Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Lake Crescent in the Olympic National Park, Washington, USA, is a very popular recreation spot with a lodge on the southern shore where we had an outstanding catered picnic lunch before

Lake Crescent in the Olympic National Park, Washington, USA, is a very popular recreation spot with a lodge on the southern shore where we had an outstanding catered picnic lunch before setting off to hike the Barnes Trail to Marymere Falls

 

After hiking on Hurricane Ridge at the Olympic National Park, Washington, we drove to Lake Crescent on the northeast border of the park (the lake is approximately 17 miles (27 kilometers) from Port Angeles, Washington.  It is the second deepest lake in Washington, at an official depth of 624 feet (190 meters) — informal soundings have been recorded at more than 1,00 feet (300 meters).  We had an outstanding catered picnic lunch at lakeside before setting off to hike the Barnes Trail to Marymere Falls (1.8 miles / 2.9 kilometers one-way) through an old-growth lowland forest consisting of fir, cedar, hemlock, and alder trees.  Marymere Falls is 90 feet (27 meters) tall and flows into Barnes Creek.

 

Kayaking, canoeing and swimming are very popular at Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Kayaking, canoeing and swimming are very popular at Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

 

Hiking from the southern shore of Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA, we came to the old-growth lowland forest entrance to the Barnes trail which took us to Marymere F

Hiking from the southern shore of Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA, we came to the old-growth lowland forest entrance to the Barnes trail which took us to Marymere Falls

 

The Olympic Peninsula contains coast, forest and mountain ecosystems that combine to create a spectacular wilderness area.  The Olympic Peninsula is home to eight Native American tribes that developed complex hunter-gatherer societies and continue to keep their traditions alive.  European explorers who ventured here in the late 1700s heralded the way for homesteaders.  The Olympics were set aside as a national monument in 1909 and further protected as Olympic National Park in 1938.  Today the park is internationally recognized as a Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site, testimony to the rich resources of the region.

 

At various points on the trail the fir, cedar, hemlock, and alder trees were covered with moss and lichen due to the high average moisture in the forest; Lake Crescent, Olympic National

At various points on the trail the fir, cedar, hemlock, and alder trees were covered with moss and lichen due to the high average moisture in the forest; Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

 

If these were oak trees covered with moss, then we could be in the southeastern section of the U.S., such as Florida, Georgia and Louisiana; Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washing

If these were oak trees covered with moss, then we could be in the southeastern section of the U.S., such as Florida, Georgia and Louisiana; Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

 

Marymere Fall, 90 feet (27 meters) tall, flows into Barnes Creek near Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

Marymere Fall, 90 feet (27 meters) tall, flows into Barnes Creek near Lake Crescent, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

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