The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #1

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #1

 

A pleasing blend of Moroccan and Andalusian influences, the Blue City of Chefchaouen is nestled in the Rif Mountains about two hours south of Tangier.  Named for the brilliant hue adorning most of its buildings (originally chosen by Sephardic Jews fleeing the Spanish Inquisition), the Blue City is undeniably one of the country’s prettiest.  After a long van ride, we had a guided visit to the medina, a hike up to the Ras el-Maa waterfall, a traditional Moroccan lunch at Casa Hassan and time to explore the city on our own and do some shopping in the Kasbah and the souk – much calmer and less crowded than those in larger cities.

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #2

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #2

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #3

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #3

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #4

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #4

 

“The word magical is fairly overused today, but if there’s a place that truly epitomizes the mystical adjective it’s Chefchaouen, in the northwest of Morocco.  It’s a destination known by many — especially Instagram and Pinterest addicts — as simply the ‘Blue City,’ and it’s perched amid the Rif Mountains, creating a dramatic landscape on approach and an ethereal atmosphere when you’re in it.

“The Berber city was founded in 1471 with the construction of its walled casbah and fortress (defense against the Portuguese).  Many Jews settled in medieval times, and the Spanish conquered it in the early 20th century, giving it a Spanish inflection that remains, although it’s back under the purview of Morocco now.  It’s small, but Chefchaouen is by no means undiscovered.  And with the proliferation of social media, its visibility is only going to rise…

“It’s called the Blue City, but Chefchaouen could more accurately be called the 50 Shades of Blue City, as it’s full of so many variations on a theme.  Powder blue, cyan, robin’s-egg, indigo, cobalt, azure, periwinkle — it’s painted in an endless array of shades that make it feel truly alive.  The reason for the photogenic and people-pleasing palette is up for debate:  Some believe it was the Jews who painted it in their religion’s divine color (which represents the color of the sea and sky) after escaping Europe, while others chalk it up to blue acting as a mosquito repellent.  Regardless of the reasons, the hues are subject to change as the sun moves across the sky.” – November 19, 2017, by Kathryn Romeyn, Vogue on http://www.vogue.com

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #5

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #5

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #6

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #6

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #7

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #7

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #8

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #8

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #9

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #9

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #10

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #10

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #11

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #11

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #12 – El Mellah El-Jadid, the Jewish neighborhood that dates back to the 16th century when the Jews were welcomed to reside within the walls of t

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #12 – El Mellah El-Jadid, the Jewish neighborhood that dates back to the 16th century when the Jews were welcomed to reside within the walls of the Medina

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #1

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #1

 

“Architecture in Morocco is a blend of Black African and Islamic design styles, with the Islamic styles dominating in this combination.  This is not only viewed in the building itself, but the lavish gardens, extravagant decorations and elaborate use of deep and contrasting color.  Turbulence in the history of Morocco is clearly seen in the strong desert fortifications and the well-protected palace walls.  It is also the style with which Moroccans choose to decorate the interiors of buildings that gives these architectural wonders a unique and majestic atmosphere.

“There are a few dominant characteristics in regard to the architecture of Morocco.  Most buildings feature large, intimidating archways and beautiful domes that complete them.  It is also common to find enchanting courtyards, sprawling gardens and the use of ornaments to decorate the exterior of the building.  Moroccan architecture also makes use of Islamic calligraphy as decoration as opposed to pictures.  And, as mentioned before, the use of color also plays a significant role in their designs.  Geometric patterns are also commonly found in the architecture of Morocco.” — http://www.morocco.com

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #2

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #2

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #3

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #3

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #4

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #4

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #5

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #5

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #6

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #6

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #7

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #7

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #8

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #8

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #9

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #9

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #10

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #10

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #11

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #11

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #12

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #12

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #13

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #13

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #14

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #14

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Tangier, Morocco

A panoramic view of Tangier, Morocco, from the Place de l_Arsenal in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina) showing (along the horizon) from the left, the Atlantic Ocean, the Atlantic Coast of

