Eat local: Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (2020)

Our favorite seafood retailer at the Sydney Fish Market is Peter’s Sydney Fish Market; Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Our favorite seafood retailer at the Sydney Fish Market is Peter’s Sydney Fish Market; Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Our favorite food shopping in Sydney is at the Sydney Fish Market on Blackwattle Bay near the eastern end of Anzac Bridge, not far from where we were docked at White Bay.   Sydney Fish Market’s six seafood retailers offer Australia’s biggest variety of fresh seafood.  The site also features numerous restaurants and cafés, a bakery, butcher, gourmet deli, greengrocer, bottle shop, fishing supplies store and gift shop.  We went in the late morning to purchase fresh fish and seafood (some to be frozen for cooking in the future) and then sat at side tables at Peter’s Sydney Fish Market for a light lunch, all fresh fish and seafood from Peter’s Market (see the last photograph, below).

 

The sushi grade scampi taste as good as they look!; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

The sushi grade scampi taste as good as they look!; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

 

Note that all prices are Australian dollars per kilogram (2.2 pounds).  At the time of our visit this winter, one Australian dollar had an exchange rate of $0.66 US.  Thus seafood costing AU$40 per kilo was equivalent to US$12 per pound.

 

Cooked Eastern rock lobsters were high priced, but were tasty, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

Cooked Eastern rock lobsters were high priced, but were tasty, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia – we enjoyed some for lunch after our shopping (see the last photograph)

 

Peter’s Sydney Fish Market sells a wide variety of fresh fish, mostly from local waters but extending around the coast of Australia and Tasmania; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Peter’s Sydney Fish Market sells a wide variety of fresh fish, mostly from local waters but extending around the coast of Australia and Tasmania; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

We bought some of the extra-large green wild tiger prawns to boil and then eat for lunch as a “shrimp-a-peel” back on the ship; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

We bought some of the extra-large green wild tiger prawns to boil and then eat for lunch as a “shrimp-a-peel” back on the ship; Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

“Sydney Fish Market (SFM) is the largest market of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere and the world’s second largest seafood market in terms of variety outside of Japan.  A working fish market, SFM sources product both nationally and internationally and trades over 14,500 tonnes of seafood annually — with up to a hundred species traded every day.  SFM employs approximately fifty-seven staff to organise the weekday wholesale auction, promote Sydney Fish Market as the centre of seafood excellence and operate the Sydney Seafood School.  Since opening in 1989, Sydney Seafood School has played an important part in persuading Sydney residents to eat more fish.  The School is considered to be one of Australia’s leading cooking schools.” — www.tripadvisor.com

 

Extra large (cooked) tiger prawns, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Extra-large (cooked) tiger prawns, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Octopus, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Octopus, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Calamari, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Calamari, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Yellow fin bream, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Yellow fin bream, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Live marron, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia -- Marron is a name given to two closely related species of crayfish in Western Australia

Live marron, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia — marron is a name given to two closely related species of crayfish in Western Australia

 

For lunch at Peter’s Sydney Fish Market, we each started with one half of a cooked lobster and a sushi grade scampi, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

For lunch at Peter’s Sydney Fish Market, we each started with one half of a cooked lobster and a sushi grade scampi, Sydney Fish Market, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2020 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Yuan Yuan Restaurant, Shanghai, China

Yuan Yuan Restaurant in the French Concession, Shanghai, China, is one of the premier, authentic Shanghainese restaurants in the city, where our Context Travel food tour guide knew the owner and staff

Yuan Yuan Restaurant in the French Concession, Shanghai, China, is one of the premier, authentic Shanghainese restaurants in the city, where our Context Travel food tour guide knew the owner and staff and ordered what she considered some of the highlight typical dishes of Shanghai

 

Following our walking tour of the Guangyuan Lu Market (a so-called “wet market” — 菜市场, cài shìchǎng) in the French Concession [see our previous blog post, “Shop local: Guangyuan Lu [‘wet’] Market, French Concession, Shanghai, China (2019)”, our guide from Context Travel tours walked us through the neighborhood, ending up at one of the premier, authentic Shanghainese restaurants in the city, Yuan Yuan Restaurant, where she knew the owner and staff.   With some input from our small group, she ordered what she considered some of the highlight typical dishes of Shanghai.  It was an excellent meal and opened out eyes to the diversity of ingredients and flavors in the local cuisine.

