Cartagena, Spain

A view of Cartagena, Spain, from our ship_s pier in the Port of Cartagena, with the Teatro Romano (Roman Theater) in the center

A view of Cartagena, Spain, from our ship’s pier in the Port of Cartagena, with the Teatro Romano (Roman Theater) in the center

 

Cartagena is a port city and naval base in the Murcia region of southeast Spain.  The city was founded by the Carthaginians around 220 B.C. on the site of an ancient Iberian settlement by the Carthaginian General Hasdrubal.  Its name, like that of its mother city, Carthage, was derived from the Phoenician Kart-hadasht (New Town).  In addition to its natural port, Cartagena was strategically important to Carthage and Rome because of its proximity to silver mines.  During Roman times the city boomed and today visitors can visit many Roman ruins in the city.

 

A view from the port, through palm trees, of the Plaza a de Héroes del Cavite, the corner of city hall and the entrance to Casco Antiguo (Old Quarter) in Cartagena, Spain

A view from the port, through palm trees, of the Plaza a de Héroes del Cavite, the corner of city hall and the entrance to Casco Antiguo (Old Quarter) in Cartagena, Spain

 

Near the Port of Cartagena is the Art Nouveau city hall building that contains a museum open to the public, Cartagena, Spain

Near the Port of Cartagena is the Art Nouveau city hall building that contains a museum open to the public, Cartagena, Spain  [Art Nouveau is an international style of art, architecture and applied art, especially the decorative arts, that was most popular between 1890 and 1910]

 

The front entrance of the Art Nouveau city hall on Calle Mayor, Cartagena, Spain

The front entrance of the Art Nouveau city hall on Calle Mayor, Cartagena, Spain

 

The city's characteristic Casco Antiguo (Old Quarter) features Art Nouveau townhouses built between the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Cartagena, Spain

The city’s characteristic Casco Antiguo (Old Quarter) features Art Nouveau townhouses built between the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Cartagena, Spain

 

Details of an Art Nouveau townhouse on Calle Mayor, the city_s main shopping street, Cartagena, Spain

Details of an Art Nouveau townhouse on Calle Mayor, the city’s main shopping street, Cartagena, Spain

 

Art Nouveau townhouses on Calle Mayor, Cartagena, Spain

Art Nouveau townhouses on Calle Mayor, Cartagena, Spain

 

A plaza in a residential section of Casco Antiguo (Old Quarter) with outdoor seating for a café, Cartagena, Spain

A plaza in a residential section of Casco Antiguo (Old Quarter) with outdoor seating for a café, Cartagena, Spain

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

The indoor dining room at José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain, with its indoor vertical living garden wall; the intrepid explorer is at our table with our friends

The indoor dining room at José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain, with its indoor vertical living garden wall; the intrepid explorer is at our table with our friends

 

While in Malaga, Spain, we and some friends from Canada decided to splurge on a Michelin one-star restaurant for a wonderful, long luncheon on our last day in the city.  It was a fantastic experience and, while it consisted of 19 courses plus sweet petit-fours, the portions were small enough so that we left not feeling too “stuffed.”  The chef, José Carlos Garcia, started with his parents in the family business and formally trained in Malaga’s cooking schools.  His cuisine focuses on ingredients from the sea and the mountains, sourced locally.  We enjoyed Spanish wines recommended by the sommelier to accompany the luncheon that were an excellent match with the food.  An experience worth having if you are in Malaga and quite memorable.

 

Presentation of the menus on our table at José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Presentation of the menus on our table at José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

We started our luncheon with a delicious, crisp white Spanish wine made from the Godello grapes in Gallicia in northwest Spain -- Louro from Rafael Palacios; José Carlos Garcia Restaur

We started our luncheon with a delicious, crisp white Spanish wine made from the Godello grapes in Gallicia in northwest Spain — Louro from Rafael Palacios; José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain; note that just a few decades ago the Godello grape had virtually disappeared from Spain, but was rescued (which we were very happy about!)

