Hillsborough Castle and Gardens, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Hillsborough Castle, a Georgian mansion dating back to the 1750s, has been a grand family home and is now the official home of the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and a royal residence, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland

Hillsborough Castle, a Georgian mansion dating back to the 1750s, has been a grand family home and is now the official home of the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and a royal residence, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Hillsborough Castle, an elegant “Irish Big House”, was built by Willis Hill, the 1st Marquis of Downshire, in the 1750s.  The Georgian mansion has been a grand family home and is now the official home of the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, and a royal residence.  Her Majesty The Queen stays at Hillsborough, as do other members of the Royal Family when visiting Northern Ireland.  Viewed by some as a politically neutral venue, Hillsborough has played an important role in the Peace Process in Northern Ireland since the 1980s.  In 2014, Historic Royal Palaces (of the U.K.) took over the running of Hillsborough Castle and Gardens and began an ambitious project to restore the house and gardens to its former glory.  Following a five-year, 20 million British pound restoration, the palace and its exceptional gardens were officially reopened by the Prince of Wales (Prince Charles) and the Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla), in April of this year.

 

The State Entrance Hall has always been the entrance to the mansion and a space in which to welcome visitors from HM The Queen to pop star Gary Barlow

The State Entrance Hall has always been the entrance to the mansion and a space in which to welcome visitors from HM The Queen to pop star Gary Barlow; the portraits in the Hall portray all the main protagonists involved in the history of the house, including Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Paintings in an Irish ‘Big House’, as these aristocratic private homes were known, were usually created by minor jobbing artists.  These painters travelled around the country to paint for wealthy clients.  However, it is known that Hillsborough originally displayed work by one prominent artist, George Romney (1734-1802).  The house inventories going back as far as 1747 reveal that family portraits hung in the Dining Room, as was traditional.  Satirists were also popular, and these early inventories showed that the family owned many prints by William Hogarth.

 

The display of art at Hillsborough Castle was selected to represent both the history and the contemporary use of the house as a royal and government residence, drawing from several sources, including The Royal Collection

The display of art at Hillsborough Castle was selected to represent both the history and the contemporary use of the house as a royal and government residence, drawing from several sources, including The Royal Collection, The Schorr Collection and collections featuring contemporary Irish artists; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Over the years, numerous politicians and other dignitaries have spent time at Hillsborough Castle, from Eleanor Roosevelt, Japan’s Crown Prince, and the Dali Lama to Princess Diana, President George W. Bush, Prime Minister Tony Blain, and Hillary Clinton.

 

The Throne Room, a splendid space that is the ceremonial heart of the castle, was created in the early 19th century as a Saloon and was the picture gallery of the house

The Throne Room, a splendid space that is the ceremonial heart of the castle, was created in the early 19th century as a Saloon and was the picture gallery of the house; traditionally, that was where the Downshire family, like other aristocrats, would hang their most prized ‘history’ paintings, featuring stories from the Bible, mythology and ancient history, to reflect an aristocratic classical education; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

In the Red Room the paintings appear as a “cabinet hang”, typical of the type where many small, highly-decorative paintings are densely displayed – a cabinet was usually a private room in which intimate discussion took place

In the Red Room the paintings appear as a “cabinet hang”, typical of the type where many small, highly-decorative paintings are densely displayed – a cabinet was usually a private room in which intimate discussion took place; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

During the 1980s and 1990s, many of the delicate negotiations of the Peace Process were held in the Red Room of Hillsborough Castle.  It was in the Red Room that HM The Queen met Irish President Mary McAleese in 2005, for what was described at the time as “a historic event”.

 

Around the chair rail in the Red Room are a series of numbered miniature painted portraits of English Royalty

Around the chair rail in the Red Room are a series of numbered miniature painted portraits of English Royalty; this photograph captured #24, King Charles II; #23, Queen Catherine of England, wife of Charles II; #26, King James II; and #25, Ann Hyde (Duchess of York), wife of James II; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Around the Red Room at Hillsborough Castle are 40 miniature portraits of English sovereigns, and several of their consorts, which span the walls.  Prince Albert commissioned this collection, named the Bone Miniatures, in 1843.  Albert and Queen Victoria used to place the portraits on the floor to test each other’s knowledge of the family tree.  The collection is named after its creators, Henry Bone and his son Henry Pierce Bone.