 

Crystal Shrimp (a local specialty), Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Crystal Shrimp (a local specialty), Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

 

Tea-Smoked Duck, Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Tea-Smoked Duck, Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

 

Red Braised Pork (a real signature dish of the city, alternatively available for locals as red braised eel), Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Red Braised Pork (a real signature dish of the city, alternatively available for locals as red braised eel), Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

 

Local Dumplings, Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Local Dumplings, Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

 

Eggplant with Pork, Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Eggplant with Pork, Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

 

Rice Cakes (noodles) with Greens and Pork, Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Rice Cakes (noodles) with Greens and Pork, Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

 

Braised Chicken (another local specialty), Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Braised Chicken (another local specialty), Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

 

Amerinth greens (generally purple in color, not green – a local specialty), Yuan Yuan Resuarant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Amerinth greens (generally purple in color, not green – a local specialty), Yuan Yuan Restaurant, French Concession, Shanghai, China

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Shop local: Guangyuan Lu [“wet’] Market, French Concession, Shanghai, China (2019)

The Guangyuan Lu Market (a so-called “wet market” -- 菜市场, cài shìchǎng) in the French Concession is inside this modern building – a newer location for an old neighborhood institution, Shanghai, China

The Guangyuan Lu Market (a so-called “wet market” — 菜市场, cài shìchǎng) in the French Concession is inside this modern building – a newer location for an old neighborhood institution, Shanghai, China

 

On one of our last days in Shanghai we organized another small group of friends to do a “food tour” of Shanghai — going behind the scenes with a local expert guide on a Context Travel walking food tour in the French Concession.  As their description notes, “It would be remiss to leave the buzzing city of Shanghai without tasting the city’s unique gastronomic delights.  As a center of trade, commerce, and migration, Shanghainese cuisine has assimilated the cuisines of nearby regions including Ningbo, Suzhou, Wuxi, Hangzhou, Nanjing, and Shaoxing.  As a result, it provides an excellent lens to experience and study Chinese food traditions.  During this 3-hour Shanghai Food Tour, we’ll visit a neighborhood Shanghai [wet] market and have lunch in a one of the city’s best and most authentic Shanghainese restaurants, all curated by a veteran food expert.”

 

This blog post covers our walking tour of the Guangyuan Lu Market (a so-called “wet market” — 菜市场, cài shìchǎng) in the French Concession.  Our next blog post, “Eat local: Yuan Yuan Restaurant, Shanghai, China” will showcase the local Shanghainese cuisine at our luncheon with our guide.

 

Fresh vegetables and greens for sale at a vendor’s stall, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Fresh vegetables and greens for sale at a vendor’s stall, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

Rice wine in containers, known as “China Shaoxing” -- for the city of Shaoxing, known for its locally produced rice wine; Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Rice wine in containers, known as “China Shaoxing” — for the city of Shaoxing, known for its locally produced rice wine; Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

“Stocked with all the fresh produce and live animals that hungry Shanghai residents could ever cook up, wet markets are an essential alternative to the brand-name supermarkets vying for their slice of market share in the country with the planet’s largest population.  These markets are so named because the floor tends to be wet, thanks to the live fish flopping around and the vendors’ habit of throwing water on the ground to keep the area clean.  With dozens of independent stalls in each market, competition is fierce, resulting in low prices (even cheaper if you bargain a bit), beautiful displays of produce, and the freshest fish and fowl to be had, butchered and cleaned right before your eyes.  You won’t find shrink-wrapped plastic or expiration dates here.

