Búzios, Brazil

Búzios, Brazil, is a Brazilian resort set on an ocean peninsula east of Rio de Janeiro, known as an upscale vacation destination with numerous beaches

Búzios, Brazil, is a Brazilian resort set on an ocean peninsula east of Rio de Janeiro, known as an upscale vacation destination with numerous beaches

 

A sleepy fishing village propelled into the spotlight by a vacationing Brigitte Bardot, Búzios, Brazil [105 miles (169 kilometers) northeast of Rio de Janeiro] has retained its vintage holiday allure with a mix of upscale spa retreats, resorts and an endless list of outdoorsy pursuits.  The appeal of the peninsula’s beaches is two-fold; the tropical weather and scenic qualities heighten their glamorous reputation, and the strong waves and turquoise waters attract crowds of gilded youth on the lookout for surfing championships.  Visitors can explore the Igreja de Sant’Ana church perched above the Praia dos Ossos beach, discover the rugged coastline on a morning hike, or ride bikes along the boulevard to the town’s cobblestone streets and shop Rua das Pedras’ chic boutiques.

 

Overlooking the central “business district” of Búzios, Brazil -- filled with boutiques, bars, cafés, and restaurants (with more than a dozen pizzerias in the mix!)

Overlooking the central “business district” of Búzios, Brazil — filled with boutiques, bars, cafés, and restaurants (with more than a dozen pizzerias in the mix!)

 

A bronze statue of Brigitte Bardot who frequently vacationed in Búzios, Brazil, and helped popularize the peninsula and its beaches to vacationers

A bronze statue of Brigitte Bardot who frequently vacationed in Búzios, Brazil, and helped popularize the peninsula and its beaches to vacationers

 

Wooden sidewalks and cobblestone streets in the center of Búzios, Brazil, make for an inviting stroll among the boutiques and restaurants

Wooden sidewalks and cobblestone streets in the center of Búzios, Brazil, make for an inviting stroll among the boutiques and restaurants

 

A typical al fresco restaurant with local specialties, Búzios, Brazil

A typical al fresco restaurant with local specialties, Búzios, Brazil

 

Viewed through an alleyway between two shops, the large MSC cruise liner (3,000 passenger capacity) dwarfs the local fishing boats which here resemble the bathtub toys our grandchildren

Viewed through an alleyway between two shops, the large MSC cruise liner (3,000 passenger capacity) dwarfs the local fishing boats which here resemble the bathtub toys our grandchildren play with, Búzios, Brazil

 

A colorful mannequin invites visitors into a local boutique, Búzios, Brazil

A colorful mannequin invites visitors into a local boutique, Búzios, Brazil

 

A street vendor selling fresh green coconut water, Búzios, Brazil

A street vendor selling fresh green coconut water, Búzios, Brazil

 

Colorful wares for sale outside and inside a boutique in the heart of Búzios, Brazil

Colorful wares for sale outside and inside a boutique in the heart of Búzios, Brazil

 

The statue of three fishermen in the harbor is very lifelike, Búzios, Brazil

The statue of three fishermen in the harbor is very lifelike, Búzios, Brazil

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Copacabana (Beach), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

A view of Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from its southern terminus, looking north (Ipanema Beach is behind us, to the south, around the corner)

A view of Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from its southern terminus, looking north (Ipanema Beach is behind us, to the south, around the corner)

 

Copacabana (a waterfront neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) has one of the most famous beaches in the world.  This Atlantic Ocean-facing, 2.5 mile (4 km) beach is busy with round-the-clock activity (although tourists are advised to be very careful after dusk).  Visitors admire jungle-clad mountain scenery, viewing Copacabana Fort in the distance, and bicycling or walking along the beach-front promenade.  Both tourists and locals sip caipirinhas (the national drink of Brazil, traditionally made with limes) and dine on seafood or tapas at sidewalk cafés dotting the neighborhood’s streets.

 

Across the main street from the promenade, Copacabana is lined with high-rise hotels and condominiums

Across the main street from the promenade, Copacabana is lined with high-rise hotels and condominiums

 

The Copacabana Palace (Hotel) is the highest rated hotel in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; we had an excellent lunch in their casual restaurant, Pergola, by the swimming pool

The Copacabana Palace (Hotel) is the highest rated hotel in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; we had an excellent lunch in their casual restaurant, Pergola, by the swimming pool

 

The promenade is dotted with drink and food stands for refreshments, Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

The promenade is dotted with drink and food stands for refreshments, Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

sea water up the beach to be sprayed from hoses in order to cool of the sand for patrons who will enter (or exit) the beach barefoot, Copacabana Beach

