Eat Local: Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Pâté Of Louisiana Rabbit & Chicken Livers, perfumed with truffles, country bread croutons, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana

Pâté Of Louisiana Rabbit & Chicken Livers, perfumed with truffles, country bread croutons, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana

 

After a morning walk of more than 10,000 steps in the French Quarter (see our previous blog post “New Orleans, Louisiana, USA”), we then headed off to eat brunch at Luke (restaurant), just west of the Quarter. We were very glad we had made a reservation, as the restaurant is very popular with the locals and many were enjoying brunch before they headed to the New Orleans Saints NFL playoffs football game later that afternoon.

 

Jumbo Lump Crab Meat, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana--

Jumbo Lump Crab Meat, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana

 

“Luke is a Creole-inspired Brasserie located in the heart of New Orleans’ Central Business District on world-famous St. Charles Avenue, steps from the French Quarter neighborhood.  A lively atmosphere surrounds the raw bar offering the freshest seafood and oysters procured daily from the Gulf of Mexico.  Chef Erick Loos is at the helm of the kitchen featuring dishes that highlight local purveyors and farmers’ market ingredients. Behind the bar, a selection of bartender-created specialty cocktails are offered among a carefully-curated list of wines from throughout the world and locally crafted brews… Erik Loos IV is currently the Executive Chef of Luke Restaurant showing homage to the grand old Franco-German brasseries that once reigned in New Orleans.  Since opening in 2007, Luke has been hailed by Condé Nast Traveler, Travel + Leisure, and The Times Picayune, which applauded Luke for its “disarmingly home-spun culinary touches and broad-shouldered dishes that satisfy something more than just an appetite.” – www.lukeneworleans.com

 

Jumbo Louisiana Shrimp "En Cocotte", roasted jalapeño cheese grits, andouille & green onion sausage, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana

Jumbo Louisiana Shrimp “En Cocotte”, roasted jalapeño cheese grits, andouille & green onion sausage, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana

 

Stuffed P&J Oysters, gulf shrimp and blue crab, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana

Stuffed P&J Oysters, gulf shrimp and blue crab, Luke, New Orleans, Louisiana

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2018 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat Local: El Lagarto (a paladar), Cienfuegos, Cuba

The entrance to El Lagarto, a paladar (privately owned restaurant) in ground level rooms of a private home overlooking the bay in the Punta Gorda district of Cienfuegos, Cuba

The entrance to El Lagarto, a paladar (privately owned restaurant) in ground level rooms of a private home overlooking the bay in the Punta Gorda district of Cienfuegos, Cuba

 

Until a few years ago, restaurants in Cuba were government owned.  That changed with the opening up of some (licensed) private enterprises, including restaurants, repair shops, taxi services (using restored Classic Cars), etc.  The privately run restaurants – often in a room or several rooms of a private house –called paladares, are generally regarded as far superior to the government run restaurants and are eagerly sought out by tourist visitors.  The main staples of the Cuban diet, which comprise the main fare in many of the paladares, are rice and beans (“Christians and Moors”), rice, pork, chicken, plantains (especially fried plantain chips), and beer.  Upscale paladares are now exploring fusion Cuban cuisine with much creativity coming forth in the past few years

 

The main dining room at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba, was built on a covered patio, overlooking the bay

The main dining room at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba, was built on a covered patio, overlooking the bay

 

In Cienfuegos we enjoyed a very good luncheon overlooking the bay from our table at El Lagarto, a family run establishment that was several years old and very popular in the Punta Gorda district.  (A note from Wikipedia: “Paladar is a term that in Spanish translates literally to “Palatal” and used with that meaning in the Spanish speaking world, however in Cuba is used exclusively to refer to restaurants run by self-employers.”)