“Shanghai locals and restaurateurs alike still depend on these independent neighborhood markets for the freshest goods, a bit of social interaction, and the opportunity to keep their bargaining skills sharp.  With the unending time, social and economic pressures facing young Chinese professionals, the profile of the average shopper tends to fall squarely in the “well past retired” category here.  Cooking is a pastime enjoyed mostly by those with the luxury of time, or carried out dutifully by ayis, salaried ‘aunties’ who find themselves working in the homes of so many Shanghainese families.” — https://culinarybackstreets.com/cities-category/shanghai/2013/shanghai-wet-markets/

 

Several vendors had a big variety of eggs, including quail eggs (middle upper left), Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Several vendors had a big variety of eggs, including quail eggs (middle upper left), Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

Fresh wheat flour noodles in a large variety of shapes, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Fresh wheat flour noodles in a large variety of shapes, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

The fermented greens reminded us of the markets in South Korea; Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

The fermented greens reminded us of the markets in South Korea; Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

Pork sausages of a variety of styles and duck confit, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Pork sausages of a variety of styles and duck confit, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

Dried mushrooms and legumes, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Dried mushrooms and legumes, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

As we strolled through the market our guide discussed with us some of the fundamental food concepts in China, such as the importance of sharing meals, the emphasis on freshness and vegetables, and the central role of texture in cooking.  She also discussed the central role of pork in the Chinese diet and why China is the only country in the world with a strategic pork reserve

 

Pork is a mainstay protein in Chinese cuisine – it’s so important that China has a strategic pork reserve, comparable to the United States’ strategic petroleum reserve; Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Pork is a mainstay protein in Chinese cuisine – it’s so important that China has a strategic pork reserve, comparable to the United States’ strategic petroleum reserve; Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

Rice comes in many varieties and quality levels (with a range of prices, as noted in the labels), Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

Rice comes in many varieties and quality levels (with a range of prices, as noted in the labels), Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China

 

Fresh fish, seafood and eels, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China
Fresh fish, seafood and eels, Guangyuan Lu Market, Shanghai, China
Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

 

Eat local: Okonomiyaki (a savory pancake), Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

From the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, we walked through the covered Hondori shopping arcade to Okonomimura where we had okonomiyaki (a savory pancake) for lunch, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

From the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, we walked through the covered Hondori shopping arcade to Okonomimura where we had okonomiyaki (a savory pancake) for lunch, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

 

Hiroshima, Japan’s culinary profile attracts foodies from around the globe.  Birthplace of Japan’s famous okonomiyaki (a savory pancake), the city’s version of the dish is a must-try for gastronomes.  Piled inside a thin crepe are layers of shredded cabbage, meat or seafood, fried noodles, and an egg; all topped with sauce, seaweed flakes and, optionally cheese or sliced green onions (scallions).  From the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, we walked through the covered Hondori shopping arcade to Okonomimura, an 8-story building with a collection of okonomiyaki restaurants on the second, third and fourth floors, all little mom-and-pop, hole-in-the-wall “restaurants” specializing in the city’s signature meal.  We read brief English language descriptions of the various restaurants and liked the descriptions of those on the second floor, where we headed.  Only about half were open, so we chose one in the front corner of the building filled with Japanese customers.  Luckily, they had an English-language menu so we were able to order two different okonomiyaki for lunch with a draft beer.  We sat at the counter, watching with great interest the construction and cooking of our made-to-order okonomiyaki on a hot griddle.  They were quite delicious and very filling.  No desert needed!

 

Okonomimura (on the right), an 8-story building with a collection of okonomiyaki restaurants on the second, third and fourth floors, all little mom-and-pop, hole-in-the-wall “restaurants” specializing in the city’s signature meal, okonomiyaki

Okonomimura (on the right), an 8-story building with a collection of okonomiyaki restaurants on the second, third and fourth floors, all little mom-and-pop, hole-in-the-wall “restaurants” specializing in the city’s signature meal, okonomiyaki (a savory pancake), Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

 

There was a staff of 5 or 6 to prepare the okonomiyaki (a savory pancake) on the hot griddles for a total of only about 14 seats (customers) at the L-shaped counters in front of the griddles, Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

There was a staff of 5 or 6 to prepare the okonomiyaki (a savory pancake) on the hot griddles for a total of only about 14 seats (customers) at the L-shaped counters in front of the griddles, Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

 

After making the pancakes on the griddle, the okonomiyaki were piled high with shredded cabbage, proteins (pork in one, pork and shrimp in a second), with oil for cooking poured on; Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

