Helicopter Flight above Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #1 – the town of Pond Inlet is in the foreground, with Bylot Island with the mountain glaciers in the distance, across Navy Board Inlet

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #1 – the town of Pond Inlet is in the foreground, with Bylot Island with the mountain glaciers in the distance, across Navy Board Inlet

 

Pond Inlet is located on the northeastern coast of Baffin Island, Canada, on the shores of Navy Board Inlet with Bylot Island across the Inlet.  Our flight took us part way down Navy Board Inlet and then to the west, climbing up over the 5,000-foot high cliffs for amazing views of the glaciers on the interior of Baffin Island.  Our return flight to the ship, anchored in Navy Board Inlet, gave us fantastic views of Pond Inlet and the surrounding area.  Note that Pond Inlet is a jumping off point for many ships embarking on the East to West transit of the Northwest Passage – this summer the town expected to receive 22 cruise and exploration ships (including our ship, which is technically a private residential yacht with an ice-hardened hull, enabling us to make the transit WITHOUT the assistance of an ice breaker – in both 2012 and 2019).

 

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2 – the view flying S.E. out of Pond Inlet, showing the barren cliffs of Baffin Island fronting on the water (Navy Board Inlet)

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2 – the view flying S.E. out of Pond Inlet, showing the barren cliffs of Baffin Island fronting on the water (Navy Board Inlet)

 

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3 – looking across the Baffin Island cliffs to Bylot Island (the southern tip of the island is visible on the far right in the background)

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3 – looking across the Baffin Island cliffs to Bylot Island (the southern tip of the island is visible on the far right in the background)

 

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #4 – the transition is quite stark at the top of the cliffs from the barren soil and verticality of the cliffs fronting the waterfront to the numerous glaciers on the top of Baffin Island

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #4 – the transition is quite stark at the top of the cliffs from the barren soil and verticality of the cliffs fronting the waterfront to the numerous glaciers on the top of Baffin Island as we flew inland (to the west)

 

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #5 – a two-photograph panorama of the Baffin Island interior glaciers; notice the curvature of the earth!

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #5 – a two-photograph panorama of the Baffin Island interior glaciers; notice the curvature of the earth!

 

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #6 – more glaciers were visible for a great distance as we flew north over the interior of Baffin Island (south of Pond Inlet)

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #6 – more glaciers were visible for a great distance as we flew north over the interior of Baffin Island (south of Pond Inlet)

 

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #7 – flying back to Pond Inlet and the landing pad on the front of our ship

Aerial photo, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #7 – flying back to Pond Inlet and the landing pad on the bow (fore/front) of our ship

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

An aerial view of our ship anchored in Navy Board Inlet, between Bylot Island, with the high mountain glaciers, in the distance and the town of Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, on the water (center foreground)

An aerial view of our ship anchored in Navy Board Inlet, between Bylot Island, with the high mountain glaciers, in the distance and the town of Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, on the water (center foreground)

 

The community of Pond Inlet is located on the northeastern coast of Baffin Island, Canada, on the shores of Navy Board Inlet.  With a population of approximately 1,800, Pond Inlet is the largest of the four Canadian Arctic hamlets above the 72nd parallel.  The settlement is known to the Inuit as Mittimatalik (the place where Mittima is buried).  Although the name remains, the identity of Mittima is a mystery to present-day residents.  Pond Inlet is one of Nunavut’s most scenic locations with fantastic views across the iceberg-strewn channel to the mountains and glaciers of Bylot Island.  It is predominantly a community of hunters, with the government as the largest employer in town.  In January to March average temperatures hover around -25 degrees Celsius (-13 degrees Fahrenheit), although recent winters have tended to be somewhat warmer and drier.  In summer, with an average temperature of 7-10 degrees Celsius (45-50 degrees F), the sun shines up to 21 hours a day.  Pond Inlet is the gateway to the wild and mostly-uninhabited High Arctic Islands to the north.

 

We had the opportunity to enjoy a cultural performance in the Pond Inlet Community Center which featured Inuit dancing, drumming, singing, throat singing and ceremonial mock fighting.  Many local artists had their works for sale at the Visitor’s Center.