 

Our “starters” began with fried slices of local plantains, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

Our “starters” began with fried slices of local plantains, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

 

Our “starters” continued with a nice selection of fresh fruit, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

Our “starters” continued with a nice selection of fresh fruit, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

 

With a thunderstorm approaching, the brightly painted “Adirondack-style” chairs on the dock adjacent to the restaurant were empty, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

With a thunderstorm approaching, the brightly painted “Adirondack-style” chairs on the dock adjacent to the restaurant were empty, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

 

For a starter we enjoyed fried eggplant topped with melted cheese and salad, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

For a starter we enjoyed fried eggplant topped with melted cheese and salad, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

 

One main dish was a mixed grill (chicken, pork and lamb) with the traditional side dishes of rice and beans and yucca and squash, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

One main dish was a mixed grill (chicken, pork and lamb) with the traditional side dishes of rice and beans and yucca and squash, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

 

A second (and outstanding) main dish was sliced pork from a whole barbequed pork leg with the traditional side dishes, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba; for dessert we enjoyed a

A second (and outstanding) main dish was sliced pork from a whole barbequed pork leg with the traditional side dishes, luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba; for dessert we enjoyed a traditional flan (not pictured)

 

Walking back through the city after our enjoyable and filling luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

Walking back through the city after our enjoyable and filling luncheon at El Lagarto, Cienfuegos, Cuba

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards.  All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

The Split Dock of Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA, with the mountains of Unalaska Island in the background, across Iliuliuk Bay

The Split Dock of Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA, with the mountains of Unalaska Island in the background, across Iliuliuk Bay

 

The port of Dutch Harbor, on Amaknak Island in the Aleutian Chain – connected by a bridge to the much larger Unalaska Island — consistently ranks as the busiest fishing port in the United States of America.  For the last 30 years, Unalaska’s economy has been based primarily on commercial fishing, seafood processing, fleet services and marine transportation.  Annually, more than 1.7 billion pounds of frozen halibut, salmon and king crab is shipped to domestic and export markets in North America, Europe and Asia, making the Port of Dutch Harbor first in the nation in quantity of catch landed and first or second in the nation in the value of the catch for more than 20 years.  Fans of the Discovery Channel may be familiar with the area, highlighted on the popular series “Deadliest Catch.”  Naturally, sport fishing opportunities are plentiful.  Dutch Harbor is also known for being the only place on American soil other than Pearl Harbor to be bombed by the Japanese.  In June of 1942, two days of air attacks killed 43 American servicemen, but did very little long-term damage to the base.  We had the opportunity to visit the informative Aleutian World War II National Historic Area Visitor Center, adjacent to the small airport on the island — for more details of the story see below.

 

From our mooring at the Kloosterboer Dock, this view looks northeast to the North Pacific Fuel Dock and the Trident Dock; the Ulatka Head Road zigs-zags up the hill around Mr. Ballyhoo

From our mooring at the Kloosterboer Dock, this view looks northeast to the North Pacific Fuel Dock and the Trident Dock; the Ulatka Head Road zigs-zags up the hill around Mr. Ballyhoo (named by Dashiell Hammett — of “The Maltese Falcon” fame — when he was stationed in Dutch Harbor during WW II) to the ruins of Fort Schwatka, the defensive WW II fort that guarded Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

 

A fisherman making repairs to the chains (hundreds of yards-meters long) used on his Pollock fishing boat to hold the large fish net; Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

A fisherman making repairs to the chains (hundreds of yards/meters long) used on his Pollock fishing boat to hold the large fish net; Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

 

Where small towns in New England have “general stores” of a modest size, the Alaska Ship Supply store is a giant combination hardware store and grocery in Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Islan

Where small towns in New England have “general stores” of a modest size, the Alaska Ship Supply store is a giant combination hardware store and grocery in Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA; we bought completely waterproof pants (used by local fishermen) and some kayaking waterproof gloves to add to our foul weather gear on the ship for our expedition travel

 

The Alyeska Seafoods processing facility on Unalaska Island, across the bay from Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

The Alyeska Seafoods processing facility on Unalaska Island, across the bay from Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

 

Homes on Haystack Hill in Unalaska, Unalaska Island, across the bay from Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