After making the pancakes on the griddle, the okonomiyaki were piled high with shredded cabbage, proteins (pork in one, pork and shrimp in a second), with oil for cooking poured on; Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

 

After cracking an egg and spreading it on the griddle to a circle the size of the pancake, the okonomiyaki was flipped over on top of the cooking egg; Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

After cracking an egg and spreading it on the griddle to a circle the size of the pancake, the okonomiyaki was flipped over on top of the cooking egg; Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

 

The finished shrimp and pork okonomiyaki topped with shredded dried seaweed; Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

The finished shrimp and pork okonomiyaki topped with shredded dried seaweed; Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

 

The finished pork okonomiyaki with udon noodles and topped with sliced green onions (scallions); Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

The finished pork okonomiyaki with udon noodles and topped with sliced green onions (scallions); Okonomimura, Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

 

The road north from Okonomimura, where we had lunch, to the Shukkeien Garden [see our upcoming blog post], through downtown Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

The road north from Okonomimura, where we had lunch, to the Shukkeien Garden [see our upcoming blog post], through downtown Hiroshima, Honshu Island, Japan

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Jagalchi (Seafood) Market, Busan, South Korea (2019)

One of the main streets in Busan, South Korea, the country’s second-largest city and one of Lonely Planet’s top cities to visit in Southeast Asia a year ago

One of the main streets in Busan, South Korea, the country’s second-largest city and one of Lonely Planet’s top cities to visit in Southeast Asia a year ago

 

“Home to majestic mountains, glistening beaches, steaming hot springs and fantastic seafood, South Korea’s second-largest city [population 3.4 million] is a rollicking port town with tons to offer.  From casual tent bars and chic designer cafes to fish markets teeming with every species imaginable, Busan (부산) has something for all tastes.  Rugged mountain ranges slice through the urban landscape, and events such as the Busan International Film Festival [early October 2019] underscore the city’s desire to be a global meeting place.” – www.lonelyplanet.com

 

Busan captivates visitors with its intriguing history, artistic spirit, delicious street food, and cosmopolitan personality.  Important sights to see include the poignant United Nations Memorial Park and sacred Buddha relics at Tongdosa Temple.  Locals and visitors can enjoy a hike along the stunning coast of Taejongdae Park and explore regional history at the Busan Museum.  You don’t have to be a cook or chef to marvel at the unrivaled selection of fresh fish at the massive Jagalchi Market – the largest in South Korea.  Experiences as varied as wandering the winding alleys of Gamcheon Culture Village (now a creative community of brightly painted houses on the slope of a coastal mountain, originally home to refugees during and after the Korean War) or indulging in the local cuisine along Gwangbokdong Food Street show that Busan delivers great opportunities for exploration.

 

Archway over the entrance to a shopping street leading to BIFF (Busan International Film Festival) Square, Busan, South Korea

Archway over the entrance to a shopping street leading to BIFF (Busan International Film Festival) Square, Busan, South Korea

 

A pedestrian shopping street near BIFF Square lined with food carts in advance of the opening of the 2019 Busan International Film Festival, Busan, South Korea

A pedestrian shopping street near BIFF Square lined with food carts in advance of the opening of the 2019 Busan International Film Festival, Busan, South Korea

 

A downtown street food vendor with typical South Korean snacks , Busan, South Korea

A downtown street food vendor with typical South Korean snacks , Busan, South Korea

 

A street full of fish and seafood stores and restaurants, across from the Jagalchi Seafood Market in downtown Busan, South Korea

A street full of fish and seafood stores and restaurants, across from the Jagalchi Seafood Market in downtown Busan, South Korea

 

The street-side front aisle (one of three), nearly one city-block long, lined with fish and seafood vendors in Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

The street-side front aisle (one of three), nearly one city-block long, lined with fish and seafood vendors in Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

 

Shoppers and chefs can wander the first floor of South Korea’s largest fish and seafood market for an unrivaled selection of raw, dried, and cooked varieties.  The majority of vendors are traditionally female and have earned the nickname Jagalchi Ajumma (married woman).  The second floor of the market features various seafood restaurants that will cook seafood purchased on the first floor and serve it at seats in their restaurant.

