Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), the southernmost tip in South America, Chile

Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), the southernmost tip of South America, Chile

 

We were very surprised to wake up on our last day at sea on our Antarctic journey (in a fortuitously very calm crossing of the Drake Passage between the Antarctic Peninsula and South America) to find out that the weather and wind conditions were excellent around Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile, so that we would be able to make a rare Zodiac landing on the island. 

Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile, is the southernmost tip of South America and the Western Hemisphere.  It remains a maritime legend to this day, as sailing around this remote point and then through the Drake Passage was (and is) one of the most challenging nautical routes on the planet.  The violent stretch of chaotic water between Antarctica and South America, one frequented by icebergs, huge waves and plagued by gale-force winds, is crossed by sailors with great trepidation.  Many still prefer to use the sheltered Strait of Magellan, to the north of Ushuaia, Argentina.

 

Navigation map with Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn) on the bottom center (with several purple stamps around it), Chile

Navigation map with Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn) on the bottom center (with several purple stamps around it), Chile

“Cape Horn marks the northern boundary of the Drake Passage and marks where the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans collide.  For decades it was a major milestone on the clipper route, by which sailing ships carried trade around the world.  The waters around Cape Horn are particularly hazardous, owing to strong winds, large waves, strong currents and icebergs; these dangers have made it notorious as a sailors’ graveyard.  The need for ships to round Cape Horn was greatly reduced by the opening of the Panama Canal in 1914.  Sailing around the Horn is widely regarded as one of the major challenges in yachting.” — Wikipedia 

 

Walkway stairs from the beach landing, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

Walkway stairs from the beach landing, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

"to all our passages of the cape", Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

“to all our passages of the cape”, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

Monumento Cabo de Hornos (Albatros Monument), Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

Monumento Cabo de Hornos (Albatros Monument), Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

“The cape lies within what are now Chilean territorial waters, and the Chilean Navy maintains a station on Hoorn Island, consisting of a residence, utility building, chapel, and lighthouse.  A short distance from the main station is a memorial, including a large sculpture made by Chilean sculptor Jose Balcells featuring the silhouette of an albatross, in remembrance of the sailors who died while attempting to “round the Horn”.  It was erected in 1992 through the initiative of the Chilean Section of the Cape Horn Captains Brotherhood.  The terrain is entirely treeless, although quite lush owing to frequent precipitation.” — Wikipedia 

 

Lighthouse ladder to the light, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

Lighthouse ladder to the light, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

 

Wooden church, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

Wooden church, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

Virgen del Carmen and tulips in the old wooden church, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

 

Wooden church siding, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

Wooden church siding, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

Cape Horn was our last landfall before sailing north to the eastern entrance of the Beagle Channel, from which point we sailed west back to our starting point for this voyage, Ushuaia, Argentina.  The landscape, waters, icebergs, glaciers, penguins, birds, historic settlements, and highly changeable weather left permanent impressions on all of our fortunate small group of “explorers” on this voyage.   Fortunately we were able to capture much of this through photography and videography. 

Visiting Antarctica is a trip of a lifetime and not to be missed.  Put it on your bucket list!

 

Our ship framed by the window in the old wooden church, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

Our ship framed by the window in the old wooden church, Cabo de Hornos (Cape Horn), Chile

 

Keats Glacier, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

A panorama of Keats Glacier, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

A panorama of Keats Glacier, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chilev

TAlberto de Agostini National Park is a Protected Area created on land that was formerly part of “Hollanda” forest reserve and “Hernando de Magallanes National Park” [in Chilean Patagonia]. It covers 5,637 square miles (14,600 km2) and includes the Cordiller Darwin mountain range, which is the final land-based stretch of the Andes before it becomes a chain of mountains appearing as small islands that sink into the Pacific Ocean and the Beagle Channel.” — Wikipedia

Keats Glacier flowing down into Keats Sound, near d’Agostini Sound, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Keats Glacier flowing down into Keats Sound, near d’Agostini Sound, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

“The park, along with Cabo de Hornos National Park, was designated a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 2005. As part of the Magallanes Sub-Polar (or Sub-Antarctic) Evergreen Rainforest, UNESCO highlights the area’s ‘mosaic of contrasting ecosystems and unique and singular characteristics on a world level.’ Several tidewater glaciers and steep fjords can be found in the park.” — Wikipedia

Waterfalls of melting mountain snow flowing into Keats Sound, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Waterfalls of melting mountain snow flowing into Keats Sound, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

 

Sailing thorugh d’Agostini Sound on the way to the Beagle Channel and Ushuaia, Argentina, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Sailing through d’Agostini Sound on the way to the Beagle Channel and Ushuaia, Argentina, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Patagonia, Chile