Homes on Haystack Hill in Unalaska, Unalaska Island, across the bay from Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

 

The Grand Aleutian Hotel in Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA, where we had had piles of delicious king crab legs as part of a large Sunday buffet lunch at their Chart Room Resta

The Grand Aleutian Hotel in Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA, where we had had piles of delicious king crab legs as part of a large Sunday buffet lunch at their Chart Room Restaurant

 

King crab legs on the Grand Aleutian Hotel_s Chart Room Restaurant_s Sunday buffet, Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

King crab legs on the Grand Aleutian Hotel’s Chart Room Restaurant’s Sunday buffet, Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA

 

At the Aleutian World War II National Historic Area Visitors Center we learned more about the so-called “Aleutian Campaign” of World War II (from 1942 to 1945). “The Aleutian Islands are the setting for a little known story of how America was forced into war to reclaim her own soil during World War II. As Japan expanded her empire across Asia and the Pacific in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the United States hastened to fortify the westernmost defenses of her territory, establishing naval bases and air stations in the Aleutian Islands [part of the Alaska Territory, bought from Russia on 30 March1867 in the so-called “Seward’s Folly” purchase]. Civilian and military crews poured in by the thousands to ready the nation for a war in the North Pacific.

“It came all too soon. In June of 1942, just six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese bombed Unalaska, and seized the islands of Attu and Kista [the westernmost of the Aleutian Islands]. The Japanese troops numbered less than 10,000 men. Within little over a year the United States and her Canadian allies matched that number more than tenfold and defeated the Japanese.

“There were heavy losses on both sides. In the end, however, the weather emerged as the deadliest enemy. For the Alaska Natives in the Aleutians, the war changed their lives forever. Most of the Unangan (Aleut) were exiled thousands of miles from home in filthy disease-ridden camps; the Attuans were captured and transported to Japan. [The U.S. treatment of the Aleutians was similar to the internment of the Japanese during World War II – shameful acts that did not reflect the founding principles of America.] At the end of the war many Unangan found their homes and churches pillaged, their archaeological sites looted, their waters and lands contaminated, and whole islands appropriated as military reserves.

“Thus, [this] is a story of both noble and ignoble events; it is a tale of Americans at war thousands of miles from home and Americans in exile thousands of miles from home. This is the story of the ‘Aleutian Campaign.’” – exhibit signage at the Aleutian World War II National Historic Area Visitor Center

 

The Aleutian World War II National Historic Area Visitor_s Center (and museum), Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA, is adjacent to the Dutch Harbor airport

The Aleutian World War II National Historic Area Visitor Center (and museum), Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA, is adjacent to the Dutch Harbor airport

 

“At Dutch Harbor, the captured [Japanese] Zero [fighter airplane] – see photograph, below — was turned upright by crane, then crated for shipment south. She arrived at North Island, Naval Air Station San Diego on 12 August 1942. The fighter was placed in a balloon hangar, secreted behind a 12-foot high stockade and guarded day and night. Crews worked 24 hours a day, repairing the vertical stabilizer, rudder, wing tips, flaps and canopy. [On] 25 September [1942], the Akutan Zero, the U.S. star now on her wings and fuselage, flied mock combat against the best aircraft in America. These tests affirmed that even the most advanced U.S. plane can not defeat the Zero in its own arena – the low-altitude, slow-speed, twisting dogfight. To survive such an attack, U.S. pilots must first flee – dive away in a near vertical descent, then roll hard right before the Zero can bring its cannon and machine guns to bear. Once disengaged, the battle must be pressed on at high speed — – in swooping attacks from high altitude. Only then can the Zero’s design faults, its inherent fragility, be exploited.’” – exhibit signage at the Aleutian World War II National Historic Area Visitor Center

 

“The Prize of the Aleutians” was found in Dutch Harbor -- a captured, downed Japanese Zero airplane that had been declared by the U.S. War Department (in the late 1930s) to be “…