 

One hallway in Hillsborough Castle was filled with satirical cartoons from the 19th century publications; pictured here is- St. Stephens Review Presentation Cartoon (Tom Merry) June 23rd, 1888. GEOGRAPHY BEWITCHED

One hallway in Hillsborough Castle was filled with satirical cartoons from the 19th century publications; pictured here is: St. Stephens Review Presentation Cartoon (Tom Merry) June 23rd, 1888. GEOGRAPHY BEWITCHED: The false Ireland & the True. Erin strangling the hag of Hawarden. Ireland strangles Home Rule advocate GLADSTONE, who is presented as the ‘hag’ of Hawarden Castle, his Flintshire home. The beautiful, youthful ERIN tries to stifle his manipulation of true Ireland

 

 

A second satirical cartoon caught our attention- Supplement given away with the WEEKLY FREEMAN 22nd May 1886 SUSPENSE!!! ERIN, the personification of IRELAND, stands outside the door of the House of Commons

A second satirical cartoon caught our attention: Supplement given away with the WEEKLY FREEMAN 22nd May 1886 SUSPENSE!!! ERIN, the personification of IRELAND, stands outside the door of the House of Commons as MPs debate the fate of the first Home Rule Bill

 

The formal and picturesque gardens at Hillsborough Castle cover 100 acres, including the newly restored Walled Garden that we walked to on the edge of the estate; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland

The formal and picturesque gardens at Hillsborough Castle cover 100 acres, including the newly restored Walled Garden that we walked to on the edge of the estate; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

A view of the Castle from the gardens, including a beautiful fountain in the formal garden; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

A view of the Castle from the gardens, including a beautiful fountain in the formal garden; Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

The entry and exit gate at Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

The entry and exit gate at Hillsborough Castle, Hillsborough, County Down, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Belfast City Hall is the civic building of Belfast City Council located in Donegall Square, Belfast, Northern Ireland United Kingdom -- facing North and effectively dividing the commercial and business areas of the city center

Belfast City Hall is the civic building of Belfast City Council located in Donegall Square, Belfast, Northern Ireland United Kingdom — facing North and effectively dividing the commercial and business areas of the city center

 

“The yellow gantry cranes of Harland & Wolff, the company behind Belfast’s shipbuilding industry and the creation of the Titanic, rise high above the River Lagan and can be seen from nearly everywhere in the city center, a reminder of the working class that built Belfast. As the capital of Northern Ireland — increasingly known for its new restaurants and stimulating galleries — turns its Troubles into tourism, it is fast coming into its own as a European hot spot.  Though HBO’s “Game of Thrones” — parts of which were filmed in local studios and nearby areas — deserves credit for helping to put Belfast on the map as a destination, much of the city’s appeal is its warm residents, who are unfailingly ready to share a joke.  So build some time into your visit to sink a pint or a cup of third-wave coffee and engage in some impromptu local conversation.” – The New York Times, “36 Hours in Belfast”, Sunday Travel section, August 4, 2019

 

On the east side of Belfast City Hall is a memorial to the passengers and crew of the Titanic (built and launched in 1912 in Belfast), Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

On the east side of Belfast City Hall is a memorial to the passengers and crew of the Titanic (built and launched in 1912 in Belfast), Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Downtown Belfast, near City Hall and Donegall Square, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Downtown Belfast, near City Hall and Donegall Square, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

There is much construction in Belfast, with downtown now having a mix of old and new architectural styles, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

There is much construction in Belfast, with downtown now having a mix of old and new architectural styles, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

The Crown Liquor Saloon (Bar), a famous 1820’s pub in Belfast, is an outstanding example of a Victorian gin palace, and one of Northern Ireland's best-known pubs

The Crown Liquor Saloon (Bar), a famous 1820’s pub in Belfast, is an outstanding example of a Victorian gin palace, and one of Northern Ireland’s best-known pubs

 

A wall painting advertising the fish and chips at Manny’s in downtown Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

A wall painting advertising the fish and chips at Manny’s in downtown Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

We had an excellent luncheon at Mourne Seafood Bar in the redeveloped and now hip Bank Square historic area of downtown Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