 

Course #1 “Hand Cocktail” whose contents were Campari and orange juice, a delicious start to our luncheon, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #1 “Hand Cocktail” whose contents were Campari and orange juice, a delicious start to our luncheon, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

“Restaurante José Carlos García is one of the Michelin star restaurants on the Costa del Sol and the only one in the city of Malaga.  Located at Muelle Uno, in the Puerto de Málaga (Malaga”s port), the chef offers a fusion of local produce with cutting edge cuisine.  The restaurant has just a few tables so that you can enjoy a unique, intimate and very personalized experience.  In addition, the kitchen is enclosed in glass so that you can enjoy watching the elaboration of each dish. Both the indoor room, with its outstanding vertical garden, and the terrace, have a sleek, modern decor.” — www.visitcostadelsol.com 

 

Course #2 “Oysters Bloody Mary”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #2 “Oysters Bloody Mary”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #3 “Sunflower seeds Polvoron” which was meringue-like and composed of egg whites and sesame seeds, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #3 “Sunflower seeds Polvoron” which was meringue-like and composed of egg whites and sesame seeds, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #4 “Homemade bread -- hummus” with pureed carrots, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain; the breads were amazing and were served through the rest of the meal

Course #4 “Homemade bread — hummus” with pureed carrots, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain; the breads were amazing and were served through the rest of the meal

 

Course #5 “Sea urchin – Guava” (really sea urchin in a guava “skin”), José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #5 “Sea urchin – Guava” (really sea urchin in a guava “skin”), José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #6 “Pasta choux – Game parfait” (which was a liver mousse inside gougeres) and Course #7 “Liquid Olive” (and our notes say “great flavor!”), José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #6 “Pasta choux – Game parfait” (which was a liver mousse inside gougeres) and Course #7 “Liquid Olive” (and our notes say “great flavor!”), José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #8 “Espeto Mackerel”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #8 “Espeto Mackerel”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #9 “Scallop – Dashi-Appel” where the Japanese-style dashi was made with tuna, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #9 “Scallop – Dashi-Appel” where the Japanese-style dashi was made with tuna, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #10 “Baby shrimp – liquid red pepper” served with yogurt, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #10 “Baby shrimp – liquid red pepper” served with yogurt, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #11 – a signature dish of the restaurant -- “Almond soup [photographed as it was being poured into the bowl]” served with mango balls and an almond gelatin wafer, José Car

Course #11 – a signature dish of the restaurant — “Almond soup [photographed as it was being poured into the bowl]” served with mango balls and an almond gelatin wafer, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #12 “Red prawn” served with white asparagus and Béarnaise sauce, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain – this dish tasted even better than the gorgeous photogr

Course #12 “Red prawn” served with white asparagus and Béarnaise sauce, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain [Béarnaise sauce is a sauce made of clarified butter emulsified in egg yolks and white wine vinegar and flavored with herbs] – this dish tasted even better than the gorgeous photograph!

Course #13 “Fish of the day -- Lime” was sea bass with a lime cream sauce and lime zest, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #13 “Fish of the day — Lime” was sea bass with a lime cream sauce and lime zest, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

For a red wine, the sommelier chose a delicious Tempranillo from the mid-north of Spain by Bodegas Hermanos Pérez Pascuas in the town of Pedrosa de Duero in Ribera del Duero, where the

For a red wine, the sommelier chose a delicious Tempranillo from the mid-north of Spain by Bodegas Hermanos Pérez Pascuas in the town of Pedrosa de Duero in Ribera del Duero, where the vineyards are over 25 years old and there is a winemaking tradition in the region that is over 100 years [Tempranillo is a black grape variety widely grown to make full-bodied red wines in its native Spain; its name is the diminutive of the Spanish temprano, a reference to the fact that it ripens several weeks earlier than most Spanish red grapes.]

 

Course #14 “Tortellini – Beef consomme” served with caviar, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #14 “Tortellini – Beef consomme” served with caviar, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #15 “Pichón – Pigion leg Canelonni”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain – thinks squab; it was really delicious and was very nicely complemented by the Bo

Course #15 “Pichón – Pigion leg Canelonni”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain – thinks squab; it was really delicious and was very nicely complemented by the Bodegas Hermanos Pérez Pascuas Tempranillo

 

Course #16 “Sweetbreads veal -- Sweet Corn”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #16 “Sweetbreads veal — Sweet Corn”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #17 began the desserts- “Pineapple – Piña Colada” was actually compressed pineapple with coconut atop and quite tasty – a nice play on the name of the cocktail, José

Course #17 began the desserts: “Pineapple – Piña Colada” was actually compressed pineapple with coconut atop and quite tasty – a nice play on the name of the cocktail, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #18 “Pumpkink – Raisin from Málaga” served with almond crumble and dried grapes and French vanilla ice cream, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #18 “Pumpkink – Raisin from Málaga” served with almond crumble and dried grapes and French vanilla ice cream, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Course #19 “White chocolate -- Strawberries”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

Course #19 “White chocolate — Strawberries”, José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Additionally, to end a fabulous meal, Petit Fours “plated” cleverly in a cooking pot filled with cocoa nibs (served with tea, coffee, cappuccino), José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, M