“The Prize of the Aleutians” was found in Dutch Harbor — a captured, downed Japanese Zero airplane that had been declared by the U.S. War Department (in the late 1930s) to be “…an aerodynamic impossibility” but went on to fly circles around U.S. and allied aircraft in the early 1940s; Dutch Harbor, Amaknak Island, Alaska, USA – photo courtesy Anchorage Museum of History and Art and the Aleutian World War II National Historic Area Visitor Center

 

Legal Notices: All photographs (except “The Prize of the Aleutians”) copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

 

Eat local: Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

Exterior of the Marx Brothers Café -- the home on Third Avenue in downtown Anchorage, Alaska, dates to 1916 and was one of three identical houses built for the local management of the

Exterior of the Marx Brothers Café — the home on Third Avenue in downtown Anchorage, Alaska, dates to 1916 and was one of three identical houses built for the local management of the Alaska Railroad Company during the railroad’s construction

 

We had our best dinner in Alaska — during the course of three weeks sailing up the Inside Passage and then arriving in Anchorage – at the Marx Brothers Café.  The café’s website notes: “The Marx Bros. Café specializes in innovative contemporary cuisine featuring fresh Alaskan seafood and only the finest quality meats.  Our chef revises the menu each night to reflect unique ingredients and imaginative preparations.  Our cuisine is expertly paired with an extensive selection of wines housed in one of Alaska’s largest cellars.”

 

Photograph of Groucho and Harpo Marx (the Marx brothers) in the front hall of the eponymous restaurant in Anchorage, Alaska, USA

Photograph of Groucho and Harpo Marx (the Marx brothers) in the front hall of the eponymous restaurant in Anchorage, Alaska, USA

 

After ordering we asked the maitre’d about the restaurant’s name.  He confirmed that the first night the restaurant opened quite a few years ago was quite chaotic.  The founding partners reflected afterwards that the evening was like being in a Marx brothers’ movie, so they named the restaurant in their honor.

The “official story”: “By 1979, Jack Amon, Van Hale, Ken Brown and Bob Schmidt had made quite a name for themselves in Anchorage’s culinary scene – even if that name was a mouthful!  Together, they had created the Wednesday Night Gourmet Wine Tasting Society and Volleyball Team Which Now Meets on Sunday — a weekly event of food and wine at the Jade Room.  Off nights, they catered festivals and events under the name of The Spaceway Sausage Company.  In the hours after their final dinner on April 1, 1979, they moved their operation and all its accoutrements to a little house on Third Avenue.  The night of the move was spiced with the intrigue and chaos of sleep deprivation and disputed ownership, and anyone walking in on the scene would have thought they were on the set of the old Marx Brother’s movie, ‘A Night at the Opera.’  Nevertheless, they survived the night and named their restaurant the Marx Brother’s Café — officially opening the doors on October 18, 1979.  Over the past 30 years the Marx Bros. Café has grown into an elegant establishment acclaimed by tourists and critics and coveted by locals.”

 

Neapolitan Seafood Mousse- Layers of Maine lobster, smoked salmon and smoked halibut served with toast points, red onion gremolata and American caviar, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, A

Neapolitan Seafood Mousse: Layers of Maine lobster, smoked salmon and smoked halibut served with toast points, red onion gremolata and American caviar, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

 

Copper River Sockeye Gravlax- House made dill cured sockeye salmon with buckwheat blini, honey mustard, dill sour cream and salmon caviar, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

Copper River Sockeye Gravlax: House made dill cured sockeye salmon with buckwheat blini, honey mustard, dill sour cream and salmon caviar, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

 

Halibut Macadamia- Halibut baked in macadamia nuts with coconut curry and mango chutney, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

Halibut Macadamia: Halibut baked in macadamia nuts with coconut curry and mango chutney, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

 

Kodiak Scallops- With house-made fettuccine, artichoke pesto, summer tomato sauce and grilled artichoke, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

Kodiak Scallops: With house-made fettuccine, artichoke pesto, summer tomato sauce and grilled artichoke, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