 

Beautifully colorful scallops front and center amid an array of octopus, clams and crab in a stall at Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

Beautifully colorful scallops front and center amid an array of octopus, clams and crab in a stall at Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

 

A variety of fresh and smoked fish in a stall at Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

A variety of fresh and smoked fish in a stall at Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

 

Fresh Asian abalone (very expensive!), Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

Fresh Asian abalone (very expensive!), Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

 

A variety of shrimp and prawns at a stall in Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

A variety of shrimp and prawns at a stall in Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

 

A vendor – a Jagalchi Ajumma (married woman) – cleaning squid at her stall in Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

A vendor – a Jagalchi Ajumma (married woman) – cleaning squid at her stall in Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

 

This crab looked like it just finished yoga and was saying “Namaste”, Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

This crab looked like it just finished yoga and was saying “Namaste”, Jagalchi Seafood Market, Busan, South Korea

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Ōmi-chō Market and Morimori Sushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

One of the 170 vendors in the famed Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan, that has been supporting Kanazawa’s gastronomic culture since the middle of the 18th century

One of the 170 vendors in the famed Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan, that has been supporting Kanazawa’s gastronomic culture since the middle of the 18th century

 

From our ship in the port, one day in Kanazawa we headed downtown mid-day and went to the famed Ōmi-chō Market where there is a dizzying array of local produce and fresh seafood.  We planned our time there so we could get a number at Morimori Sushi (restaurant) and shop while we waited for our turn to be seated (see below).  The market has directly supported Kanazawa’s gastronomic culture since the middle of the 18th century.  It has more than 170 vendors selling local delicacies, clothing, fruits, Kaga vegetables, seafood and meats.  Additionally, there are several restaurants and ramen shops within the market building.  We splurged at the market and bought some beautiful sliced wagy-like beef for a home cooked dinner in our apartment, with special local mushrooms and fresh vegetables.

 

An array of beautiful (and colorful) fresh produce at a vendor’s stall in Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

An array of beautiful (and colorful) fresh produce at a vendor’s stall in Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

Notice the packaging of these melons – quite special, with prices to match (US$18 to US$30, EACH!) -- Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

Notice the packaging of these melons – quite special, with prices to match (US$18 to US$30, EACH!) — Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

While you’re splurging, how about one crab for US$80? -- Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

While you’re splurging, how about one crab for US$80? — Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

Then there’s the wagyu-like beef slices, which are about US$40 per pound (it’s actually priced in Japanese Yen per kilogram (2.2 pounds)), Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

Then there’s the wagyu-like beef slices, which are about US$40 per pound (it’s actually priced in Japanese Yen per kilogram (2.2 pounds)), Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

We ended up paying about US7.50 for one of these special local mushrooms to accompany our lightly pan seared (in lard in a cast iron skillet) wagyu-like beef

We ended up paying about US7.50 for one of these special local mushrooms to accompany our lightly pan seared (in lard in a cast iron skillet) wagyu-like beef slices – it was quite different from button mushrooms and porcini and king mushrooms, and had a nice spiciness; Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

Morimori Sushi is Kanazawa’s most recommended conveyer-belt sushi restaurant, offering sushi of outstanding freshness; Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

Morimori Sushi is Kanazawa’s most recommended conveyer-belt sushi restaurant, offering sushi of outstanding freshness; Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan – here the intrepid traveler is receiving a platter of specially ordered tuna (maguro and toro) for lunch

 

Morimori Sushi is Kanazawa’s most recommended conveyer-belt sushi restaurant, offering sushi of outstanding freshness.  We were forewarned that there is always a line to get in, so we arrived earlier than our desired luncheon time, put in our names, got a ticket with a number, and then shopped in Ōmi-chō market for a half hour before our turn came up to be seated at the counter.  In addition to selecting items from the conveyer belt, diners can (and we mostly did) order from an online iPad menu.