 

A view of some of the homes in Pond Inlet looking downhill from the new Community Center towards Navy Board Inlet (with Bylot Island across the water), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

A view of some of the homes in Pond Inlet looking downhill from the new Community Center towards Navy Board Inlet (with Bylot Island across the water), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

A restored old sod Inuit home, built into the ground with a stitched seal fur roof supported by wooden poles and beams, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada; Bylot Island is visible across the waters of Navy Board Inlet

A restored old sod Inuit home, built into the ground with a stitched seal fur roof supported by wooden poles and beams, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada; Bylot Island is visible across the waters of Navy Board Inlet

 

A considerable contrast between the Pond Inlet Inuit sod home of a few hundred years ago and the modern comforts of an ocean going ship, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

A considerable contrast between the Pond Inlet Inuit sod home of a few hundred years ago and the modern comforts of an ocean going ship, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

A typical Inuit wooden sled (or sledge) pulled by dogs – Inuits have bred dogs for pulling sleds for over 4,000 years in the Arctic; the “box” on top of the sled provides some wind and snow protection for a traveling family on the sled in the winter

A typical Inuit wooden sled (or sledge) pulled by dogs – Inuits have bred dogs for pulling sleds for over 4,000 years in the Arctic; the “box” on top of the sled provides some wind and snow protection for a traveling family on the sled in the winter; Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

Typical individual family homes in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Typical individual family homes in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

Local Inuit artwork decorating window board coverings on a home in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Local Inuit artwork decorating window board coverings on a home in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

The modern building on the right is one of the bed and breakfast inns in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

The modern building on the right is one of the bed and breakfast inns in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

The recently constructed community library and Pond Inlet Museum was designed to resemble an iceberg in appearance, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

The recently constructed community library and Pond Inlet Museum was designed to resemble an iceberg in appearance, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

Narwhal whales decorate a plaque outside the community library, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada [The narwhal, or narwhale, is a medium-sized toothed whale that possesses a large "tusk" from a protruding canine tooth.]

Narwhal whales decorate a plaque outside the community library, Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada [The narwhal, or narwhale, is a medium-sized toothed whale that possesses a large “tusk” from a protruding canine tooth. It lives year-round in the Arctic waters around Greenland, Canada, and Russia. Protected now, they were heavily hunted for their tusks which gave rise to the myth of the unicorn. They are often referred to as the “unicorn of the sea”.]

A sled and sled dog among the items on display in the Pond Inlet Museum in the Community Library; Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

A sled and sled dog among the items on display in the Pond Inlet Museum in the Community Library; Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

The recently built Community Center at the edge of town in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

The recently built Community Center at the edge of town in Pond Inlet, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

As pictured below, the official flag of Nunavut was proclaimed on 1 April 1999, along with the territory of Nunavut in Canada.  It features a red inuksuk — a traditional Inuit land marker — and a blue star, which represents the Niqirtsuituq, the North Star, and the leadership of elders in the community.

 

Local Inuit women and children who performed in the cultural performances at the Pond Inlet Community Center for us – shown holding the flag of the Nunavut Territory, Canada

Local Inuit women and children who performed in the cultural performances at the Pond Inlet Community Center for us – shown holding the flag of the Nunavut Territory, Canada

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Helicopter Flight above Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Aerial photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #1 – our ship in the fjord as seen a few minutes after lifting off from Deck 7 for our scenic helicopter flight and landing on the top of one of the 5,500 feet high cliffs

Aerial photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #1 – our ship in the fjord as seen a few minutes after lifting off from Deck 7 for our scenic helicopter flight and landing on the top of one of the 5,500 feet high cliffs

 

Our flight over Feacham Bay [see our previous blog, “Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada“] took us past tall, weather-worn cliffs and then up to a cliff top landing spot.  From our “perch” at 5,500 feet (1,676 meters) elevation, we were able to enjoy the spectacular views up and down the fjord in the late afternoon light and then, turning around and walking a short distance over the rocky terrain, find views of glaciers in the interior of Baffin Island.

 

Aerial photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2 – note that the cliffs abutting the water on the east coast of Baffin Island have virtually no snow nor glaciers in the summer these days

Aerial photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2 – note that the cliffs abutting the water on the east coast of Baffin Island have virtually no snow nor glaciers in the summer these days, a consequence of global warming

 

Aerial photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3 – this glacier is melting, but still hugging the mountains inland of the east coast of Baffin Island

Aerial photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3 – this glacier is melting, but still hugging the mountains inland of the east coast of Baffin Island

 

Panorama taken on a cliff top of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #1 – notice the contrast between the dry, barren fjord cliffs and the snow and glaciers inland

Panorama taken on a cliff top of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #1 – notice the contrast between the dry, barren fjord cliffs and the snow and glaciers inland

 

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2 – the intrepid explorer and your blogger at an elevation of 5,500 feet overlooking the spectacular fjord after disembarking from our helicopter on the cliff top

