Skagway, Alaska, USA

At 6.45 a.m. we took the Haines-Skagway Fast Ferry from Haines up the Lynn Canal (pictured) to Skagway, Alaska, USA, which is on the right after the last channel on the right side of the

At 6:45 a.m. we took the Haines-Skagway Fast Ferry from Haines up the Lynn Canal (pictured) to Skagway, Alaska, USA, which is on the right after the last channel on the right side of the photograph

 

Skagway is a compact city (with a population of around 1,000) in southeast Alaska, at the head of the Taiya Inlet, on the north end of the Lynn Canal on the most northern fjord of the Alaska panhandle on the Inside Passage.  Skagway’s historical district features about 100 buildings from the gold rush era, now preserved as part of the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park.  The city hosts about a million tourists annually, mostly arriving on cruise ships with up to 2,500 passengers each (a maximum of 4 cruise ships can dock simultaneously with another one or two at anchor, reaching the town by tender boats).  The White Pass & Yukon Route (WP & YR) Railroad runs vintage locomotives past the famously steep Chilkoot trail that was climbed by thousands of prospectors in 1898 and 1899 on their way to White Pass, British Columbia, Canada and on for another nearly 600 miles to Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada to the gold fields.  The WP & YR Railroad offers sweeping mountain views during its climb toward White Pass and the cities, beyond.

 

The historic district of Skagway, Alaska, is about a 10-minute walk from the waterfront, behind the red crane in the photograph

The historic district of Skagway, Alaska, is about a 10-minute walk from the waterfront, behind the red crane in the photograph

 

The marina next to the cruise piers in the harbor of Skagway, Alaska

The marina next to the cruise piers in the harbor of Skagway, Alaska

 

ASAAYIX KUDZITEEY HAA LEELK’U HAS AANI

(This Land of Our Grandparents has Tlingit Names)

From a sidewalk signboard with a local Skagway map showing the traditional place names of the Skagway Area: “We are from Skagway.  Our grandfathers and grandmothers are our Ancestors who have gone on and we call them Haa Shagóon.  It is from ages past that they have called this land Lkóot Aani (Chilkoot).  That is how we know it today.  The names of our land are Shgagwéi (Skagway), Náxk’w (Naakhu Bay), and Deiyáa (Dyea).  We who now walk this land seek to learn the ways of our ancestors, to live in harmony and balance on this land.  We have always had respect for each other through our culture.  Watch carefully over the land of our grandparents.  Thank you so much, our friends and relatives.”

 

The old historic buildings are self labeled – here, the 1900 “Railroad Building”, Skagway, Alaska, USA

Many of the old historic buildings are self labeled – here, the 1900 “Railroad Building”, Skagway, Alaska, USA

 

This newer building (in the 1898 style) looks like it could have been the ticket office during the Yukon Gold Rush for the WP & YR (White Pass, British Columbia, Canada and Yukon Route)

This newer building (in the 1898 style) looks like it could have been the ticket office during the Yukon Gold Rush for the WP & YR (White Pass, British Columbia, Canada and Yukon Route) Railroad, Skagway, Alaska, USA

 

The pink building on the left, built in 1897, is one of the older extant buildings in the historic district of Skagway, Alaska

The pink building on the left, built in 1897, is one of the older extant buildings in the historic district of Skagway, Alaska

 

A U.S. NPS (National Park Service) recreation of “The Mascot Saloon” – the original “Mascotte”, built early in the boom year of 1898, was one of EIGHTY saloons in town, and was

A U.S. NPS (National Park Service) recreation of “The Mascot Saloon” – the original “Mascotte”, built early in the boom year of 1898, was one of EIGHTY saloons in town, and was expanded in 1899 after paying the $1,500 license fee newly imposed by the city of Skagway, Alaska, USA; it survived until a local alcohol prohibition led to its closure permanently in 1916

 

An historic photograph of Skagway, Alaska, USA; during the peak of the Yukon Gold Rush from the fall of 1897 to the spring of 1899, entrepreneurs built quickly and cheaply to make a fas

An historic photograph of Skagway, Alaska, USA; during the peak of the Yukon Gold Rush from the fall of 1897 to the spring of 1899, entrepreneurs built quickly and cheaply to make a fast profit – few of the rough and ready boomtown buildings exist today, and many of the remaining structures have been altered; source: U. S. National Park Service

 

The historic1888 “Moore home” in the latest of several locations in Skagway, Alaska; it was built by the visionary of a railway over White Pass (the route to Dawson City for the Yuko

The historic 1888 “Moore home” in the latest of several locations in Skagway, Alaska; it was built by the visionary of a railway over White Pass (the route to Dawson City for the Yukon Gold Rush prosepctors) and first located in “Mooresville”, a small company town centered on what would emerge as Fifth Ave. in downtown Skagway – note that the eventual railway was built by a team that did not include Moore (construction of the WP&YR Railway began on 28 May 1898)

 

The U.S. NPS (National Park Service) has moved and preserved a number of old historic buildings in Skagway, Alaska; the sign on “The Brass Pic” is self evident as to its former busin

The U.S. NPS (National Park Service) has moved and preserved a number of old historic buildings in Skagway, Alaska; the sign on “The Brass Pic” is self evident as to its former business: “House of Negotiable Affection”

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

2 thoughts on “Skagway, Alaska, USA

  1. Riccardo,My father spent much of WW II posted in Skagway. Any sign of where they actually were?

    Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

    Like

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