 

 

Amalia Glacier (also known as Skua Glacier), Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Our first panoramic view of Amalia Glacier, also known as Skua Glacier, from our Zodiac inflatable boat, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Our first panoramic view of Amalia Glacier, also known as Skua Glacier, from our Zodiac inflatable boat, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Amalia Glacier, also known as Skua Glacier, is a tidewater glacier located in Bernardo O’Higgins Narional Park on the edge of the Sarmiento Channel.  The glacier originates in the Southern Patagonian Ice Field.  From 1945 to 1986, its terminus retreated 4.3 miles (7 km), being, along with the recession of the O’Higgins Glacier, the most dramatic retreat of the glaciers of the mentioned icefield during that period.” —Wikipedia

The ice looks blue on a section of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

The ice looks blue on a section of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

For answers to the question, “Why is glacier ice blue?”, see our previous blog post on the Pio XI Glacier.

The weather has sculpted the surface of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

The weather has sculpted the surface of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Glacial ice sculptures carved on the top of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile--

Glacial ice sculptures carved on the top of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Calving (a large portion of a glacier breaking away and falling) at Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Calving (a large portion of a glacier breaking away and falling) at Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Nearly frozen ocean, icebergs, and “cliffs” at the face of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Nearly frozen ocean, icebergs, and “cliffs” at the face of Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

The glacier (solid ice and snow) literally flowing down into the Pacific Ocean; Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

The glacier (solid ice and snow) literally flowing down into the Pacific Ocean; Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

 

Rock islands with vegetation and ice floes, seen from the Zodiac as we headed back to the ship from Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Rock islands with vegetation and ice floes, seen from the Zodiac as we headed back to the ship from Amalia (or Skua) Glacier, Amalia Sound, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Pio XI Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Sailing through the fjords in Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, approaching the Pio XI Glacier, Patagonia, Chile

Sailing through the fjords in Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, approaching the Pio XI Glacier, Patagonia, Chile

One of the first large icebergs we saw sailing through the fjords in Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

One of the first large icebergs we saw sailing through the fjords in Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

“The glaciers of Chile cover 2.7%, equal to 7,795 square miles (20,188 km2) of the land area of the country, excluding Antarctica Chilena, and have a considerable impact on its landscape and water supply. By surface 80% of South America’s glaciers lie in Chile. The largest glaciers of Chile are the Northern and Southern Patagonian Ice Fields. From a latitude of 47° S and south some glaciers reach sea level.” – Wikipedia

Cruising in one of the ship’s Zodiac inflatable boats, our first perspective view of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Cruising in one of the ship’s Zodiac inflatable boats, our first perspective view of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Located in Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Pio XI Glacier – named after Pope Pius the 11th — (also know as Brüggen Glacier, named after the German geologist Juan Brüggen Messtorff) is the biggest glacier in South America, now about 41 miles (66 km) in length. To put it in perspective, Pio XI is as big as Santiago, with a surface of 488 square miles (1,265 square kilometers), which grows 164 feet (50 meters) in height, length and density every day. This is a unique quality, as all the other glaciers in Patagonia and in most areas of the world are losing mass (due to a combination of melting and less new snow accumulation), whereas Pio XI keeps growing everyday.

A view the blue reflections from the ice on a section of the top of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

A view the blue reflections from the ice on a section of the top of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Almost everyone, upon seeing their first glacier (or large iceberg) asks, “Why is glacier ice blue?”  For the answer, we checked in with the Alaska Satellite Facility: “Glacial ice is a different color from regular ice.  It is so blue because the dense ice of the glacier absorbs every other color of the spectrum except blue – so blue is what we see!  Sometimes the glacial ice appears almost turquoise.  Its crystalline structure strongly scatters blue light. The ice on a glacier has been there for a really long time and has been compacted down so that its structure is pretty different from the ice you normally see.  Glacial ice is a lot different from the frozen water you get out of the freezer.  Glacial ice is not just frozen compacted snow.  There are other things in the ice that make it much different from the ice in your home.  Glaciers move through rock and soil as they carve their way down a slope.  This means the ice is going to have a lot more ingredients than just water.

“What would happen if you broke off a big chunk of ice from a glacier and put it in your glass of water?  Would it be any different from the ice in your freezer at home?  What would happen to all those air bubbles that have been trapped under pressure? 1) If your chunk of glacial ice melted in your glass of water, you would have dirt, gravel, and even organic matter [living stuff] in your water. 2) All those pressurized air bubbles would rush out so fast that they might explode your glass.”

