Frazer Lake Salmon and Bears, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

The floatplane base in Kodiak, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA, where we charted a plane to head to Frazer Lake

The float plane base in Kodiak, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA, where we chartered a plane to head to Frazer Lake

 

Several of us chartered a float plane in Kodiak, the main city on Kodiak Island, Alaska – to the southwest of Anchorage – to fly us to Frazer Lake where the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) a number of years ago built a fish ladder after stocking the barren lake with salmon eggs and fry.  The annual salmon run has attracted a large number of Kodiak brown bears who come to the weir and feast on salmon.  This was an excellent photography trip and an educational experience as we learned about the ADF&G efforts to constructively manage the local ecosystem.

 

Our first sight of Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

Our first sight of Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

Our floatplane tied up for the day at Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA; from here we hiked a little over one mile (1.6 km) to Frazer Falls

Our float plane tied up for the day at Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA; from here we hiked about one mile (1.6 km) to Frazer Falls

 

At 30 feet high, Frazer Falls is impassable for sockeye salmon searching for a nice spot upstream to spawn, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

At 30 feet high, Frazer Falls is impassable for sockeye salmon searching for a nice spot upstream to spawn, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

From the ADF&G signpost: “The 30-foot Frazer Falls once prevented sockeye salmon from reaching Frazer Lake, but a vision and hard work created a dynamic fishery.  Frazer Lake was barren of sockeye salmon until 1951, when biologists stocked the lake with eggs and fry.  Mature salmon returned to spawn in 1956, but could not complete their journey, so scientists backpacked them around the falls.  To enable returning salmon to reach Frazer Lake on their own, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game designed a fish pass in the early 1960s.  In 1964, returning adult salmon ascended the new fish pass without assistance to spawn.  ADF&G made numerous improvements over the years to ease passage around the falls and strengthen the salmon run.  Today, the immense Frazer fish pass increases spawning and rearing habitat for this population of sockeye salmon.  It provides additional fish for harvest each year and supports the fourth largest sockeye run on Kodiak, substantially benefitting the local economy.”

 

The fish pass up Frazer Falls was constructed in the early 1960s by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA; the Frazer Lake sockeye population has

The fish pass up Frazer Falls was constructed in the early 1960s by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA; the Frazer Lake sockeye population has increased from six in 1956 to well over a million

 

Through their life cycle, salmon help sustain the Kodiak community.  Every summer adult salmon return to Frazer Falls from the Pacific Ocean to lay and fertilize their eggs.  The spawning salmon die, leaving their carcasses.  Bears, foxes, ravens, eagles, and insects thrive off of the energy-rich remains of spawned-out salmon.  Animals leave scat and their own bodies that decay and provide energy for plants.  Alevins (a young fish; especially, a newly hatched salmon when still attached to the yolk sac) hatch in the spring.  Salmon fry eat insects and grow in the shade of plants that received energy from decaying salmon.  Within about two years fry mature into smolt and leave for the sea.  Sockeye salmon spend one to four years growing strong at sea before returning to the rivers where they were hatched.

 

A mother brown bear who spent the morning “fishing” (with her paws and mouth) for sockeye salmon for herself and her three cubs, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

A mother brown bear who spent the morning “fishing” (with her paws and mouth) for sockeye salmon for herself and her three cubs, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

Feasting on a sockeye salmon, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

Feasting on a sockeye salmon, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

Mom is joined by the first of three cubs who would like her to share her “catch”, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

Mom is joined by the first of three cubs who would like her to share her “catch”, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

A second cub joins mom and the first cub, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

A second cub joins mom and the first cub, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

Later, one of the cubs spotted a sockeye salmon and heads across the river to try and catch it, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

Later, one of the cubs spotted a sockeye salmon and heads across the river to try and catch it, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

The family taking a break from fishing and dining, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

The family taking a break from fishing and dining, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

Back on the “hunt” at the end of the fish weir, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

Back on the “hunt” at the end of the fish weir, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

As we left, the family continued their fishing and eating, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

As we left, the family continued their fishing and eating, Frazer Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

2 thoughts on “Frazer Lake Salmon and Bears, Kodiak Island, Alaska USA

  1. These are amazing!!! And so much better than the photos we got while there in 2012. Fun to relive that memory of wildlife at its best – in an even more amazing way. Warm regards, Cynthia

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