 

Marx Bro's Cheesecake- Our own special recipe, rich and creamy, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

Marx Bro’s Cheesecake: Our own special recipe, rich and creamy, Marx Brothers Café, Anchorage, Alaska, USA

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local, shop local, make local: Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, best known for its Public Market, is one of the most beloved public spaces in Vancouver

Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, best known for its Public Market, is one of the most beloved public spaces in Vancouver – a self-sustaining redevelopment project that is now home to more than 300 businesses, marinas, fish-mongers, studios and cultural facilities, employing a total of more than 3,000 people

 

“In the early 1900s, Granville Island [inside Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada] was home to factories, plants and sawmills.  Things are a little different today — Granville Island is both a locals’ favorite and a huge draw for visitors.  Technically a sandspit and not an island, the neighbourhood sits just south of the downtown peninsula, right under the Granville Bridge.  The Granville Island Public Market acts as a hub of activity, but it’s also one of the city’s most important cultural districts with theatres, artisan workshops and craft studios.” – http://www.tourismvancouver.com

 

The “silos” that are part of the cement factory on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, have been painted whimsically by a local artist

The “silos” that are part of the cement factory on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, have been painted whimsically by a local artist

 

“What the Government of Canada developed in Granville Island is simply the most successful urban redevelopment in North America, which has drawn — and continues to draw — international attention from planners globally.  In 2002, Great Markets Great Cities presented Granville Island with a PPS Award of Merit for its contribution to the social, economic, and environmental health of Vancouver.  In 2004, Project for Public Spaces, a New York-based nonprofit, named Granville Island the “Best Neighborhood in North America” because of its successful transformation in the 1970s from an industrial wasteland to one of the most beloved public spaces in Vancouver.  The Island is a jewel in the Canadian government’s development crown but it’s just as treasured by locals and tourists for its unique offerings.  Granville Island, itself a piece of art and a destination for more than 10 million people who visit the Island annually, provides a rare example of government as an urban redevelopment standard-setter, creative marketer, and manager in one complete package.  CMHC still manages the operationally self-sustaining Granville Island, now home to more than 300 businesses, marinas, fish-mongers, studios and cultural facilities, employing a total of more than 3,000 people.” – http://www.granvilleisland.com

 

The Public Market on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is probably the island_s best know attraction with a diverse range of vendors offering both fresh produce an

The Public Market on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is probably the island’s best know attraction with a diverse range of vendors offering both fresh produce and fish along with numerous artisinal products

 

“The market itself is often described as a “food lover’s paradise,” and an impromptu picnic is easily picked up between vendors offering cheese, charcuterie, bread and fresh produce.  If you’re looking for something casual but already put together, try the popular food court at the end of the market building.  If a restaurant is more your style, there are some great seafood offerings down here, and there’s nothing like dining by the waterfront.  Don’t forget to fill your glass while you’re down here!  The area is home to an artisan sake maker (the first in Canada), a spirits distillery, and two breweries.” — www.tourismvancouver.com

 

Our early summer visit coincided with the arrival of beautiful local (British Columbia) fruit and produce at the Public Market, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Our early summer visit coincided with the arrival of beautiful local (British Columbia) fruit and produce at the Public Market, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

On our small group (7 of us) tour, we had the opportunity to sample fresh offerings from numerous vendors in the Public Market, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

On our small group (7 of us) tour, we had the opportunity to sample fresh offerings from numerous vendors in the Public Market, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

While many of us consider the northeastern sections of the U.S. and Canada as prime maple syrup country (e.g., Vermont, Quebec), British Columbia produces some excellent edible maple pro

While many of us consider the northeastern sections of the U.S. and Canada as prime maple syrup country (e.g., Vermont, Quebec), British Columbia produces some excellent edible maple products, Granville Island Public Market, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; these syrups were at Maples’ Sugar Shack in the Public Market

 