 

Tuna (five kinds, including toro (fatty tuna belly)) on a platter at Morimori Sushi, Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

Tuna (five kinds, including toro (fatty tuna belly)) on a platter at Morimori Sushi, Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

Delicious, sweet shrimp (ebi) sushi at Morimori Sushi, Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

Delicious, sweet shrimp (ebi) sushi at Morimori Sushi, Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

It has to be special when you pay US$23 for five nicely boxed apple pears at the Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

It has to be special when you pay US$23 for five nicely boxed apple pears at the Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

Local seafood delicacies and other prepared foods, including tofu; Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

Local seafood delicacies and other prepared foods, including tofu; Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

We saw only one sake store in all of Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

We saw only one sake store in all of Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

We returned to our favorite food vendor from our previous visit, selling yellowtail tataki and salmon tataki, which we had thoroughly enjoyed – this time we bought several (frozen and vacuum packed, so it travels well!); Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa

We returned to our favorite food vendor from our previous visit, selling yellowtail tataki and salmon tataki, which we had thoroughly enjoyed – this time we bought several (frozen and vacuum packed, so it travels well!); Ōmi-chō Market, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan [Tataki is a Japanese food preparation method where the meat or fish is very briefly seared over a hot flame (or in a pan) and then thinly sliced and seasoned with ginger (ground or pounded) and served with soy sauce and garnishes, like sashimi.]

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Otomezushi , Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

The charming wooden exterior of the excellent (but hidden from street view) sushi restaurant, Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan, where we enjoyed an outstanding luncheon

The charming wooden exterior of the excellent (but hidden from street view) sushi restaurant, Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan, where we enjoyed an outstanding luncheon

 

After our self-guided walking tour of Kenrokuen Garden, we walked over to the Naga-machi (old samurai) neighborhood, where, with the guidance of Google maps, we were able to walk behind a fence along a hidden path by a hostel to find a jewel of a sushi restaurant, Otomezushi.  Luckily, we had made a reservation considerably in advance of our arrival in Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan, as the sushi counter has only eight coveted seats and the restaurant has just a few small tables in the adjacent small dining room.  We were greeted by a very friendly sushi chef behind the counter who spoke some English and made us feel right at home, leaving the menu selection (8 pieces of sushi for lunch, plus soup and beverages) up to him – omakase.  Our hour-plus luncheon turned out to be some of the best sushi we have ever eaten.  Back on the ship a little reading online brought us several critical reviews noting that Otomezushi is not only the best sushi restaurant in Kanazawa (a city of nearly 500,000), but is considered one of the best sushi restaurants in Japan.

 

We were mesmerized by the skills of the master sushi chef (we were seated at the center of the counter, giving us bulls-eye dead center seats for watching the preparation of all sushi for the restaurant over lunch), and, being surrounded by all Japanese diners, felt it would be inappropriate to photograph the individual servings of sushi.  The chef did agree to let me take a couple of photographs at the end of the meal.  Unfortunately, the photographs can’t fully convey how fresh the seafood was and the expertise of the chef in cutting and preparing the fish and seafood, rolling the rice, and then adding wasabi, sauces and garnishes to each individual piece of sushi.  Definitely the best uni we have ever eaten, and the toro (super fatty tuna) was right up there, too.  A fabulous experience (both the theater of watching all the preparations and the enjoyment of the superb sushi) – and we were very pleasantly surprised at how reasonable the total bill was.  Otomezushi gets our highest recommendation.

 

The master sushi chef preparing individual pieces of sushi – our seats were at the counter, right in front of the chef; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

The master sushi chef preparing individual pieces of sushi – our seats were at the counter, right in front of the chef; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

The chef’s sushi knife and a selection of fresh fish and prawns in the cooler at the preparation counter, viewed from our seats; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

The chef’s sushi knife and a selection of fresh fish and prawns in the cooler at the preparation counter, viewed from our seats; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

The master sushi chef preparing calamari by scoring the surface in several directions – it was amazingly tender; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

The master sushi chef preparing calamari by scoring the surface in several directions – it was amazingly tender; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

A broader view of the selection of fresh fish and seafood in the coolers at the preparation counter; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

A broader view of the selection of fresh fish and seafood in the coolers at the preparation counter; Otomezushi, Kanazawa, Honshu Island, Japan

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands (Føroyar)

Frumbiti Restaurant in Tórshavn, Faroe Islands, focuses on offering the bounty that the Faroese nature has to offer -- the menu features both classic and seasonally inspired dishes from locally sourced meats, fish and vegetables