We had an excellent luncheon at Mourne Seafood Bar in the redeveloped and now hip Bank Square historic area of downtown Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

St Anne's Cathedral, also known as Belfast Cathedral, is a Protestant Cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Donegall Street, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

St Anne’s Cathedral, also known as Belfast Cathedral, is a Protestant Cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Donegall Street, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom; note the Celtic cross

 

Queen’s University Belfast’s main building was built in the Tudor-style; the university is known for its humanities, science and medicine programs, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Queen’s University Belfast’s main building was built in the Tudor-style; the university is known for its humanities, science and medicine programs, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Harland & Wolff, the major shipbuilder in Belfast (builder of the Titanic), has two massive yellow gantry cranes, Samson and Goliath, that dominate the Belfast skyline, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Harland & Wolff, the major shipbuilder in Belfast (builder of the Titanic), has two massive yellow gantry cranes, Samson and Goliath, that dominate the Belfast skyline, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

A view of Titanic City, home of the Titanic Belfast (the silver modern building) that offers “The Titanic Experience” to visitors, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

A view of Titanic City, home of the Titanic Belfast (the silver modern building) that offers “The Titanic Experience” to visitors, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

“Titanic City: These days the Titanic is so closely connected to Belfast’s identity that there is a whole neighbourhood named after the ill-fated liner: the shipyards where Titanic was constructed are now part of the Titanic Quarter. At its centre is the stunning, star-shaped edifice of Titanic Belfast, a state-of-the-art multimedia museum that has become the city’s number-one tourist draw. Around it are several other sites with links to the Titanic, and the former drawing offices of the Harland & Wolff shipping company are now part of the Titanic Hotel. No visitor to Belfast leaves without learning something about that ship.” — http://www.lonelyplanet.com/ireland/northern-ireland/belfast

 

The Titanic Belfast offers “The Titanic Experience” to visitors, an immersive museum-like journey through time from Boomtown Belfast at the end of the 19th century through the construction of the Titanic, its launch in 1912, its sinking

The Titanic Belfast offers “The Titanic Experience” to visitors, an immersive museum-like journey through time from Boomtown Belfast at the end of the 19th century through the construction of the Titanic, its launch in 1912, its sinking on its maiden voyage and the aftermath; Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

On the left, the tall tower is the Obel Tower, the tallest building in Belfast and Ireland, part of a modernized section of the city’s shoreline of the River Lagan, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

On the left, the tall tower is the Obel Tower, the tallest building in Belfast and Ireland, part of a modernized section of the city’s shoreline of the River Lagan, Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

The family-owned Tresco Island is the second-biggest island of the Isles of Scilly, England, United Kingdom, located in the Celtic Sea section of the Atlantic Ocean, southwest of Cornwall, England

The family-owned Tresco Island is the second-biggest island of the Isles of Scilly, England, United Kingdom, located in the Celtic Sea section of the Atlantic Ocean, southwest of Cornwall, England, measuring about 3.5 kilometers (2.2 mi) by 1.75 kilometers (1.1 mi)

 

On our second day in the Isles of Scilly we arranged for a private jet boat to take us and several friends from the ship to Tresco Island where we arranged with Mike Nelhams, Garden Curator of the well-known Tresco Abbey Garden, to meet us and conduct a private tour of the Garden.  On the drive from the pier to the Garden, we had a brief, but colorful tour of the small island and were given some background on the creation of the Garden.  We also learned that the island is administered for the British Crown by the Duchy of Cornwall and is leased to the Dorrien-Smith estate, which runs it as a timeshare business.  The Dorrien-Smith family (descended from the island’s founder, Augustus Smith) held the position of Lord Proprietors of the Scilly Islands between 1834 and 1920.

 

The Tresco Island church, established by and with construction costs paid for by the island’s Lord Proprietor, Augustus Smith, in the mid-1800s, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

The Tresco Island church, established by and with construction costs paid for by the island’s Lord Proprietor, Augustus Smith, in the mid-1800s, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #1 -- entrance

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #1 — entrance

 

“The creation of the Tresco Abbey Garden began in 1934, extending over the grounds around the remains of the 12th century St. Nicholas Priory.  Helped by the efforts of Scillonian master mariners, Augustus Smith [the wealthy mastermind and proprietor behind the development and settlement of family-owned Tresco Island] brought together an extraordinary collection and began to lay it out according to the plants’ widespread native lands.