The owners of the beach vending booths have installed generators to pump sea water up the beach to be sprayed from hoses in order to cool of the sand for patrons who will enter (or exit) the beach barefoot, Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Relaxing on Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Relaxing on Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Local transportation, Copacabana (Beach), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Local transportation, Copacabana (Beach), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Several master sand carvers have created mini sand “masterpieces” representing the local scenes, Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Several master sand carvers have created mini sand “masterpieces” representing the local scenes, Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

A local fishing boat, Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

A local fishing boat, Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Locally caught fish for sale at the southern end of Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Locally caught fish for sale at the southern end of Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Sun, sand and water – relaxation time at Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Sun, sand and water – relaxation time at Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Street Art in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

"Etnias", the largest graffiti mural in the world and a legacy of the 2016 Rio, was painted by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra; it is the largest graffiti mural in the world and

“Etnias”, the largest graffiti mural in the world and a legacy of the 2016 Rio, was painted by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Once considered little more than defacement of public property, street art has become an accepted form of visual art around the world.  Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, legalized ‘neo-graffiti’ in 2009, leading to a profusion of outdoor works.  Situated right across the street from our pier, covering 560 feet (170 meters) along Olympic Boulevard, is “Etnias”– the largest graffiti mural in the world and a legacy of the 2016 Rio Olympic Games.  Painted by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra, the work depicts a Tajapo boy from Brazil, a Mursi woman from Ethiopia, a Kayin woman from Thailand, a Supi man from Northern Europe, and a Huli man from Papua New Guinea — embodying the continents that represent the black, blue, green, red, and gold rings on the Olympic flag.  Originally named Todos Somos Um (“We Are One”), the artist’s intention was to show that everyone is connected.  It is the largest street mural spray-painted by a single artist and is nearly twice the size of the previous record holder.  Kobra worked 12 hours a day for two months to complete the mural before the opening ceremony of the Olympics.  In total, it took 45 days, 2,800 cans of spray paint and 180 buckets of acrylic paint to complete.  The artist’s bright colored murals featuring geometric shapes and quilted patterns can also be seen in the street murals of New York City, London, Tokyo, and Amsterdam.

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- a view of “Etnias" from Terminal 4 at Pier Mauâ (where our ship was docked)

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: a view of “Etnias” from Terminal 4 at Pier Mauâ (where our ship was docked)

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- one of the portraits in “Etnias" by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: one of the portraits in “Etnias” by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- portraits of two women in “Etnias" by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: portraits of two women in “Etnias” by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- another portrait in “Etnias" by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: another portrait in “Etnias” by Brazilian graffiti artist Eduardo Kobra

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #1

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #1

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- murals (with a model being photographed by another photographer) on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #2

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: murals (with a model being photographed by another photographer) on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #2

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #3

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #3

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- a mural on billboard between terminals at Pier Mauâ, #4

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: a mural on billboard between terminals at Pier Mauâ, #4

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #5

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #5

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #6

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #6

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art- a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #7

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, street art: a mural on a terminal at Pier Mauâ, #7

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Here, in the dense fog early in the morning of our ascent, at the top of Mount Corcovado, is the symbol of the city, the concrete statue of Christ the Redeemer, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Here, in the dense fog, early on the morning of our ascent, at the top of Mount Corcovado, is the symbol of the city, the concrete statue of Christ the Redeemer, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Rio de Janeiro is a huge seaside city in Brazil, famed for its Copacabana and Ipanema beaches, 30 meter (98 feet) Christ the Redeemer statue atop Mount Corcovado – named one of the New Seven Wonders of the World — and for Sugarloaf Mountain, a granite peak with cable cars to its summit.  The city is also known for its sprawling favelas (shanty towns).  Its raucous Carnaval festival, featuring parade floats, flamboyant costumes and samba dancers, is considered the world’s largest.

“Rio de Janeiro is the second-most populous municipality in Brazil [population of 6.5 million] and the sixth-most populous in the Americas…  Part of the city has been designated as a World Heritage Site, named “Rio de Janeiro: Carioca Landscapes between the Mountain and the Sea”, by UNESCO on 1 July 2012 as a Cultural Landscape.  Founded in 1565 by the Portuguese, the city was initially the seat of the Captaincy of Rio de Janeiro, a domain of the Portuguese Empire…  Rio has a tropical savanna climate that closely borders a tropical monsoon climate.” — Wikipedia

We were fortunate to be able to book an early morning (7 am) van to drive across Rio de Janeiro from the port to the top of Mount Corcovado to visit the symbol of the city, the concrete statue of Christ the Redeemer.  After climbing the last 200 steps to the viewing platform at the base of the statue, we found that the statue, the platform and the entire city were enveloped in fog.  Over the course of the hour we spent there, the fog swirled and a few openings in the fog gave us views of both the statue, which is magnificent, and vistas of portions of the sprawling city, below.