Additionally, to end a fabulous meal, Petit Fours “plated” cleverly in a cooking pot filled with cocoa nibs (served with tea, coffee, cappuccino), José Carlos Garcia Restaurante, Málaga, Spain

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

The outdoor seating area at the entrance of the modern tapas restaurant, uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

The outdoor seating area at the entrance of the modern tapas restaurant, uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

 

We liked the description that we had read: “modern tapas”.  Located near the Cathedral in the old town district of Málaga, Spain, uvedoble taberna is one of what Spanish food critics are calling a new generation of “Gastrobars” or “Gastrotapas”.  Unfortunately the outdoor seating was full when we arrived at the fashionable hour of 2:00 p.m. for a luncheon of tapas, so we were seated at a high table with stools in the front of the bar area and enjoyed the minimalist and modern décor with a view of the plaza outside the front windows.  Chef Willie has been turning out top notch contemporary interpretations of traditional Spanish tapas at the restaurant for nine years.  We thoroughly enjoyed our delicious luncheon prepared with very fresh, local ingredients and highly recommend the restaurant.

 

Tapa Foie Micuit (foie gras), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

Tapa Foie Micuit (foie gras), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

 

Tartar de Salmon (salmon tartar), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

Tartar de Salmon (salmon tartar), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

 

Ensalada Templada (warm salad with vieira (scallop) and gambas (shrimp), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

Ensalada Templada (warm salad with vieira (scallop) and gambas (shrimp), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

 

Tortilla Trufada (truffled potato Spanish tortilla), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

Tortilla Trufada (truffled potato Spanish tortilla), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

 

Fideos Negros (squid ink noodle fideuà with cuttlefish (like baby squid), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain [note- fideuà is essentially a Catalan version of paella made with pasta o

Fideos Negros (squid ink noodle fideuà with cuttlefish (like baby squid), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain [note: fideuà is essentially a Catalan version of paella made with pasta or noodles instead of rice]

Tapa Vieira (scallop tapa), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

Tapa Vieira (scallop tapa), uvedoble taberna, Málaga, Spain

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Shop local: Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

The Mercado Atarazanas building, designed by the architect Joaquin de Rucoba, was constructed in the 1870s; Málaga, Spain

The Mercado Atarazanas building, designed by the architect Joaquin de Rucoba, was constructed in the 1870s; Málaga, Spain

 

The Mercado Atarazanas (Central Market) of Málaga, Spain, is slightly north of the main shopping district and was within walking distance of the port where we docked.  The building, designed by the architect Joaquin de Rucoba, was constructed in the 1870s and is named after the naval workshop previously located on the site.  The building underwent major renovations from 2008 to 2010, including the restoration of the individual glass panels in the stained glass window that represents various monuments and historical moments in the city’s history.  We were able to purchase a wide array of local products including fresh fruits and vegetables, Spanish ham, olives, seafood and meat that we enjoyed cooking in our apartment’s kitchen on board over the next few days.

 

The stained glass window at the end of the building represents various monuments and historical moments in the city_s history, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

The stained glass window at the end of the building represents various monuments and historical moments in the city’s history, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

Springtime in Spain translated into a wide selection of fresh fruits and vegetables, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Springtime in Spain translated into a wide selection of fresh fruits and vegetables, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

Olives at the Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Olives at the Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

Fresh strawberries were very ripe and sweet, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Fresh strawberries were very ripe and sweet, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

A local specialty is freshly fried and salted Marcona almonds, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

A local specialty is freshly fried and salted Marcona almonds, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

Fresh local seafood, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

Fresh local seafood, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

“Fast food” for eating in the market – grilled local gambas (shrimp), Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

“Fast food” for eating in the market – grilled local gambas (shrimp), Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

The various kinds of Spanish ham (jamón) that we purchased here (e.g., Serano, Ibérico, etc.) were excellent and shared with several friends on board, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, S

The various kinds of Spanish ham (jamón) that we purchased here (e.g., Serano, Ibérico, etc.) were excellent and shared with several friends on board, Mercado Atarazanas, Málaga, Spain

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Málaga, Spain

A view of Málaga, Spain, from the Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle) with the Puerto de Málaga (Port of Malaga) and our ship docked there on the left, the tree-lined Paseo de

A view of Málaga, Spain, from the Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle) with the Puerto de Málaga (Port of Malaga) and our ship docked there on the left, the tree-lined Paseo del Parque in the center foreground, and Old Town and the La Merced districts center and right

 