A view of the extreme weathering of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile--

A view of the extreme weathering of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile–

 

Four of the ship’s Zodiac inflatable boats heading in for closer views of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Four of the ship’s Zodiac inflatable boats heading in for closer views of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Here you can see how the glacier (solid ice and snow) literally flows down to the Pacific Ocean over the permanent rocks & land;  Pio XI Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Here you can see how the glacier (solid ice and snow) literally flows down to the Pacific Ocean over the permanent rocks & land; Pio XI Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

 

 

Glacial ice sculptures carved by the weather on the top of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Glacial ice sculptures carved by the weather on the top of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

 

Our last panoramic view of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, from our Zodiac inflatable boat as we headed back to the ship, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Our last panoramic view of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, from our Zodiac inflatable boat as we headed back to the ship, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

 

 

A Zodiac inflatable boat heading back to the ship, zigzagging through the icebergs in front of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

A Zodiac inflatable boat heading back to the ship, zigzagging through the icebergs in front of Pio XI Glacier, also know as Brüggen Glacier, Bernardo O´Higgins National Park, Patagonia, Chile

 

Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

The Arrayán tree, commonly known as Chilean myrtle, is native to the Andes and was found throughout Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

The Arrayán tree, commonly known as Chilean myrtle, is native to the Andes and was found throughout Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Parque Aiken del Sur (Aiken del Sur National Park), a privately owned 618-acre (250-hectare) nature preserve and botanical garden, is a short 15-minute drive from the port of Puerto Chacabuco, Chile in the Chilean Patagonia region.  The park has several hiking trails, including the nature trail to Lago Riesco (Riesco Lake), which we walked with a local nature guide.

The Arrayán tree, commonly known as Chilean myrtle (Latin: luma apiculata) is native to the Andes and was found throughout Parque Aiken del Sur on our nature hike.  “Its trunk appears twisted and contorted and has smooth bark, coloured grey to bright orange-brown, which peels as the tree grows. Its fruit is appreciated in Chile and Argentina and its flowers are important for honey production. The Chilean myrtle has medicinal uses for the [local native] Mapuche people.” — Wikipedia

After falling through the rabbit hole, "Alice" was dwarfed by the local ferns in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

After falling through the rabbit hole, “Alice” was dwarfed by the local ferns in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

 

 

The waterfall was one of the visual highlights on our nature hike in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

The waterfall (Barba del Viejo cascade) was one of the visual highlights on our nature hike in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Ferns and a leaf vine growing parasitically on a tree trunk in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Ferns and a leaf vine growing parasitically on a tree trunk in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

The forested nature trail ended in a flowering meadow just before reaching Riesco Lake in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

The forested nature trail ended in a flowering meadow just before reaching Riesco Lake in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

A flowering meadow overlooking Riesco Lake in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

A flowering meadow overlooking Riesco Lake in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

 

Riesco Lake, well known for its quiet and transparent blue waters, in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Lago Riesco (Riesco Lake), well known for its quiet and transparent blue waters, in Parque Aiken del Sur, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Returning to the ship before it departed Puerto Chacabuco proved to be the most harrowing experience we had in all of 2015 (and we had some good adventures!). Our guide had arranged for our driver to meet us at Lago Riesco (Riesco Lake) at 4:15 p.m. in order to drive back to the port for us to catch a tender before that service stopped at 5:15 (the all-aboard time was 5:30 p.m.).  The appointed time came and went and after a few minutes, our guide found that there was no cell phone signal at the lake. I successfully broke into the lodge/dinging hall on the hill overlooking Lago Riesco and, excitedly, found a short wave (CB) radio. Much to our chagrin, the battery it was connected to was dead and the electricity to the building had been turned off and we couldn’t find the main switch. Getting more nervous about being stranded in Puerto Chacabuco with only the clothes on our back, no passports, hardly any money, and knowing the ship would be traversing the Patagonian fjords for four days before arriving at the next port (Ushuaia, Argentina), we decided to start the hour-plus long hike back to the park headquarters and visitor center. 

As we descended the hill toward the trail, it was with a huge sigh of relief that we saw two local policemen – whom our guide knew. They informed her that the gate on the road up to the lodge/dining hall/Riesco Lake had been locked closed and our car and driver were sitting (on the other side) there for over an hour. We jumped in the car and had a really fast drive through the park on dirt roads (nearly breaking an axle) and then sped down the highway back to the port. A ship’s tender had waited shore-side in case we showed up at the last minute – what a welcome sight! We boarded the ship at 5:29, greatly relieved that we had narrowly avoided the unwelcome adventure of spending four unscheduled days ashore with no cell phone, passport, money, or spare clothing – and no plans/reservations to get from Chile to Argentina. Later we did find out that the ship would have ferried our passports ashore and left them with the port agent so that we’d at least have our IDs and the ability to travel to meet up with the ship at the next port.