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2 – the intrepid explorer and your blogger at an elevation of 5,500 feet overlooking the spectacular fjord after disembarking from our helicopter on the cliff top

 

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3 – a view of the fjord

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3 – a view of the fjord

 

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #4 – note how sheer some of the cliffs fronting the fjord are

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #4 – note how sheer some of the cliffs fronting the fjord are

 

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #5 – late afternoon sun illuminating the inland glaciers (black and white)

PHOTO Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #5 – late afternoon sun illuminating the inland glaciers (black and white)

 

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #6 – a close up of some of the glaciers across the fjord from our helicopter landing spot (black and white)

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #6 – a close up of some of the glaciers across the fjord from our helicopter landing spot (black and white)

 

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #7 – after turning my back to the fjord, a photograph made of the interior glaciers with the cliff top rocks in the foreground (black and white)

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #7 – after turning my back to the fjord, a photograph made of the interior glaciers with the cliff top rocks in the foreground (black and white)

 

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #8 – after a half-hour in the breezy, cold pure air on the cliff top – it’s summertime! -- we were happy to welcome our “ride” back to our home on the ship!

Cliff top photo of Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #8 – after a half-hour in the breezy, cold pure air on the cliff top – it’s summertime! — we were happy to welcome our “ride” back to our home on the ship!

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Our ship anchored in Feacham Bay off Buchan Gulf, further north on Baffin Island, Canada, from our prior anchorage in San Ford Fjord -- Buchan Gulf, surrounded by tall, weather-worn cliffs

Our ship anchored in Feacham Bay off Buchan Gulf, further north on Baffin Island, Canada, from our prior anchorage in San Ford Fjord — Buchan Gulf, surrounded by tall, weather-worn cliffs, is about 200 kilometers (120 miles) south of the Inuit settlement town of Pond Inlet

 

From San Ford Fjord on Baffin Island, we sailed north overnight and the next morning we anchored in Feacham Bay off Buchan Gulf, further north on Baffin Island, Canada.  Buchan Gulf, surrounded by tall, weather-worn cliffs, is about 200 kilometers (120 miles) south of the Inuit settlement town of Pond Inlet [see an upcoming blog].  The Feacham Bay area, where we went ashore, was home to a small community of Thule natives (ancestors of all modern Inuit) around 500 years ago, with the remains of three semi-subterranean round homes built in the traditional Thule style still remaining above the beach.  The tundra was very rich in flora, but all plants were quite small and low to the ground in order to survive in the harsh and strong winds as well as the 8-9 months of snow and ice on the ground.

 

The beach where we did a Zodiac landing for a hike was strewn with debris left from settlements and short-term summer stays, Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

The beach where we did a Zodiac landing for a hike was strewn with debris left from settlements and short-term summer stays, Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

The remains of a large canoe that supported two outboard motors (indicating it was from the 20th century) on the beach at Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada; the “carcass” looks like a fish skeleton

The remains of a large canoe that supported two outboard motors (indicating it was from the 20th century) on the beach at Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada; the “carcass” looks like a fish skeleton

 

The dugout remains and stone walls of one of three Thule semi-subterranean round homes built in the traditional Thule style still remaining on the beach; our naturalist told us they are about 500 years old, and still in good condition

The dugout remains and stone walls of one of three Thule semi-subterranean round homes built in the traditional Thule style still remaining on the beach; our naturalist told us they are about 500 years old, and still in good condition; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

Our coastal hike took us over varied terrain, with the hillside littered with large stones dragged down by glaciers (moraine) and below that tundra and bogs and pools of water that were difficult to walk through; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf

Our coastal hike took us over varied terrain, with the hillside littered with large stones dragged down by glaciers (moraine) and below that tundra and bogs and pools of water that were difficult to walk through; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

So called “Arctic cotton” plants (Eriophorum callitrix) were scattered over the tundra; according to our Inuit guide, the “cotton”, one of the most widespread flowering plants in the northern tundra regions, was picked by Inuits to use as wicks

So called “Arctic cotton” plants (Eriophorum callitrix) were scattered over the tundra; according to our Inuit guide, the “cotton”, one of the most widespread flowering plants in the northern tundra regions, was picked by Inuits to use as wicks in whale and seal oil lamps for light in their homes; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

A dwarf Arctic tundra willow tree (yes, the bush pictured is a tree!), which grows close to the ground (tundra) and normally spreads laterally, rather than vertically, due to the high Arctic winds

A dwarf Arctic tundra willow tree (yes, the bush pictured is a tree!), which grows close to the ground (tundra) and normally spreads laterally, rather than vertically, due to the high Arctic winds; our naturalist said this tree, growing in the lee shelter of the large boulder, is the largest he has seen on Baffin Island; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

