Eat local: Gourmet Delights in Tasmania, Australia (2020)

We spent a very enjoyable day touring Tasmania’s “Cradle to Coast Tasting Trail” with a guide, starting along the coast (we were docked at Burnie) and then exploring inland in the rolling hills farm terrain

We spent a very enjoyable day touring Tasmania’s “Cradle to Coast Tasting Trail” with a guide, starting along the coast (we were docked at Burnie) and then exploring inland in the rolling hills farm terrain

 

A small group of us toured northern Tasmania, Australia, with a hired guide (and large van), to explore some of the local gourmet delights.  But first, we checked out the local fauna.  We began with a drive east alomg the coast from Burnie to Turners Beach, pausing at Penguin to spot several of the famously elusive native platypus (no photographs, as they were mostly underwater).  Our first gourmet delights stop was to enjoy, with some of the locals, morning tea/coffee and delicious fruit-based pastries at The Berry Patch, a popular café and berry farm.  We next drove south from the coast and headed into farm country.  The Bennet family has been raising sheep and dairy cows around Elizabeth Town since the late 1880s. We had a tour of their cheese factory at Ashgrove Tasmanian Farm and sampled some of the hand-crafted cheese.   Our next stop was to enjoy a sampling of the fragrant infused oils and olives at Wattle Hill Olives. Tasmanian enology entered the picture at Ghost Rock Wines.  Following a tasting of their wines, we enjoyed a rustic family-style lunch that featured locally sourced produce, seafood, meats, cheese, pâté, grilled and pickled veggies, and toasted bread from Pigeon Whole Bakers, accompanied by both red and white Ghost Rock wines.

After lunch, we continued our drive and were welcomed by Belgian-born chocolatier Igor Van Gerwen to House of Anvers, the confectionery company he founded in 1989.   We had an extensive tour of the factory and learned about the chocolate making process.  With a cup of coffee or tea, we had the opportunity to enjoy their decadent, chocolatey treats made with the finest cacao and rich Tasmanian butter and cream.  We ended the day with a tasting of bottle-fermented alcoholic beverages at Spreyton Cider Co.  Drawing on their years of experience producing fresh apple juice, Spreyton began brewing hard cider (7.5 – 8% ABV – alcohol by volume) in 2012.

 

We didn’t have time on our tour to do hand berry picking in the berry fields at The Berry Patch, but did enjoy some great pastries (see following photographs) and delicious coffees and teas; Tasmania, Australia

We didn’t have time on our tour to do hand berry picking in the berry fields at The Berry Patch, but did enjoy some great pastries (see following photographs) and delicious coffees and teas; Tasmania, Australia

 

The Berry Patch’s website description: “Just 10 minutes from Devonport in Tasmania’s North West, you can experience both culinary perfection from our cafe menu, and an authentic farm experience.  Dine at our restaurant and then hand-pick your own sweet and delicious berries in our ‘Pick Your Own’ fields. We also have a farm shop where you can purchase pre-picked fruit, and other house made and locally sourced goodies.  Enjoy gourmet pizzas from our authentic wood-fired oven, sit under our covered deck while the kids play on the hay bails, in the sandbox and at the ping pong tables, or enjoy time in the yurt listening to live music during a summer event.” – www.theberrypatch.com.au

 

A pastry from The Berry Patch made with chocolate cake rounds filled with fresh, local whipped cream and berries from the premises; Tasmania, Australia

A pastry from The Berry Patch made with chocolate cake rounds filled with fresh, local whipped cream and berries from the premises; Tasmania, Australia

 

A delicious blueberry muffin made with local ingredients at The Berry Patch, Tasmania, Australia

A delicious blueberry muffin made with local ingredients at The Berry Patch, Tasmania, Australia

 

Pavlova is an Australian creation – meringue topped with fresh fruit (a favorite at end of the year holidays celebrations); Tasmania, Australia

Pavlova is an Australian creation – meringue topped with fresh fruit (a favorite at end of the year holidays celebrations), enjoyed at The Berry Patch; Tasmania, Australia

 

Our intrepid traveler paused beside an Ashgrove Farms Cheese cow before entering the factory for a tour, including an explanation of the cheese-making process and then a tasting of the wide variety of award-winning cheeses; Tasmania, Australia

Our intrepid traveler paused beside an Ashgrove Farms Cheese cow before entering the factory for a tour, including an explanation of the cheese-making process and then a tasting of the wide variety of award-winning cheeses; Tasmania, Australia

 

“The Ashgrove milk and cheese factory is located at Elizabeth Town, in the heart of the dairying and cropping region in Northern Tasmania.  Several generations of Bennett families have been farming the land surrounding the milk and cheese factory since the 1880’s.  In the late 1980s a decision was made to further develop the dairy operations with the decline in wool prices and the stagnation of the vegetable industry.  John and Michael Bennett’s goal in establishing the cheese factory was to gain independence from the low commodity prices that dominated Tasmanian milk supply and to produce premium quality cheese by on-farm value adding using farm milk.  In preparation a significant investment was made in building a new 50-unit rotary dairy in 1990.  From an initial small factory built in 1993, the factory has grown in size over the years.  The factory store which opened in April 1994 has enabled our valued customers and tourists to learn how our cheese is made.