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #2

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #2

 

“Today [visitors] can wander through some garden zones with themes such as ‘Higher and Lower Australia’, ‘Mexico’ and ‘South Africa Cliff.’  Mediterranean and South American species are extensively represented as well as those from California, New Zealand and the Canary Islands.  Altogether there are over 4,000 specimens [and over 20,000 plants], including Cacti, and abundance of Palms, Bamboo, New Zealand ‘Flame-Trees’, Echium, Agapanthus, Aeonium and King Proteas.

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #3 -- remains of the 12th century St. Nicholas Priory

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #3 — remains of the 12th century St. Nicholas Priory

 

“Enjoying exceptional hours of sunshine and the encouragement of the Gulf Stream, the Gardens bask in ideal conditions and have been acknowledged by leading experts as one of the world’s finest botanical experiments.

“Throughout the gardens there are enchanting and intriguing artifacts and sculptures including the evocative Valhalla Museum – figureheads from ancient shipwrecks that remind us of the dramatic seafaring past.” – Tresco Abbey Garden brochure

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #4 -- remains of the 12th century St. Nicholas Priory

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #4 — remains of the 12th century St. Nicholas Priory

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #5

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #5

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #6

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #6

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #7

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #7

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #8 – the shell house with murals constructed from sea shells

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #8 – the shell house with murals constructed from sea shells

 

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #9 – a ship’s figurehead recovered from a nearby wreck, as presented in the Valhalla Museum at the Garden

Tresco Abbey Garden, Tresco Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom #9 – a ship’s figurehead recovered from a nearby wreck, as presented in the Valhalla Museum at the Garden (the collection was begun in 1840 by Augustus Smith, Lord Proprietor of Tresco Island, and continued by his family after his death in 1872)

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Drink local: Holy Vale Winery, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

Holy Vale Winery's vineyard was planted in the spring of 2009 by local resident and hotelier Robert Francis who wanted to pioneer the production of good quality wines on the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

Holy Vale Winery’s vineyard was planted in the spring of 2009 by local resident and hotelier Robert Francis who wanted to pioneer the production of good quality wines on the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

 

In the afternoon on St. Mary’s Island we joined a small group for a visit, tour and tasting at the Islands’ only winery, Holy Vale Winery.  The winery and local vineyards are a project of local hotelier (and chairman of the Council of the Isles of Scilly) Robert Francis, who knows wines from around the world and wanted to pioneer the production of good quality wines on the Isles of Scilly.  Because production of local wines is so difficult and there is very limited availability, the winery’s second goal is to select some fine wines from around the world and introduce them to winery visitors (in lieu of tasting only local wines).  The winery’s website notes: “Holy Vale Wines is a British family owned and run company, created to bring you a very special collection of some of the most exciting, delicious wines from around the world, featuring California [from the Francis Ford Coppola Family Winery, and others]. Our selection is driven by our passion for great wine that is ready to drink, offering exceptional value and quality.

“Holy Vale Vineyard was planted in the spring of 2009 after a couple of years trying to beg, borrow or steal redundant farm land on St Mary’s.  With co-operation from the Duchy of Cornwall and local farmers we were able to set about obtaining the land we had found that suited the planting of the vines, mostly sloping and facing south, to aid water drainage and aspect to the sun.  These parcels of land are situated in Holy Vale, Maypole, Silver Carn and Helvear.  It was not possible to obtain all the land together in one parcel, but that in some respects is an advantage because it will give diversity and different character to the wines.

 

The winery has several parcels of vineyards across St. Mary’s Island on the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom; these are located at the winery where we visited and had a tour and tasting

The winery has several parcels of vineyards across St. Mary’s Island on the Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom; these are located at the winery where we visited and had a tour and tasting

 

“We carefully selected nurseries in Burgundy and Luxemburg to nurture the vines of our grape varieties grafted on to our rootstock. 7,000 vines were ordered of our selection, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris.  These were chosen instead of the normal, mostly German varieties that have traditionally been grown in the UK mainly for climatic reasons. Our choice reflected the commitment and quality that we wish to achieve, rather than quantity. Our resolve is to produce the most special wines, even though working with Pinot Noir is especially difficult.