Frumbiti Restaurant in Tórshavn, Faroe Islands, focuses on offering the bounty that the Faroese nature has to offer — the menu features both classic and seasonally inspired dishes from locally sourced meats, fish and vegetables

 

We had a nice introduction to some Faroese cuisine with a small family dinner at Frumbiti Restaurant in Tórshavn, Faroe Islands.  The two-month old restaurant on the ground floor of a hotel in the center of the city focuses on offering “the bounty that the Faroese nature has to offer.  The menu features both classic and seasonally inspired dishes from locally sourced meats, fish and vegetables.”  Their philosophy is the same as the concepts behind so-called “California Cuisine” inaugurated by Alice Waters of Chez Panisse (restaurant) in Berkeley, California, USA, in the early 1970s.  We all enjoyed the really fresh cuisine and appreciated the introduction to Faroese dining – with our small group sharing the dishes.

 

A first course of a cold salad of local haddock, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

A first course of a cold smoked salad of local haddock, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

 

A first course of a yellow and green zucchini salad with herbs and orange slices, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

A first course of a yellow and green zucchini salad with herbs and orange slices, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

 

A first course of local salmon tartar with a delicious homemade mayonnaise topped with lemon peel and pepper, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; this was our favorite starter

A first course of local salmon tartar with a delicious homemade mayonnaise topped with lemon zest and pepper, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; this was our favorite starter

 

A side dish of sliced cucumber and green apple salad with fresh herbs, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

A side dish of sliced cucumber and green apple salad with fresh herbs, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

 

A side dish of pan roasted local potatoes, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands – really delicious, with a crusty skin and soft insides

A side dish of pan roasted local potatoes, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands – really delicious, with a crusty skin and soft insides

 

A main course of pan sautéed shredded local lamb with vegetables, Frumbiti Rest., Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; our favorite main, with excellent flavors and a nice contrast between the crunchy top of the lamb and the juicy shredded lamb below

A main course of pan sautéed shredded local lamb with vegetables, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; our favorite main course, with excellent flavors and a nice contrast between the crunchy top of the lamb and the juicy shredded lamb below

 

A main course of seafood chowder with a slice of homemade bread, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; a nice array of local fish and shellfish in an excellent broth

A main course of seafood chowder with a slice of homemade bread, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; a nice array of local fish and shellfish in an excellent broth

 

A main course of Reydsprøka, the local fish in a delicious sauce and a garbanzo bean salad underneath, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

A main course of Reydsprøka, the local fish in a delicious sauce and a garbanzo bean salad underneath, Frumbiti Restaurant, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands

 

As we walked back from the center of town to catch a ride at the ferry terminal, back to our ship in port about 12 miles (19 kilometers) north, we passed the harbor with reflections of the harbor buildings and beautiful twilight sky colors

As we walked back from the center of town to catch a ride at the ferry terminal, back to our ship in port about 12 miles (19 kilometers) north, we passed the harbor with reflections of the harbor buildings and beautiful twilight sky colors

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud at the Merrion Hotel, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Exterior of the Merrion Hotel, one of the leading hotels in Europe, that occupies one of the finest, most beautifully restored and best located Georgian buildings in Dublin City Center, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Exterior of the Merrion Hotel, one of the leading hotels in Europe, that occupies one of the finest, most beautifully restored and best located Georgian buildings in Dublin City Center, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

One evening in Dublin we had the pleasure of joining a group from the ship for a tour of the Merrion Hotel, one of the leading hotels in Europe, followed by cocktails and a private dinner at Ireland’s only Michelin two-star restaurants (on the one night a week the restaurant is normally closed).  We were very fortunate to have had three leading Irish officials join the group and make presentations after dinner – offering very insightful perspectives on the current Irish political and economic situation, particularly with respect to the upcoming decisions in the United Kingdom regarding Brexit.