Málaga is a port city on southern Spain’s Costa del Sol, known for its high-rise hotels and resorts jutting up from yellow-sand beaches.  Looming over that modern skyline are the city’s 2 massive hilltop citadels, the Alcazaba and ruined Gibralfaro, remnants of Moorish rule.  The city’s soaring Renaissance cathedral is nicknamed La Manquita (“one-armed lady”) because one of its towers was curiously left unbuilt.  We were thoroughly enchanted with the city, its inhabitants, shops, restaurants, Mercato Atarazanas (central food market) – see our upcoming blog post, and the fascinating mix of historical sites and buildings and modern architecture.  While we have been in the port city in the past, we just used it as a gateway to Grenada and its Moorish architectural gem, the Alhambra.  We’re glad that this visit we stayed on the coast and focused for a few days on the transformed port city.

 

The La Malagueta district with the Puerto de Málaga (Port of Malaga) lighthouse overlooking the harbor, Málaga, Spain

The La Malagueta district with the Puerto de Málaga (Port of Malaga) lighthouse overlooking the harbor, Málaga, Spain

 

The Moorish Alcazaba Fortress (dating back to 1057) in the foreground and Old Town behind it, with the Málaga Cathedral in the center, Málaga, Spain

The Moorish Alcazaba Fortress (dating back to 1057) in the foreground and Old Town behind it, with the Málaga Cathedral in the center, Málaga, Spain

 

Our driving tour of Málaga, Spain, had to be rerouted due to the protest march for a public pension system, today, tomorrow and always

Our driving tour of Málaga, Spain, had to be rerouted due to the protest march for a public pension system, today, tomorrow and always

 

The City Council Building is one of several impressive buildings located on the Paseo del Parque, a beautiful tree-lined main thoroughfare in Málaga, Spain

The City Council Building is one of several impressive buildings located on the Paseo del Parque, a beautiful tree-lined main thoroughfare in Málaga, Spain

 

“If you think the Costa del Sol is soulless, you clearly haven’t been to Málaga.  Loaded with history and brimming with a youthful vigour that proudly acknowledges its multi-layered past, the city that gave the world Picasso has transformed itself in spectacular fashion in the last decade, with half a dozen new art galleries, a radically rethought port area and a nascent art district called Soho.  Not that Málaga was ever lacking in energy: the Spanish-to-the-core bar scene could put bags under eyes of an insomniac madrileño, while the food culture encompasses both Michelin stars and tastefully tatty fish shacks.  Come here for tapas washed down with sweet local wine, and stay in a creative boutique hotel sandwiched between a Roman amphitheatre, a Moorish fortress and the polychromatic Pompidou Centre, while you reflect on how eloquently Málaga has reinvented itself for the 21st century. Look out, Seville.” — www.lonelyplanet.com/spain/andalucia/malaga

 

The impressive walls of Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle) on Gibralfaro Hill, one of the highest points in the city, Málaga, Spain; the structure initially served as a lightho

The impressive walls of Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle) on Gibralfaro Hill, one of the highest points in the city, Málaga, Spain; the structure initially served as a lighthouse and military barracks, with parts of the castle constructed in the 13th century, atop fortifications dating back to the Phoenician foundation of Málaga city around 770 BC

 

The northern residential neighborhoods of Málaga, Spain, as seen from Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle), partially pictured in the left foreground

The northern residential neighborhoods of Málaga, Spain, as seen from Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle), partially pictured in the left foreground

 

The oldest structures in Málaga, Spain, viewed from the top deck of our ship while docked in Puerto de Málaga (Port of Malaga)- on the left, the Moorish Alcazaba Fortress and on the

The oldest structures in Málaga, Spain, viewed from the top deck of our ship while docked in Puerto de Málaga (Port of Malaga): on the left, the Moorish Alcazaba Fortress and on the right, uphill, Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle)

 

The main shopping street of Málaga, Spain, Marqués de Larios, was lined with red carpet during the celebration of the annual Spanish International Film Festival in the city the week

The main shopping street of Málaga, Spain, Marqués de Larios, was lined with red carpet during the celebration of the annual Spanish International Film Festival in the city the week we visited

 

Spanish hams ready to be sliced to order at a tapas restaurant in Málaga, Spain

Spanish hams ready to be sliced to order at a tapas restaurant in Málaga, Spain

 

The Palacio Episcopal (Bishop_s Palace), adjacent to the Málaga Cathedral, was designed by the master builder of the Cathedral, Antonio Ramos, and features a statue of the Virgin de

