Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

The gigantic concrete Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church in Casablanca, Morocco, was built between 1953 and 1956

The gigantic concrete Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church in Casablanca, Morocco, was built between 1953 and 1956

 

The gigantic concrete Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church in Casablanca, Morocco, was built between 1953 and 1956.  It is one of the only two Catholic Churches that in Casablanca (the other one is the Sacred Heart Church).  The cathedral’s imposing white concrete façade looks more like a warehouse than a church and a simple white cross is the only hint to its purpose.  The main attraction for visitors is the spectacular stained glass windows, the work of Gabriel Loire, a famous French artist.  They are cut on a red and blue colored background, reminiscent of typical Moroccan carpets, and represent different images of the Virgin Mary.

 

The open, airy interior is lit up by the colored beams of light that filter through stained glass windows which cover the two entire side walls, Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

The open, airy interior is lit up by the colored beams of light that filter through stained glass windows which cover the two entire side walls, Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

 

The absolutely breathtaking stained glass windows of the church are what capture everyone’s attention.  The open, airy interior is lit up by the colored beams of light that filter through these stained glass windows which cover the entirety of both side walls – giving a window surface area of over 800 square meters (8600 square feet).  The result is quite dazzling; unfortunately, it is very difficult to get good pictures of the stained glass walls and the overall interior design of the Notre Dame de Lourdes Church.

 

The stained glass windows are cut on a red and blue colored background, reminiscent of typical Moroccan carpets, and represent different images of the Virgin Mary, Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

The stained glass windows are cut on a red and blue colored background, reminiscent of typical Moroccan carpets, and represent different images of the Virgin Mary, Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

 

“At first glance, you may wonder why there is a Catholic church in Morocco.  The fact is that there are approximately 20,000 Catholics living in the country and that this religious denomination has long been accepted in Morocco.  The Notre Dame de Lourdes Church in Morocco is clear evidence of the strong Roman Catholic presence in Casablanca and, while this may not be the major religion in the country, it certainly isn’t only practiced by a small minority.” – www.Morocco.com

 

The spectacular stained glass windows are the work of Gabriel Loire, a famous French artist, Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

The spectacular stained glass windows are the work of Gabriel Loire, a famous French artist, Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

 

Like the contemporary La Mosquée Hassan II (Hassan II Mosque), the concrete and stained glass Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church – striking examples of modern design and construction — presents worshipers today a modern space for prayers that is lacking the history, the warmth of centuries-old architecture and design, and the physical wear and tear of much older houses of worship.

 

Colored beams of light coming from the stained glass windows streaming into the interior of Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

Colored beams of light coming from the stained glass windows streaming into the interior of Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

 

One thought on “Notre Dame de Lourdes Catholic Church, Casablanca, Morocco

  1. Stunning stained glass and mosaics in Casablanca – actually throughout Turkey. Any talk on the street there (that you can understand) about what is happening in the world?

    Liked by 1 person

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