Kyoto Highlights (Part I), Honshu Island, Japan (2019)

Kinkaku (The Golden Pavillion) is a shariden, a Buddhist hall containing relics of Buddha; it is part of Rokuon-ji Temple, a Zen Buddhist temple, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan – viewed here from the forested hill leading to the Sekka-tei Teahouse

Kinkaku (The Golden Pavillion) is a shariden, a Buddhist hall containing relics of Buddha; it is part of Rokuon-ji Temple, a Zen Buddhist temple, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan – viewed here from the forested hill leading to the Sekka-tei Teahouse

 

From Kobe, where our ship docked, we joined a small group of friends for a three-day trip to Kyoto, Japan’s former imperial capital, for our third visit.  We had the opportunity to revisit some of Kyoto’s 17 World Heritage Sites and had some great new experiences, meeting some leading artisans and getting a blessing at a Buddhist temple where Apple CEO Steve Jobs had spent some time getting an introduction to Zen Buddhism.  Our blog posts on Kyoto are abbreviated and include some highlights from our explorations.

 

The garden and buildings, centered on the Kinkaku (The Golden Pavillion) were said to represent the Pure Land of Buddha in this world; the villa also functioned as an official guesthouse, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan

The garden and buildings, centered on the Kinkaku (The Golden Pavillion) were said to represent the Pure Land of Buddha in this world; the villa also functioned as an official guesthouse, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan

 

In 1994, Kinkaku (The Golden Pavillion) and Rokuon-ji Temple were registered as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan

In 1994, Kinkaku (The Golden Pavillion) and Rokuon-ji Temple were registered as a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan

 

The outer gate of Nijo-jo Castle, a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site, leading to rooms that witnessed some of the most important events in Japanese history in the 400 years since it was built (no photographs were allowed inside)

The outer gate of Nijo-jo Castle, a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site, leading to rooms that witnessed some of the most important events in Japanese history in the 400 years since it was built (no photographs were allowed inside), Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan; the castle was completed in 1603 and built for the first Shogun of the Tokugawa Shogunate (1603-1867), a period of peace and prosperity that ended when Shogun Tokugawa Yoshinobu announced in the castle his intention to restore imperial rule (1868 was the beginning of the Meiji Restoration)

 

Our first night’s dinner was in the Geisha district, Gion, where a young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan

Our first night’s dinner was in the Geisha district, Gion, where a young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan

 

A young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan -- #2

A young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan — #2

 

A young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan -- #3

A young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan — #3

 

A young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan -- #4

A young Geisha performed several traditional dances for us, Kyoto, Honshu Island, Japan — #4

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

1 thought on “Kyoto Highlights (Part I), Honshu Island, Japan (2019)

  1. Your third visit? Must have felt like “old home week” in the beautiful setting. Certainly an enjoyable and memorable evening.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s