The Palacio Episcopal (Bishop’s Palace), adjacent to the Málaga Cathedral, was designed by the master builder of the Cathedral, Antonio Ramos, and features a statue of the Virgin de las Angustias (Virgen of Sorrows), Málaga, Spain

 

The La Malagueta barrio (district) provides access to the popular La Malagueta beach and the promenade facing the port is lined with bars, restaurants and shops, Málaga, Spain

The La Malagueta barrio (district) provides access to the popular La Malagueta beach and the promenade facing the port is lined with bars, restaurants and shops, Málaga, Spain

 

The popular La Malagueta beach, Málaga, Spain--The popular La Malagueta beach, Málaga, Spain--The popular La Malagueta beach, Málaga, Spain

The popular La Malagueta beach, Málaga, Spain

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #1

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #1

 

A pleasing blend of Moroccan and Andalusian influences, the Blue City of Chefchaouen is nestled in the Rif Mountains about two hours south of Tangier.  Named for the brilliant hue adorning most of its buildings (originally chosen by Sephardic Jews fleeing the Spanish Inquisition), the Blue City is undeniably one of the country’s prettiest.  After a long van ride, we had a guided visit to the medina, a hike up to the Ras el-Maa waterfall, a traditional Moroccan lunch at Casa Hassan and time to explore the city on our own and do some shopping in the Kasbah and the souk – much calmer and less crowded than those in larger cities.

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #2

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #2

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #3

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #3

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #4

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #4

 

“The word magical is fairly overused today, but if there’s a place that truly epitomizes the mystical adjective it’s Chefchaouen, in the northwest of Morocco.  It’s a destination known by many — especially Instagram and Pinterest addicts — as simply the ‘Blue City,’ and it’s perched amid the Rif Mountains, creating a dramatic landscape on approach and an ethereal atmosphere when you’re in it.

“The Berber city was founded in 1471 with the construction of its walled casbah and fortress (defense against the Portuguese).  Many Jews settled in medieval times, and the Spanish conquered it in the early 20th century, giving it a Spanish inflection that remains, although it’s back under the purview of Morocco now.  It’s small, but Chefchaouen is by no means undiscovered.  And with the proliferation of social media, its visibility is only going to rise…

“It’s called the Blue City, but Chefchaouen could more accurately be called the 50 Shades of Blue City, as it’s full of so many variations on a theme.  Powder blue, cyan, robin’s-egg, indigo, cobalt, azure, periwinkle — it’s painted in an endless array of shades that make it feel truly alive.  The reason for the photogenic and people-pleasing palette is up for debate:  Some believe it was the Jews who painted it in their religion’s divine color (which represents the color of the sea and sky) after escaping Europe, while others chalk it up to blue acting as a mosquito repellent.  Regardless of the reasons, the hues are subject to change as the sun moves across the sky.” – November 19, 2017, by Kathryn Romeyn, Vogue on http://www.vogue.com

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #5

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #5

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #6

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #6

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #7

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #7

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #8

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #8

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #9

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #9

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #10

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #10

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #11

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #11

 

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #12 – El Mellah El-Jadid, the Jewish neighborhood that dates back to the 16th century when the Jews were welcomed to reside within the walls of t

The Blue City of Chefchaouen, Morocco, #12 – El Mellah El-Jadid, the Jewish neighborhood that dates back to the 16th century when the Jews were welcomed to reside within the walls of the Medina

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #1

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #1

 

“Architecture in Morocco is a blend of Black African and Islamic design styles, with the Islamic styles dominating in this combination.  This is not only viewed in the building itself, but the lavish gardens, extravagant decorations and elaborate use of deep and contrasting color.  Turbulence in the history of Morocco is clearly seen in the strong desert fortifications and the well-protected palace walls.  It is also the style with which Moroccans choose to decorate the interiors of buildings that gives these architectural wonders a unique and majestic atmosphere.

“There are a few dominant characteristics in regard to the architecture of Morocco.  Most buildings feature large, intimidating archways and beautiful domes that complete them.  It is also common to find enchanting courtyards, sprawling gardens and the use of ornaments to decorate the exterior of the building.  Moroccan architecture also makes use of Islamic calligraphy as decoration as opposed to pictures.  And, as mentioned before, the use of color also plays a significant role in their designs.  Geometric patterns are also commonly found in the architecture of Morocco.” — http://www.morocco.com

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #2

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #2

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #3

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #3

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #4

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #4

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #5

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #5

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #6

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #6

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #7

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #7

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #8

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #8

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #9

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #9

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #10

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #10

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #11

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #11

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #12

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #12

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #13

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #13

 

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #14

Portals in Tangier, Morocco, #14

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.