These interesting fruit “caviars” for use in drinks (such as a glass of Champagne) and desserts are produced by Bubble Bombs Specialty Foods in British Columbia, Granville Island, Va

These interesting fruit “caviars” for use in drinks (such as a glass of Champagne) and desserts are produced by Bubble Bombs Specialty Foods in British Columbia, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; we tasted several and they are authentic fruit flavors in small “caviar”-shaped balls created from a kelp extract

 

Terra Breads Bakery is regarded as one of the best in Vancouver – at the Public Market on Granville Island they sell a broad array of their breads and pastries

Terra Breads Bakery is regarded as one of the best in Vancouver – at the Public Market on Granville Island they sell a broad array of their breads and pastries

 

We tasted one of Terra Breads_ savory “flatbreads” which was excellent – the day we visited they were selling roasted red pepper + spinach focaccia, cheese + herb focaccia and bl

We tasted one of Terra Breads’ savory “flatbreads” which was excellent – the day we visited they were selling roasted red pepper + spinach focaccia, cheese + herb focaccia and black olive + tomato focaccia; Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

The Green movement is very strong at both the national government, local community and individual level in British Columbia-Canada -- this free bicycle "valet" parking service is typical

The Green movement is very strong at both the national government, local community and individual level in British Columbia-Canada — this free bicycle “valet” parking service is typical of the support “Greenies” have, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

The Silk Weaving Studio on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is celebrating 30 years on the island with local weavers; the store has live silkworms munching away on

The Silk Weaving Studio on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is celebrating 30 years on the island with local weavers; the store has live silkworms munching away on their favorites, mulberry leaves

 

“With a mix of unique crafts, skilled artisans, outdoor outfitters and deluxe gourmet stores, Granville Island is one of the best places in the city to purchase souvenirs for back home.  The public market is a great place to start; pick up smoked salmon, exclusive teas, and other gourmet goodies.  Check out the stores in the Net Loft building for First Nations artworks, B.C. wines, and other unique gifts.   Take a stroll along Railspur Alley and the far end of the island to peek into artisan studios where glassblowers, potters, jewellers and even a broom maker ply their crafts.” – www.tourismvancouver.com

 

Your blogger bought this beautiful black and white silk scarf woven by the founder of the Silk Weaving Studio, Diana Sanderson, for the intrepid explorer, Granville Island, Vancouver, Br

Your blogger bought this beautiful black and white silk scarf woven by the founder of the Silk Weaving Studio, Diana Sanderson, for the intrepid explorer, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

Granville Island Broom Co. specializes in the traditional art of handcrafted broom making – the brooms are woven using Shaker methods and are designed to withstand years with regular u

Granville Island Broom Co. specializes in the traditional art of handcrafted broom making – the brooms are woven using Shaker methods and are designed to withstand years with regular use. Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

Sisters Mary and Sarah (pictured) Schwieger learned to make brooms from their family while growing up in the Kootenay Region of British Columbia and strive to combine beauty, function an

Sisters Mary and Sarah (pictured) Schwieger, founders of the Granville Island Broom Co., learned to make brooms from their family while growing up in the Kootenay Region of British Columbia and strive to combine beauty, function and tradition in their unique products, Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 

Artisan Sake Maker at Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, is Canada_s first boutique sake maker producing sustainable and fresh premium sake made from rice 100% grown in fie

Artisan Sake Maker at Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, is Canada’s first boutique sake maker producing sustainable and fresh premium sake made from rice 100% grown in fields in British Columbia; we enjoyed several different styles of sake (including one sparking sake, a first for us!) at their studio on Railspur Alley

 

The Liberty Distillery, established in 2010 on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, ferments and distills on site using 100% British Columbia grains; no neutral grain s

The Liberty Distillery, established in 2010 on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, ferments and distills on site using 100% British Columbia grains; no neutral grain spirits, additives, preservatives, artificial flavors or GMO’s are used

 

The Liberty Distillery on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, produces a broad lineup of hand crafted, traditional spirits including vodka, unaged “whiskey”, “Tr