 

Christ the Redeemer is an Art Deco statue of Jesus Christ in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, created by French sculptor Paul Landowski and built by the Brazilian engineer Heitor da Silva Costa a

Christ the Redeemer is an Art Deco statue of Jesus Christ in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, created by French sculptor Paul Landowski and built by the Brazilian engineer Heitor da Silva Costa and constructed between 1922 and 1931

 

Christ the Redeemer is an Art Deco statue of Jesus Christ in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, created by French sculptor Paul Landowski and built by the Brazilian engineer Heitor da Silva Costa, in collaboration with the French engineer Albert Caquot.  Romanian sculptor Gheorghe fashioned the face.  Constructed between 1922 and 1931, the statue is 30 metres (98 feet) tall, excluding its 8-metre (26 feet) pedestal.  The arms stretch 28 metres (92 feet) wide. The statue weighs 635 metric tons, and is located at the peak of the 700-metre (2,300 feet) Corcovado mountain in the Tijuca Forest National Park overlooking the city of Rio de Janeiro.  A symbol of Christianity across the world, the statue has also become a cultural icon of both Rio de Janeiro and Brazil, and is listed as one of the New Seven Wonders of the World.  It is made of reinforced concrete and soapstone.” — Wikipedia

 

While we were at the platform adjacent to the base of Christ the Redeemer at the top of Mount Corcovado, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the fog had momentary moments of clearing to the east whe

While we were at the platform adjacent to the base of Christ the Redeemer at the top of Mount Corcovado, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the fog had momentary moments of clearing to the east where we could see the main beach of Ipanema, beyond Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon

 

From left to right in the distance are Copacabana (just out of the field of view on the left), Ipanema and its beach, and the Jockey Club on the right; in the foreground are the Jardim B

From left to right in the distance are Copacabana (just out of the field of view on the left), Ipanema and its beach, and the Jockey Club on the right; in the foreground are the Jardim Botânico district, the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, and Parque Lage, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

A close-up of Ipanema and its beach, behind the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, with the small islands of Monumento Natural do Arquipélago das Ilhas Cagarras in the distance, Rio de Janeiro

A close-up of Ipanema and its beach, behind the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon, with the small islands of Monumento Natural do Arquipélago das Ilhas Cagarras in the distance, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Museo do Amanhã (The Museum of Tomorrow) is a science museum in the city designed by Spanish neofuturistic architect Santiago Calatrava and built next to the waterfront at Pier Maua, R

Museo do Amanhã (The Museum of Tomorrow) is a science museum in the city designed by Spanish neofuturistic architect Santiago Calatrava and built next to the waterfront at Pier Maua, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Aqua Rio (Aquário Marinho do Rio de Janeiro) is the largest marine aquarium of South America and is located next to the waterfront at Pier Maua, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Aqua Rio (Aquário Marinho do Rio de Janeiro) is the largest marine aquarium of South America and is located next to the waterfront at Pier Maua, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

 

Across from the the waterfront at Pier Maua, on the hill, is a large favela, Brazilian Portuguese for slum -- a low-income, historically informal urban area in Brazil; Rio de Janeiro-8

Across from the the waterfront at Pier Maua, on the hill, is a large favela, Brazilian Portuguese for slum — a low-income, historically informal urban area in Brazil; Rio de Janeiro

 

A favela, Brazilian Portuguese for slum, is a low-income historically informal urban area in Brazil.  The first favela, now known as Providêcia in the center of Rio de Janeiro, appeared in the late 19th century, built by soldiers who had nowhere to live following the Canudos War.  Some of the first settlements were called bairros africanos (African neighborhoods).  Over the years, many former enslaved Africans moved in.  Even before the first favela came into being, poor citizens were pushed away from the city and forced to live in the far suburbs.  However, most modern favelas appeared in the 1970s due to rural exodus, when many people left rural areas of Brazil and moved to cities.  Unable to find places to live, many people found themselves in favelas…    Although favelas are found in urban areas throughout Brazil, many of the more famous ones exist in Rio.” —Wikipedia

 

The central district of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hosts a hodge-podge of architectural styles from various decades of the 20th and 21st centuries; the standout building is in the backgroun

The central district of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, hosts a hodge-podge of architectural styles from various decades of the 20th and 21st centuries; the standout building is in the background, with a crucifix design built into the structure

 

Ponte Presidente Costa e Silva (President Costa e Silva Bridge), completed in 1974, is the longest prestressed concrete bridge in the southern hemisphere and the sixth longest in the wor

Ponte Presidente Costa e Silva (President Costa e Silva Bridge), completed in 1974, is the longest prestressed concrete bridge in the southern hemisphere and the sixth longest in the world; it connects Rio de Janeiro with the northern regions of Brazil

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.