Wild mushrooms growing in the moist tundra; our Inuit guide says almost all tundra mushrooms are eaten by the Inuit; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

Wild mushrooms growing in the moist tundra; our Inuit guide says almost all tundra mushrooms are eaten by the Inuit; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

This wetland bog, with beautiful mosses, was one of many that we had to walk around on our hike through the tundra below the solid ground and stone moraine of the higher grounl; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

This wetland bog, with beautiful mosses, was one of many that we had to walk around on our hike through the tundra below the solid ground and stone moraine of the higher grounl; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

These wild blueberries were almost at the peak of flavor just before the end of the brief summer season; our Inuit guide noted that they are picked and eaten by the Inuit who savor the fresh berries for just a short period each year

These wild blueberries, growing on the tundra, were almost at the peak of flavor just before the end of the brief summer season; our Inuit guide noted that they are picked and eaten by the Inuit who savor the fresh berries for just a short period each year; Feacham Bay, Buchan Gulf, Baffin Island, Canada

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

 

Helicopter Flight above Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

The cliffs and glaciers of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) on the northeast side of Canada’s Baffin Island in the Arctic Territory of Nunavut, as seen from an upper deck of our ship

The cliffs and glaciers of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) on the northeast side of Canada’s Baffin Island in the Arctic Territory of Nunavut, as seen from an upper deck of our ship

 

One of the great experiences on our expedition through the Northwest Passage this summer was taking helicopter flights over regions that we sailed through.  Our first flight was after our brief stop at Clyde River in southern Baffin Island in the territory of Nunavut, Canada, in the eastern region of the Canadian Arctic, where the helicopter joined our ship on deck 7’s forward helicopter pad.  Shown below are some photos of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) from the ship before our helicopter ride and a photo from our apartment’s deck as we sailed out of the fjord.  The fjord is highly regarded for the harsh beauty of its landscapes with rocky cliffs rising steeply from the shore.  The fjord is 110 kilometers (68 miles) long.  Above the cliffs are numerous glaciers which we flew over (and photographed).  The cliffs rise steeply (some go straight up) from the fjord’s shores to heights up to 1,500 meters (4,900 feet) above sea level.

 

“Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) lies on Baffin Island’s northeastern coast in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Nunavut.  It was named in memory of Sam Ford.  Ford is recognized as Canada’s most outstanding Inuk linguist and died tragically in a helicopter crash.  The Inuit settlement of Pond Inlet is 320 km to the northwest. Sam Ford Fjord is a traditional hunting area for the Inuit.” — https://canadac3.ca/en/expedition/the-places/sam-ford-fiord/

 

A close up of a glacier flowing down to Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) on the northeast side of Canada’s Baffin Island in the Arctic Territory of Nunavut

A close up of a glacier flowing down to Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) on the northeast side of Canada’s Baffin Island in the Arctic Territory of Nunavut

 

Our ship’s helicopter just before boarding and our take off to explore Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Our ship’s helicopter just before boarding and our take off to explore Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

A photograph of our ship in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), taken from the helicopter as we flew further into the fjord, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

A photograph of our ship in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), taken from the helicopter as we flew further into the fjord, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #2

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #3 — take away the water and the ice and the rock formations look like some areas in the Southwest of the United States

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #4

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #4

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #5

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #5

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #6

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #6

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #7

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #7

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #8

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #8

 

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #10

Aerial photo of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, #9

 

The rock face of one of the sheer cliffs in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, as seen on a Zodiac cruise through the fjord from our ship (in the afternoon, after the helicopter flight)

The rock face of one of the sheer cliffs in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, as seen on a Zodiac cruise through the fjord from our ship (in the afternoon, after the helicopter flight)

 

A hanging glacier flowing down one of the sheer cliffs in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, with melt water from under the glacier exiting into the fjord as a thundering, large waterfall

A hanging glacier flowing down one of the sheer cliffs in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada, with melt water from under the glacier exiting into the fjord as a thundering, large waterfall, as seen on a Zodiac cruise through the fjord from our ship

 

A close up of the hanging glacier and its waterfall flowing down one of the sheer cliffs (above) in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

A close up of the hanging glacier and its waterfall flowing down one of the sheer cliffs (above) in Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti), Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

The view of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) from our apartment’s deck as we sailed out of the fjord, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

The view of Sam Ford Fjord (Kangiqtualuk Uqquqti) from our apartment’s deck as we sailed out of the fjord, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.