The Liberty Distillery on Granville Island, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, produces a broad lineup of hand crafted, traditional spirits including vodka, unaged “whiskey”, “Trust Whiskey” and gin; the whole lineup is in the front row of the photograph

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat Local: Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Olo (Restaurant) in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, is a chef-family owned organic farm-to-table restaurant that transforms the freshest ingredients into sophisticated Pacific Northw

Olo (Restaurant) in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, is a chef/family owned organic farm-to-table restaurant that transforms the freshest ingredients into sophisticated Pacific Northwest dishes

 

One of the best meals we’ve recently had was at a chef/family owned organic farm-to-table restaurant, Olo, in Victoria, British Columbia.  The Olo team transforms the freshest ingredients into sophisticated Pacific Northwest dishes.  The restaurant works with local farms and producers to acquire top-notch ingredients.  In addition to the a la carte menu, Olo offers three tasting menus, including “kitchen” (vegetables, fish and meat), vegetarian and vegan dinners. We ordered one of the kitchen tasting menus and one of the vegetarian tasting menus, both with different wine pairings (all wines were from British Columbia, including several grown and produced on Vancouver Island).

 

The restaurant is in a typical early 20th century brick building that has been nicely refurbished, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

The restaurant is in a typical early 20th century brick building that has been nicely refurbished, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Hakurei Turnip Salad with mustard greens, cider sunflower dressing, duise, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Hakurei Turnip Salad with mustard greens, cider sunflower dressing, duise, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Grilled asparagus with egg yolk (sous vide), fresh pressed soy oil, crunchy millet, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; sous vide is a method of cooking in which food is vacuum-seal

Grilled asparagus with egg yolk (sous vide), fresh pressed soy oil, crunchy millet, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; sous vide is a method of cooking in which food is vacuum-sealed in a plastic pouch and then placed in a water bath or steam environment for longer than normal cooking times at an accurately regulated temperature much lower than normally used for cooking

 

Smoked salmon with cultured cream, beets, birch syrup and sorrel, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Smoked salmon with cultured cream, beets, birch syrup and sorrel, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Carrot & mascarpone tortellini with chewy carrots and pea shoots, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Carrot & mascarpone tortellini with chewy carrots and pea shoots, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Roasted cauliflower with roesti (potatoes), spinach, morel mushroom sauce, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Roasted cauliflower with roesti (potatoes), spinach, morel mushroom sauce, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Duck breast with herb doughnuts, fennel, chard, rhubarb sauce, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Duck breast with herb doughnuts, fennel, chard, rhubarb sauce, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Strawberries & Sorrel – sorrel ice cream, strawberry many ways, almond praline, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Strawberries & Sorrel – sorrel ice cream, strawberry many ways, almond praline, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Rhubarb Desset – elderflower ice cream, fennel macaron, granola and salmon berries, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Rhubarb Desset – elderflower ice cream, fennel macaron, granola and salmon berries, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Chocolate Dessert – dark chocolate cake, marshmallow cream, milk chocolate ice cream, chocolate crumb, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Chocolate Dessert – dark chocolate cake, marshmallow cream, milk chocolate ice cream, chocolate crumb, Olo, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat Local: Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

The Tartine Manufactory is the sprawling concept husband-and-wife founder Chad Robertson and Elisabeth Prueitt have wanted to create since opening their wildly popular but cramped Tartin

The Tartine Manufactory is the sprawling concept husband-and-wife founder Chad Robertson and Elisabeth Prueitt have wanted to create since opening their wildly popular but cramped Tartine Bakery and Cafe 15 years ago, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