“By 2001, the cheese operation had grown sufficiently to enable the business to be separated from the Ashgrove Farms farming operation.  The Ashgrove Cheese company was established in 2001 by Michael and John Bennett and their respective wives Maureen and Connie.  Ashgrove Farms continues to be the main supplier of milk to the Ashgrove Cheese factory.  In 2012 Ashgrove Farm Milk won a number of awards including best Farm Light Milk at the Dairy Industry Association of Australia awards.” — www.ashgrovecheese.com.au/

 

The cheese aging room at the Ashgrove Farms Cheese factory in Elizabeth Town, in the heart of the dairying and cropping region in Northern Tasmania, Australia

The cheese aging room at the Ashgrove Farms Cheese factory in Elizabeth Town, in the heart of the dairying and cropping region in Northern Tasmania, Australia

 

Olive trees at Wattle Hill Olives, an award-winning producer of extra virgin olive oil in Tasmania, Australia

Olive trees at Wattle Hill Olives, an award-winning producer of extra virgin olive oil in Tasmania, Australia

 

“Wattle Hill Olives produces award winning Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Wattle Hill has 2,000 trees with Spanish and French varieties.  The Tables Olives are nearing maturity and will be available in the next few years.  Wattle Hill also produces balsamic olive oil salad dressing/dipping sauces which are irresistible.  George and Veronica enjoy going to the markets and meeting people and giving them a taste of their oil.  The Oil can also be purchased at most Tasmanian IGA Stores, some restaurants and fruit markets.” — www.foodandbeveragetasmania.com/

 

In addition to plain extra virgin olive oil, Wattle Hill Olives produces a number of flavored oils, most of which we had a chance to sample and enjoy at their facility; Tasmania, Australia

In addition to plain extra virgin olive oil, Wattle Hill Olives produces a number of flavored oils, most of which we had a chance to sample and enjoy at their facility; Tasmania, Australia

 

The entrance to Ghost Rock Winery facility and tasting room and restaurant, across from some of their vineyards, has several large “ghost rocks”; Tasmania, Australia

The entrance to Ghost Rock Winery facility and tasting room and restaurant, across from some of their vineyards, has several large “ghost rocks”; Tasmania, Australia

 

“Nestled among the rolling patchwork fields of the beautiful coastline of Northern Tasmania, you’ll find Ghost Rock among some of god’s best country.  Just 10 minutes from where the Spirit of Tasmania docks and one hour from Cradle Mountain or Launceston, this is a must visit destination when exploring the central North coast of Tasmania or more fondly known as the Cradle Coast Region.  The modern and vibrant Cellar Door & Eatery – twice crowned Tourism Tasmania’s ‘Best Cellar Door’ – offers wine tastings of Ghost Rock’s entire range and a lunch/grazing menu featuring local artisan produce.  With striking views over its vineyards, rolling countryside and Bass Strait, it’s easy to see why it’s a popular hangout.  One of the coolest wine regions in the State (and most probably Australia), it’s one of the State’s most unique wine experiences.  We love living where we do and would love to share this part of the world with you. We look forward to welcoming you soon. — Ghost Rock Team” — www.ghostrock.com.au

 

Vineyards at Ghost Rock Winery overlooking (to the north) the ocean and, beyond that, mainland Australia; Tasmania, Australia

Vineyards at Ghost Rock Winery overlooking (to the north) the ocean and, beyond that, mainland Australia; Tasmania, Australia

 

At our wine tasting at Ghost Rock Winery (before lunch) we had the opportunity to taste some of their rose, white and red wines; Tasmania, Australia

At our wine tasting at Ghost Rock Winery (before lunch) we had the opportunity to taste some of their rose, white and red wines; Tasmania, Australia

 

The tasting room at Anvers Confectionery where we had the opportunity to taste the broad range of chocolates and confections made in the factory, across the parking lot; Tasmania, Australia

The tasting room at Anvers Confectionery where we had the opportunity to taste the broad range of chocolates and confections made in the factory, across the parking lot; Tasmania, Australia

 