Needless to say, we were thrilled with the views as we sailed through the fjords of Patagonia that evening, knowing we almost got to spend an unplanned extra four days ashore…

Sailing through the fjords of Patagonia -- here, the Fiordo Aisen -- after departing Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Sailing through the fjords of Patagonia — here, the Fiordo Aisen — after departing Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

 

 

Puerto Chacabuco and Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

Anchorage in Fiordo Aisén (Aysén Fjord), Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Anchorage in Fiordo Aisén (Aysén Fjord), Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

“Where the Andes tumble into the sea” is an apt description for Puerto Chacabuco and Puerto Aysén, remote outposts at the head of Chile’s Fiordo Aisén (Aysén Fjord). Back-dropped by snow-capped peaks, these small towns are the gateways to several nearby national parks.

A new housing developmnet overlooking the harbor, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

A new housing development overlooking the harbor, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

 

A new home in the developmnet overlooking the harbor, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

A new home in the development overlooking the harbor, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Puerto Chacabuco’s population is only 1,400 and the main economic activity is its harbor – built after the old port, further upriver in Puerto Aysén, was lost due to a natural disaster. For shopping, locals and visitors alike head to Puerto Aysén, 9 miles (14 km) away, or the regional capital Coyhaique, 48 miles (77 km) to the east.

Three interconnected tent domes housing artisans from nearby Puerto Aysén, adjacent to the harbor, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

Three interconnected tent domes housing artisans from nearby Puerto Aysén, adjacent to the harbor, Puerto Chacabuco, Patagonia, Chile

The scenic bridge over Rio Aisén (Aysén  River) on the road from Puerto Chacabuco, Puerto Aysén , Patagonia, Chile

The scenic bridge over Rio Aisén (Aysén River) on the road from Puerto Chacabuco, Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

Puerto Aysén is a popular embarkation point for venturing into Chile’s numerous national parks in Patagonia. Reflective of the environment, fishing and salmon farming are the area’s main economic drivers. Chile’s largest suspension bridge – President Ibanez Bridge – crosses Rio Aisén (Aysén River). It spans 689 feet (210 meters) and was named a national monument over a decade ago.

Iglesia Catedral (the main church), Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

Iglesia Catedral (the main church), Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

 

Monument to the early settlers in the center of town, Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

Monument to the early settlers in the center of town, Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

New housing with painting honoring Native (South) Americans, Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

New housing with painting honoring Native (South) Americans, Puerto Aysén, Patagonia, Chile

 

Eat local: Cooking with ingredients from Patagonia on the ship, at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

Using ingredients purchased in Patagonia, our lunch in our apartment on the ship was fresh local Chiloé Island mussels in a tomato Meunière sauce with a fresh salad, anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

Using ingredients purchased in Patagonia, our lunch in our apartment on the ship was fresh local Chiloé Island mussels in a tomato Meunière sauce with a fresh salad, anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

 

After finding some excellent local markets and loading up on fresh ingredients, it was time to cook and enjoy a few meals in our apartment on the ship.  Being able to cook some of the excellent local ingredients from markets around the world is one of the great pleasures of having a kitchen in the apartment as we circumnavigate the world every two years.

 

With a hankering for some pasta, although not local, our dinner in our apartment began with linguine with Italian porcini mushroom and truffles sauce, anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

With a hankering for some pasta, although not local, our dinner in our apartment began with linguine with Italian porcini mushroom and truffles sauce, anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

Totally local, our dinner in our apartment continued with sauteed fresh local Chilean fish fillets with a shrimp and Chiloé Island mussel suace with local Romano beans and basil, anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

Our dinner in our apartment continued with totally local ingredients — sauteed fresh Chilean fish fillets with a shrimp and Chiloé Island mussel sauce with local Romano beans and basil, anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

Our dinner in our apartment happily ended with shared desserts from the leading bakery in Puerto Chacabuco -- here the walnut tort; anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

Our dinner in our apartment happily ended with shared desserts from the leading bakery in Puerto Chacabuco — here the walnut tort; anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

 

We’re still arguing over which of these awesome desserts was the best.  Luckily, they both looked so good at the bakery we bought one of each so we could have the argument!

 

Our dinner in our apartment happily ended with shared desserts from the leading bakery in Puerto Chacabuco -- here the dulce de leche cake; anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile

Our dinner in our apartment happily ended with shared desserts from the leading bakery in Puerto Chacabuco — here the dulce de leche cake; anchored at Puerto Chacabuco, Chile