A panoramic view of Tangier, Morocco, from the Place de l’Arsenal in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina) showing (along the horizon) from the left, the Atlantic Ocean, the Atlantic Coast of southwest Spain, the Strait of Gibraltar, and, left-center, the city of Gibraltar; across the waters (center) of the Mediterranean Sea is the north coast of Morocco; the port of Tangier is in the foreground (including our ship, at dock)

 

Tangier, a Moroccan port on the Strait of Gibraltar, has been a strategic gateway between Africa and Europe since Phoenician times.  “Guarding the Strait of Gibraltar, Tangier has for centuries been Europe’s gateway to Africa.  Its blend of cultures and influences is unique in Morocco – for much of its history it wasn’t even governed by Morocco.  Tangier has always carried a slightly seedy allure, in part due to its time as a semi-independent international zone that attracted eccentric foreigners, artists and spies.  Officially sanctioned neglect later gave it a dismal reputation, and visitors were often quick to flee its sleaze and hustle.  Contemporary Tangier could hardly be more different.  Investment has flowed in and the white city gleams with an air of confidence.  The corniche bustles, entrepreneurs in the new business district have replaced the hustlers, and a new marina is under construction, along with the new TGV train line to Casablanca. Tangier’s cultural life is buzzing in a way it hasn’t done since the 1950s.” — www.lonelyplanet.com

 

The fountain in the Grand Socco, Place du 9 Avril 1947, Tangier, Morocco

The fountain in the Grand Socco, Place du 9 Avril 1947, Tangier, Morocco

 

The old city wall of Tangier, Morocco, dating back to the Romans

The old city wall of Tangier, Morocco, dating back to the Romans

 

“They all rushed to Tangier.  From the 1920s to the 1950s, when the Moroccan port city was a freewheeling ‘international zone’ governed (barely) by a consortium of mostly European powers, Tangier attracted expatriates and travelers seeking illicit substances and activities in a palm-fringed seaside crossroads where Africa almost touches Europe.  Barbara Hutton, the Woolworth heiress, and the billionaire Malcolm Forbes built palaces and hosted celebrities.  Beat writers, from William S. Burroughs to Paul and Jane Bowles, wrote in a haze of drugs and booze. And the future enfants terribles of Moroccan literature, Mohamed Choukri andMohammed Mrabet, stalked the cafes.  Reviled, the Moroccan monarchy let the city decay.  By the 1970s Tangier was a seedy has-been.

“Today the city is undergoing a turnaround.  Prized by King Mohammed VI, who assumed the throne in 1999, Tangier is building a huge new port, a green seafront and Africa’s first high-speed train line.  Monuments and museums are getting face-lifts, and the streets of both the centuries-old Moorish medina and the colonial-era neighborhoods are sprouting boutique hotels, design shops and Euro-Moroccan restaurants.  There’s even an electro festival, Nuits Sonores Tanger, created in 2013 and held in October.  Couple those with classic draws — long beaches, artisanal goods, a thriving cafe culture — and Tangier is ripe for a global return.” – “36 Hours in Tangier” By Seth Sherwood, The New York Times, April 15, 2016

 

A weather-beaten wall, Tangier, Morocco

A weather-beaten wall, Tangier, Morocco

 

The old fort in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina) above the modern port of Tangier, Morocco

The old fort in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina) above the modern port of Tangier, Morocco

 

A door to the home where the writer William Burroughs lived in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina) in a back alley, Tangier, Morocco

A door to the home where the Beat writer William S. Burroughs lived in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina) in a back alley, Tangier, Morocco

 

The minaret of the Mohammed V Mosque rises above the old and new in Tangier, Morocco

The minaret of the Mohammed V Mosque rises above the old and new in Tangier, Morocco

 

The minaret of a mosque in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

The minaret of a mosque in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

 

The elaborate entrance of the mosque in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

The elaborate entrance of the mosque in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

 

A colorful street in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

A colorful street in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

 

A local man with his fresh bread purchases walking home in in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

A local man with his fresh bread purchases walking home in in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

An elaborate wall with a Moorish design in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

An elaborate wall with a Moorish design in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

 

Brightly painted stairs and walls in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