“Anvers Confectionery was established as a cottage industry in November 1989, by Igor Van Gerwen, who came to Australia from Belgium.  During his six years as a student at the Institute of Foodstuffs in Antwerp, Belgium, and by working for some of the finest patisseries in the Flemish and Walloon regions, Igor learnt, amongst other culinary skills, the art of handling chocolate.  He was trained by Roger Geerts, world renowned confectioner and author of “Belgian Pralines”.  To guarantee the quality of his products, Igor not only has to painstakingly train his staff in the art of manipulating chocolate, but also to continuously source the finest ingredients.  Not only does he use fresh Tasmanian cream, pure butter, exquisite liquors and natural flavours, but also the world’s finest chocolate… Igor has found the Tasmanian cream and butter to be the richest in flavour of any in the world, ideally suited for truffles and fudge. He believes the reason for this is that the pastures in Tasmania’s pure environment stay green almost all year round, eliminating the need to feed the dairy cows on grains.” – www.anvers-chocolate.com.au/

 

We enjoyed a tour of the Anvers Confectionary factory given by its founder and chocolatier, Igor Van Gerwen, who came to Australia from Belgium decades ago, and enjoyed some hot chocolate and house-made pastries; Tasmania, Australia

We enjoyed a tour of the Anvers Confectionary factory given by its founder and chocolatier, Igor Van Gerwen, who came to Australia from Belgium decades ago, and enjoyed some hot chocolate and house-made pastries; Tasmania, Australia

 

Apples growing in one of many orchards at the Spreyton Cider Company’s manufacturing facility (and tasting room) for their award-winning Tasmanian ciders; Tasmania, Australia

Apples growing in one of many orchards at the Spreyton Cider Company’s manufacturing facility (and tasting room) for their award-winning Tasmanian ciders; Tasmania, Australia

 

“Spreyton has been home to our families since the mid 1800’s, and since 1908 we have been growing apples in this picturesque valley. For four generations we have grown the highest quality fruit for the people of Tasmania and the world.  When Spreyton Fresh – the parent of Spreyton Cider Co, was established in 1998 to begin making fresh apple juice, Spreyton also became synonymous with fantastic real apple juice that tasted like apples!  In 2011 it was time for the next step and Spreyton Fresh began experimenting with their first cider ferments and on the strength of those early experiments the Spreyton Cider Co. was launched.  The company made the decision to keep the entire cider production process in house as that was the only way to ensure that our products would be made with the quality and integrity that is central to everything we do.  So in 2012 we began construction of our cider manufacturing facility and cellar door, and employed a full-time cider maker.  Since inception, Spreyton Cider Company has won numerous awards for our cider in competitions all over Australia.  We have continued to develop the craft cider category by growing “cider specific” varieties of apples that will further improve the traditional ciders that we produce.  At Spreyton we are serious about real cider made from real apples and use both traditional and more contemporary techniques to ensure the quality of what we produce.  Spreyton is now not only home to great Tasmanian Apples and Fresh Apple juice it is also home for one of the few true tree-to-bottle cider producers in Australia.” — www.spreytonciderco.com.au

 

At our tasting at the Spreyton Cider Company, we had the opportunity to taste not only their delicious apple juice, but also their ciders and ginger beer – a nice ending to a full day of exploration and tastings; Tasmania, Australia

At our tasting at the Spreyton Cider Company, we had the opportunity to taste not only their delicious apple juice, but also their ciders and ginger beer – a nice ending to a full day of exploration and tastings; Tasmania, Australia

This blog post wraps up our two month journey aboard our ship from Hong Kong on New Years Day through our Raja Ampat expedition and then a semi-circumnavigation of Australia, from Darwin, through the Great Barrier Reef on to Sydney, and wrapping up in Tasmania.  Fortunately we flew back from Melbourne, Australia, just before the coronavirus pandemic shelter-in-place orders were mandated in the San Francisco Bay Area, where we live.  Until we catch up again, stay safe and stay healthy…

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2020 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

 

Burnie, Tasmania, Australia (2020)

A beautiful older building in downtown Burnie, Tasmania, a city of about 20,000 that lies on the north west coast of the island, south of the Australian mainland

A beautiful older building in downtown Burnie, Tasmania, a city of about 20,000 that lies on the north west coast of the island, south of the Australian mainland

 

“The city of Burnie, situated on the North West Coast of the island state of Tasmania, is located south east of the Australian mainland.  Tasmania’s most westerly city, it has a northerly aspect and is nestled around Emu Bay on Bass Strait, a 40-minute drive from the city of Devonport.  The city’s 20,000 residents enjoy a vibrant shopping district that spills onto the beach for seafood and coffee.  Burnie has surprising restaurants and cafes to linger in.  It has a dynamic cultural life, galleries, performances, exhibitions and community events.  Fantastic food is manufactured in Burnie like whisky and cheese.  The best milk in the world for cheese making is produced in the area.  There are well stocked deli’s to tempt you with gourmet treats.  Burnie’s hills hide impressive gardens and parks, and it is surrounded by beautiful beaches, sparkling water and fresh air.  In some areas people live in perfect art deco or federation homes and public spaces featuring buildings by contemporary Tasmanian architects and designers.” — http://www.discoverburnie.net

