using the “Fukagawa Blue” pigments, Fukagawa-Seiji store, Arita

These covered bowls showcase the white purity of Fukagawa-Seiji “almost transparent white porcelains” with designs using the “Fukagawa Blue” pigments, Fukagawa-Seiji store, Arita, Kyushu, Japan

 

This 19th century home was built in the style of the Portuguese settlers in Nagasaki (who had a concession as the only European traders allowed to live in Japan – and only on an island

This 19th century home was built in the style of the Portuguese settlers in Nagasaki (who had a concession as the only European traders allowed to live in Japan – and only on an island off of Nagasaki — for about two centuries until 1853), some of whom migrated to Arita, Kyushu, Japan, after Japan opened to the west following American Commodore Perry’s visit and mandate

 

 

One thought on “Nagasaki and Arita, Kyushu, Japan

  1. So, in the 19th century, it was the Portuguese who were responsible for bringing Japanese goods to Europe?
    This is certainly a city with a lot of history and some of it, quite sad.

    Like

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