Brightly painted stairs and walls in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

 

Homes in the old Spanish colonial buildings (in need of repair) near the Grand Socco entrance to the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

Homes in the old Spanish colonial buildings (in need of repair) near the Grand Socco entrance to the Ancien Medina (Old Medina), Tangier, Morocco

 

Our ship in the modern port of Tangier, Morocco, from the Place de l_Arsenal in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina)

Our ship in the modern port of Tangier, Morocco, from the Place de l’Arsenal in the Ancien Medina (Old Medina)

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

The entrance to Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden) and the artist Jacques Majorelle_s studio (now a Berber Museum), designed in 1931 by architect Paul Sinoir and saved from real estat

The entrance to Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden) and the artist Jacques Majorelle’s studio (now a Berber Museum), designed in 1931 by architect Paul Sinoir and saved from real estate developers in 1980 by Pierre Bergé and Yves Saint Laurent (the fashion designer); Marrakech, Morocco

 

“[Jardin Majorelle], the Majorelle Garden, in Marrakech is one of the most visited places in Morocco.  It took the French painter Jacques Majorelle (1886-1962) forty years to create, with passion, this enchanting place, today in the heart of the red city.  In its shaded alleys, one strolls among the trees and exotic plants whose origin makes one dream, with running waterways filled with refreshing murmurs and ponds filled with water lilies and lotus; you can hear in the fragrant air here and there the rustle of the leaves and the chirping of the many birds that come to take refuge there.  Stop at a bend in front of a building with Moorish charm or Art Deco style, surprisingly painted with very bright primary colors dominated by the intense blue seen in the Atlas by the artist [“Majorelle Blue”].  One is soothed and bewitched by the harmony of this luxuriant and alive picture where the senses are delicately solicited to offer a magic walk, out of the city so animated yet so close, in the enclosure protected by the high walls of ground, out of time.” — http://www.jardinmajorelle.com

 

Jacques Majorelle became a gardener in his travels and his collected rare trees and plants that were arranged in his garden in what would be described as a pictorial composition of a pai

Jacques Majorelle became a gardener in his travels and his collected rare trees and plants were arranged in his garden in what would be described as a pictorial composition of a painter; Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

A wall of the artist Jacques Majorelle_s studio (now a Berber Museum) painted in "Majorelle blue", designed in 1931 by architect Paul Sinoir; Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marra

A wall of the artist Jacques Majorelle’s studio (now a Berber Museum) painted in “Majorelle blue”, designed in 1931 by architect Paul Sinoir; Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

“Majorelle blue” – a strong, intense cobalt blue color — was introduced by Jacques Majorelle in 1937 in his garden and on the walls of his studio.  In the garden, the color was painted onto the gates, the pergolas, the ceramic jars and various buildings – an unusually bold and generously colored primary blue.

 

Fountains in the Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden) were designed to introduce soothing sounds that contrast with the noise of the busy city outside the walls of the garden; Marrakech,

Fountains in the Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden) were designed to introduce soothing sounds that contrast with the noise of the busy city outside the walls of the garden; Marrakech, Morocco

 

Stairs, geometric patterns and the bold "Majorelle blue" outside the artist Jacques Majorelle_s studio (now a Berber Museum); Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

Stairs, geometric patterns and the bold “Majorelle blue” outside the artist Jacques Majorelle’s studio (now a Berber Museum); Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

Jacques Majorelle (1886-1962) was a French orientalist painter and son of the famous Art Nouveau furniture designer, Louis Majorelle.  He arrived in Morocco in 1917, invited by the French Resident-General, Marshal Lyautey.  Majorelle was seduced by Marrakesh.  In 1923, he decided to live there, purchasing a vast palm grove that would become the Jardin Majorelle as we know today.

In 1931, he commissioned the architect, Paul Sinoir, to build an artist’s studio in the Art Deco style; it’s walls were painted in “Majorelle Blue“.  Around it, he designed a garden, a living work of art composed of exotic plants and rare species collected during his worldwide travels.  He opened his garden to the public in 1947, but after his death in 1962, it fell into abandon.