 

Wilkinson’s Pharmacy operates in a nicely restored historic building in downtown Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

Wilkinson’s Pharmacy operates in a nicely restored historic building in downtown Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

 

After an excellent seafood luncheon at Fish Frenzy, overlooking Burnie Beach, we had a stroll outside; Burnie Beach is at the northern edge of the downtown district in Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

After an excellent seafood luncheon at Fish Frenzy, overlooking Burnie Beach, we had a stroll outside; Burnie Beach is at the northern edge of the downtown district in Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

 

“Emu Bay, the distant Bass Strait and the town’s proximity to the Australian mainland made Burnie uniquely perfect for an industrial port.  Nearby forestry also made Burnie the perfect place for the paper mill industry.  But the industrial port is only a part of Burnie’s past as the town has found a way to reinvent itself.   Now, this coastal gem is full of makers.  The beating heart of this artistic community is the Maker’s Workshop which is part museum, gallery, workshop and arts center.  It’s a wonderful place to visit where you can learn to make paper, blow glass, create ceramics, develop textiles or learn to paint, sculpt or draw.” – www.tasmania.com/points-of-interest/burnie/

 

A “Surf Rescue” vehicle at Burnie Beach, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

A “Surf Rescue” vehicle at Burnie Beach, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

 

The Burnie Beach rescue boat, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

The Burnie Beach rescue boat, Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

 

These children friendly octopus sculptures are on Burnie Beach, just outside the patio of Fish Frenzy; Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

These children friendly octopus sculptures are on Burnie Beach, just outside the patio of Fish Frenzy; Burnie, Tasmania, Australia

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2020 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (2020)

Our favorite seafood retailer at the Sydney Fish Market is Peter’s Sydney Fish Market; Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Our favorite seafood retailer at the Sydney Fish Market is Peter’s Sydney Fish Market; Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Our favorite food shopping in Sydney is at the Sydney Fish Market on Blackwattle Bay near the eastern end of Anzac Bridge, not far from where we were docked at White Bay.   Sydney Fish Market’s six seafood retailers offer Australia’s biggest variety of fresh seafood.  The site also features numerous restaurants and cafés, a bakery, butcher, gourmet deli, greengrocer, bottle shop, fishing supplies store and gift shop.  We went in the late morning to purchase fresh fish and seafood (some to be frozen for cooking in the future) and then sat at side tables at Peter’s Sydney Fish Market for a light lunch, all fresh fish and seafood from Peter’s Market (see the last photograph, below).

 

The sushi grade scampi taste as good as they look!; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

The sushi grade scampi taste as good as they look!; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

 

Note that all prices are Australian dollars per kilogram (2.2 pounds).  At the time of our visit this winter, one Australian dollar had an exchange rate of $0.66 US.  Thus seafood costing AU$40 per kilo was equivalent to US$12 per pound.

 

Cooked Eastern rock lobsters were high priced, but were tasty, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

Cooked Eastern rock lobsters were high priced, but were tasty, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

 

Peter’s Sydney Fish Market sells a wide variety of fresh fish, mostly from local waters but extending around the coast of Australia and Tasmania; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Peter’s Sydney Fish Market sells a wide variety of fresh fish, mostly from local waters but extending around the coast of Australia and Tasmania; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

We bought some of the extra-large green wild tiger prawns to boil and then eat for lunch as a “shrimp-a-peel” back on the ship; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

We bought some of the extra-large green wild tiger prawns to boil and then eat for lunch as a “shrimp-a-peel” back on the ship; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

“Sydney Fish Market (SFM) is the largest market of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere and the world’s second largest seafood market in terms of variety outside of Japan.  A working fish market, SFM sources product both nationally and internationally and trades over 14,500 tonnes of seafood annually — with up to a hundred species traded every day.  SFM employs approximately fifty-seven staff to organise the weekday wholesale auction, promote Sydney Fish Market as the centre of seafood excellence and operate the Sydney Seafood School.  Since opening in 1989, Sydney Seafood School has played an important part in persuading Sydney residents to eat more fish.  The School is considered to be one of Australia’s leading cooking schools.” — www.tripadvisor.com

 

Extra large (cooked) tiger prawns, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Extra-large (cooked) tiger prawns, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Octopus, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Octopus, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Calamari, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Calamari, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Yellow fin bream, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Yellow fin bream, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Live marron, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia -- Marron is a name given to two closely related species of crayfish in Western Australia

Live marron, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia — marron is a name given to two closely related species of crayfish in Western Australia

 

For lunch at Peter’s Sydney Fish Market, we each started with one half of a cooked lobster and a sushi grade scampi, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

For lunch at Peter’s Sydney Fish Market, we each started with one half of a cooked lobster and a sushi grade scampi, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2020 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.