“We are now producing, bottling and selling Holy Vale Wines, 2014 was our very first vintage. We offer tours of the vineyard and tastings of wines at the vineyard…”– http://www.holyvalewines.co.uk

 

The first vintage of Holy Vale Pinot Noir was 5 years after the vines were planted, in 2014; there was no wine made in the subsequent four years due to weather and loss of grapes to predators, so there are no tastings of recent vintages

The first vintage of Holy Vale Pinot Noir was 5 years after the vines were planted, in 2014; there was no wine made in the subsequent four years due to weather and loss of grapes to predators, so there are no tastings of recent vintages

 

Some of the wine making equipment at the Holy Vale Vineyard winery, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

Some of the wine making equipment at the Holy Vale Vineyard winery, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

 

The wines from around the world that we tasted with winemaker Robert Francis at Holy Vale Vineyard winery, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

The wines from around the world that we tasted with winemaker Robert Francis at Holy Vale Vineyard winery, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom. Note that Robert was very gracious and generous and pulled a couple of bottles of his 2014 Holy Vale Pinot Noir from the winery’s “library” to taste with us; at 11.5% ABV (alcohol) – due to the cool weather on the island — the Holy Vale Pinot Noir was lighter that we are used to on the West Coast of the United State, but refreshing with good acidity and fruit.

 

Winemaker Robert Francis at Holy Vale Vineyard winery in the vineyard with a bottle of his 2014 Holy Vale Pinot Noir, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

Winemaker Robert Francis at Holy Vale Vineyard winery in the vineyard with a bottle of his 2014 Holy Vale Pinot Noir, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, United Kingdom

The island of St Mary’s is the principal island in the group of islands off the coast of Cornwall, England, collectively known as the Isles of Scilly – these boats were moored just outside the small working harbor of Hugh Town, St. Mary's main port

The island of St Mary’s is the principal island in the group of islands off the coast of Cornwall, England, collectively known as the Isles of Scilly – these boats were moored just outside the small working harbor of Hugh Town, St. Mary’s main port

 

Together, the populated islands of St. Mary’s, Tresco, St. Martin’s, Bryher, and St. Agnes, along with over 1,000 other very small uninhabited islands – some being virtually rocks rising from the ocean — form the unspoiled and peaceful Isles of Scilly that lie off the coast of Cornwall.  Located just 38 miles off Land’s End (the southwestern tip of England), the Isles, part of the United Kingdom, are a beguiling and remote archipelago a world away from the rest of England.  On the first day of our visit we docked off St. Mary’s Island (year-round population of approximately 1,800 people) and took a tender into Hugh Town, the island’s main port and principal city.  After walking through the small shops, restaurants, galleries and homes in Hugh Town, we took a morning hike around the 2.5 square mile (6.5 square kilometer) island.

 

As we began a morning hike around the 2.5 square mile (6.5 square kilometer) island, we walked through the small shops, restaurants, galleries and homes in Hugh Town, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

As we began a morning hike around the 2.5 square mile (6.5 square kilometer) island, we walked through the small shops, restaurants, galleries and homes in Hugh Town, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

 

Walking around St. Mary’s Island we came across many outcroppings, Isles of Scilly, England

Walking around St. Mary’s Island we came across many outcroppings, Isles of Scilly, England

 

One of the highest points on St. Mary’s Island was this rock outcropping, Isles of Scilly, England

One of the highest points on St. Mary’s Island was this rock outcropping, Isles of Scilly, England

 

Due to the high winds on St. Mary’s Island, farming plots are fenced in by stone walls, Isles of Scilly, England

Due to the high winds on St. Mary’s Island, farming plots are fenced in by stone walls, Isles of Scilly, England

 

A lighthouse on the coast of St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

A lighthouse on the coast of St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

 

This area, beyond the lighthouse, had the largest rock outcroppings on St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

This area, beyond the lighthouse, had the largest rock outcroppings on St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

 

Farms just outside of Hugh Town, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

Farms just outside of Hugh Town, St. Mary’s Island, Isles of Scilly, England

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.