In 1980, Pierre Bergé and Yves Saint Laurent acquired the Jardin Majorelle, saving it from real estate developers.  Since then, the garden has been restored, and many new plants have been added.  A museum dedicated to Berber culture was opened and the painter’s studio.  Today the Jardin Majorelle also includes a bookstore, café and boutique.

After the death of Yves Saint Laurent in 2008, Pierre Bergé donated the Jardin Majorelle to the foundation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent.  The Foundation Jardin Majorelle was established at this time.  A memorial to the French fashion designer was built in the garden.  —  courtesy Foundation Jardin Majorelle

 

The lily pond is a quiet oasis in the middle of Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

The lily pond is a quiet oasis in the middle of Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

Boldly painted large ceramic urns filled with plants line the walkways in Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

Boldly painted large ceramic urns filled with plants line the walkways in Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

The Moorish designs of the garden_s “kiosk” give way to the arch and a view of the long waterway leading to the square fountain (painted in "Majorelle blue) – pictured above; Jar

The Moorish designs of the garden’s “kiosk” give way to the arch and a view of the long waterway leading to the square fountain (painted in “Majorelle blue) – pictured above; Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

The long waterway leading to the square fountain (painted in "Majorelle blue); Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

The long waterway leading to the square fountain (painted in “Majorelle blue); Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

A painterly composition of cacti in Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

A painterly composition of cacti in Jardin Majorelle (Majorelle Garden), Marrakech, Morocco

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat Local: Luncheon We Prepared at Cooking School in Marrakech, Morocco

The intrepid explorer prepared to enjoy a tasty luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

The intrepid explorer prepared to enjoy a tasty luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

After our cooking class at a private Moroccan cooking workshop at a local riad, La Maison Arabe hotel and restaurant, we moved to a dining room, with a local musician playing, to enjoy the “fruits of our labors” for lunch [see our previous blog post].  The luncheon was one of the tastiest meals we had in Marrakech!  It included two tagines – vegetables and a chicken tagine with preserved lemon slices and green olives, traditional Moroccan flatbread, as well as a cold zucchini salad, warm eggplant salad and dessert.

 

The dining room for the cooking school had bookcases full of spices and books on Morocco and Marrakech; at the luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe. Marrakech, Morocco

The dining room for the cooking school had bookcases full of spices and books on Morocco and Marrakech; at the luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe. Marrakech, Morocco

 

Our luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe included two tagines – vegetables and a chicken tagine with preserved lemon slices and green olives, traditional Moroccan flatbre

Our luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe included two tagines – vegetables and a chicken tagine with preserved lemon slices and green olives, traditional Moroccan flatbread, as well as a cold zucchini salad, warm eggplant salad and dessert, Marrakech, Morocco

 

A local musician playing a traditional Moroccan stringed instrument at our luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

A local musician playing a traditional Moroccan stringed instrument at our luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Woven tagine covers on display in the dining room at our luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

Woven tagine covers on display in the dining room at our luncheon from our cooking class at La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

 

Cook Local: Cooking School in Marrakech, Morocco

The kitchen at the Cooking School with stations for the chef instructor, the intrepid explorer and your blogger, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

The kitchen at the Cooking School with stations for the chef instructor, the intrepid explorer and your blogger, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

One of the highlights of our stay in Marrakech was our (the intrepid explorer and your blogger) participation in a private Moroccan cooking workshop (for two) at a local riad.  The professionally operated school is part of La Maison Arabe hotel and restaurant.  Our terrific teacher was Ayada, whose grandmother was a private chef to the founder of Marrakech’s famous and popular Jardin Marjorelle [see an upcoming blog post].  Ayada learned about food and cooking from an early age from her grandmother, as Ayada was raised at the Jardin Marjorelle.  Her professional cooking career includes being a former chef at the well-regarded restaurant of La Maison Arabe.