Our visit to the Heath Building in the Mission District of San Francisco, CA, included a delicious luncheon at the recently opened extension of the renowned Tartine Bakery & Café – Tartine manufactory.  “Pastry chef ELISABETH PRUEITT and her husband, renowned baker CHAD ROBERTSON, are the co-owners of Tartine Bakery and Bar Tartine in San Francisco.  They both trained at the Culinary Institute of America in New York. Elisabeth and Chad traveled, trained, and cooked in France and upon their return, opened Bay Village Bakery in Point Reyes Station, California.  Using a wood fired brick oven, they baked bread and created rustic, elegant pastries using many of the techniques they had learned abroad.  Chad’s bread garnered the attention of Alain Ducasse, who wrote about the couple in his book, Harvesting Excellence.  After 6 years of baking in the countryside, they relocated to San Francisco to open Tartine Bakery in 2002.  Elisabeth was named Pastry Chef of the Year in San Francisco Magazine.  Tartine Bakery is continually rated in the Zagat Survey as Best Bakery and Best Breakfast in San Francisco. Elisabeth and Chad were nominated for James Beard Award for Outstanding Pastry Chefs in 2006 and 2007, and won the award in 2008.  Their first book, Tartine, published by Chronicle Books, was chosen by Corby Kummer of the Atlantic Monthly in the New York Times list of selected top ten cookbooks of 2006. It was also nominated for a James Beard award for the photography of France Ruffenach.  Tartine Bread, Chad’s second book, published by Chronicle Books is in current release: Fall 2010.” – “About” Tartine Bakery on the Tartine Bakery Facebook home page

 

Loaves of Tartine Bakery bread cooling before going on sale at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

Loaves of Tartine Bakery bread cooling before going on sale at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

Preparing dough for baking for the delicious bread at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

Preparing dough for baking for the delicious bread at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

Finished bread loaves at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

Finished bread loaves at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

The dining room at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner; we visited for a superb luncheon (our dishes follow…)

The dining room at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner; we visited for a superb luncheon (our dishes follow…)

 

“After years of development, the sequel to San Francisco’s famed Tartine Bakery will finally open its doors this week.  At 555 Alabama Street, Tartine Manufactory is not far from the original Guerrero St. location, but the 5,000-square-foot space is miles away in manifestation.  With a 100-seat restaurant, ice cream shop, espresso bar and bakery, the Manufactory is the sprawling concept husband-and-wife founder Chad Robertson and Elisabeth Prueitt have wanted to create since opening their wildly popular but cramped bakery and cafe 15 years ago.  ‘We’ve been completely maxed out and overflowing at the bakery for 10 or 12 years now,’ Robertson said.  The Manufactory is located in the converted laundry factory that Sausalito-based Heath Ceramics transformed into a second factory and showroom in 2012.  Since then, Heath founders Robin Petravic and Catherine Bailey have been searching for the right tenant to fill the large, light-filled space next door.” – San Francisco Business Times

 

Our starter was two open face sandwiches (“tartines”, fancy French open-faced sandwiches topped with spreadable ingredients) – smoked trout and avocado, Tartine Manufactory, San Fr

Our starter was two open face sandwiches (“tartines”, fancy French open-faced sandwiches topped with spreadable ingredients) – smoked trout and avocado, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

Next was a crispy Maryland softshell crab sandwich with aioli nero, fennel, spring onion, upland cress on a grilled brioche bun, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

Next was a crispy Maryland softshell crab sandwich with aioli nero, fennel, spring onion, upland cress on a grilled brioche bun, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

Lemon cucumber salad with tahini, blackberry, bronze fennel, pickled rhubarb (vegetarian), Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

Lemon cucumber salad with tahini, blackberry, bronze fennel, pickled rhubarb (vegetarian), Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

BBQ lamb sandwich with harissa, breakfast radish, cucumber & yogurt on a grilled brioche bun, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

BBQ lamb sandwich with harissa, breakfast radish, cucumber & yogurt on a grilled brioche bun, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

A desert of blueberries atop a delicious mousse, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

A desert of blueberries atop a delicious mousse, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

An excellent cappuccino at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA--

An excellent cappuccino at Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

Almond brioche topped with mascarpone and fresh plum slices, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

Almond brioche topped with mascarpone and fresh plum slices, Tartine Manufactory, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2017 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.