 

Fresh tomatoes, peppers and eggplants for our dishes at the Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

Fresh tomatoes, peppers and eggplants for our dishes at the Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Our chef instructor, Ayada, deomonstrating the proper way to knead and shape the dough for traditional Moroccan flatbread, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

Our chef instructor, Ayada, demonstrating the proper way to knead and shape the dough for traditional Moroccan flatbread, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Our hands-on class focused on the cooking of two tagines, the baking of traditional Moroccan flatbread, as well as a variety of salads and dessert.  Afterwards, we had the opportunity to move to a dining room, with a local musician playing, to enjoy the “fruits of our labors” for lunch [see our next blog post].

 

Traditional Moroccan flatbread dough on a baking sheet sprinkled with semolina flour, ready for baking in the oven, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

Traditional Moroccan flatbread dough on a baking sheet sprinkled with semolina flour, ready for baking in the oven, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

For a break, we enjoyed properly prepared fresh Moroccan mint tea, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

For a break, we enjoyed properly prepared fresh Moroccan mint tea, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Ayada demonstrated the traditional Moroccan high pouring of mint tea, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

Ayada demonstrated the traditional Moroccan high pouring of mint tea, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Vegetables being cut up for a tagine, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

Vegetables being cut up for a tagine, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Traditional Moroccan flatbreads cooling after baking, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

Traditional Moroccan flatbreads cooling after baking, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Raw chicken in a tagine with the sauce before cooking on the stove top (the preserved lemons and green olives were added toward the end in order to not be overcooked), Cooking School, La

Raw chicken in a tagine with the sauce before cooking on the stove top (the preserved lemons and green olives were added toward the end in order to not be overcooked), Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

The six main spices used in our class- salt, paprika, cumin, black pepper, turmeric, and ginger; Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

The six main spices used in our class: salt, paprika, cumin, black pepper, turmeric, and ginger; Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

A cooked vegetable tagine with tomatoes, zucchini, potatoes, cauliflower, and green beans; Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

A cooked vegetable tagine with tomatoes, zucchini, potatoes, cauliflower, and green beans; Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

The chicken tagine cooking on the stove top, eggplant being cooked for a salad, and a cold zucchini salad – in progress at Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

The chicken tagine cooking on the stove top, eggplant being cooked for a salad, and a cold zucchini salad – in progress at Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

The finished chicken tagine with the preserved lemon slices and green olives, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

The finished chicken tagine with the preserved lemon slices and green olives, Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Plating our preparations for eating our lunch downstairs in the dining room- zucchini salad with a tomato rose, traditional Moroccan flatbread, preserved lemon chicken tagine, and the e

Plating our preparations for eating our lunch downstairs in the dining room: zucchini salad with a tomato rose, traditional Moroccan flatbread, preserved lemon chicken tagine, and the eggplant salad; Cooking School, La Maison Arabe, Marrakech, Morocco

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #1

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #1

 

“Moroccan architecture dates from 110 BCE [B.C.] with the massive pisé (mud brick) buildings.  The architecture has been influenced by Islamization during the Idrisid dynasty, Moorish exiles from Spain, and also by France who occupied Morocco in 1912.  Morocco is in Northern-Africa bordering the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.” – Wikipedia

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #2

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #2

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #3

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #3

 

“Design elements of Moroccan architecture also have a strong Islamic influence.  These include elaborate geometric patterns, ornamental Islamic calligraphy of Quranic verses, and colorful zellij (a ceramic-tile mosaic).  Open courtyards with lavish gardens can also be found at the center of most buildings: these were constructed as places of privacy and relaxation.” — www.journeybeyondtravel.com/morocco/architecture

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #4

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #4

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #5

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #5

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #6

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #6

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #7, on display at (and courtesy of) Khalid Fine Arts Gallery, Marrakech)

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #7, on display at (and courtesy of) Khalid Fine Arts Gallery, Marrakech)

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #8, on display at (and courtesy of) Khalid Fine Arts Gallery, Marrakech)

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #8, on display at (and courtesy of) Khalid Fine Arts Gallery, Marrakech)

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #9, on display at (and courtesy of) Khalid Fine Arts Gallery, Marrakech)

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #9, on display at (and courtesy of) Khalid Fine Arts Gallery, Marrakech)

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #10

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #10

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #11

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #11

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #12

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #12

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #13

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #13

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #14

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #14

 

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #15

Portals in Marrakech, Morocco, #15

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.