“The Merrion Hotel occupies one of the finest, most beautifully restored and best located Georgian buildings in Dublin City Center.  Our reputation is rooted in a happy marriage of effortless style and unparalleled service, making us one of the finest 5 star hotels Ireland has to offer.  Our 123 guest rooms and 19 suites are light and airy, decorated in colours selected from a subtle palette inspired by one of Paul Henry’s Irish landscape paintings which hangs in the Front Hall of the Hotel… During the spring and summer months, guests can enjoy the tranquillity of the Garden Terrace, while the Drawing Rooms, with their open log fires,  are perfect for Afternoon Tea at any time of the year.  The Tethra Spa’s calming interiors make it an ideal place to unwind, and to restore and invigorate both body and mind.  Whether on a business or a leisure trip why not unwind in our infinity swimming pool and steam room.  The Merrion is home to two bars and two restaurants, including Ireland’s only 2 star-Michelin Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud.” – http://www.merrionhotel.com

 

Georgian Drawing Rooms, The Merrion Hotel, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Georgian Drawing Rooms, The Merrion Hotel, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

The Merrion Hotel’s 123 guest rooms and 19 suites are light and airy, decorated in colors selected from a subtle palette inspired by one of Paul Henry’s Irish landscape paintings which hangs in the Front Hall of the Hotel, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

The Merrion Hotel’s 123 guest rooms and 19 suites are light and airy, decorated in colors selected from a subtle palette inspired by one of Paul Henry’s Irish landscape paintings which hangs in the Front Hall of the Hotel, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

The Merrion Gardens, The Merrion Hotel – “As a city centre hotel, The Merrion is uniquely privileged to have two period gardens, designed by Jim Reynolds, the noted Irish landscape artist”, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

The Merrion Gardens, The Merrion Hotel – “As a city centre hotel, The Merrion is uniquely privileged to have two period gardens, designed by Jim Reynolds, the noted Irish landscape artist”, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

The Cellar Bar offers a casual gastro-pub menu in the basement of The Merrion Hotel, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

The Cellar Bar offers a casual gastro-pub menu in the basement of The Merrion Hotel, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

Painting in the Merrion Hotel, “The Battle of The Boyne 1690” by Jan Van Huchtenbburg 1647 – 1733. King Janes II was defeated by William of Orange. After the Battle, James fled first to Dublin and then to France

Painting in the Merrion Hotel, “The Battle of The Boyne 1690” by Jan Van Huchtenbburg 1647 – 1733. King Janes II was defeated by William of Orange. After the Battle, James fled first to Dublin and then to France. William, King of England, Scotland & Ireland reigned until his death in 1702. The battle is remembered in Northern Ireland every year on July 12th. Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland- “A truly sumptuous restaurant in an elegant Georgian house; Patrick Guilbaud has run it for over 35 years

Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland: “A truly sumptuous restaurant in an elegant Georgian house; Patrick Guilbaud has run it for over 35 years. Accomplished, original cooking uses luxurious ingredients and mixes classical French cooking with modern techniques. Dishes are well-crafted and visually stunning with a superb balance of textures and flavours” — The Michelin Guide, http://www.viamichelin.com/web/Restaurant/Dublin-D2-Patrick_Guilbaud-35n13bv

 

“Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud holds two Michelin stars, in addition to virtually all top national and international restaurant awards.  This bright, elegant restaurant, situated in an 18th Century Georgian townhouse, adjoins the five-star Merrion Hotel.  Patrick  Guilbaud created his restaurant in 1981, now established as a centre of fine dining for over thirty years… the cuisine is contemporary Irish with classical roots.  Patrick Guilbaud’s pursuit of excellence can be seen in the delicious, immaculately presented dishes, prepared from the finest Irish produce in season.  Service is equally meticulous, combining efficient French decorum with discreet Irish charm, ensuring the delivery of an impeccable dining experience.  Everything is made on the premises, from the wonderful selection of breads to the petit fours… signature dishes include lobster ravioli, roast challans duck for two and assiette gourmande au chocolat… Patrick Guilbauds has an extensive wine list, which includes many fine wines, to delight the most fastidious and discerning connoisseur.” — http://www.ireland.com/what-is-available/food-and-drink/restaurants/

 

A first course of Annagassan Blue Lobster Boudin with Green Apple Jus accompanied by 2017 Chablis, Domain Servin, Vielles Vignes, Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

A first course of Annagassan Blue Lobster Boudin with Green Apple Jus accompanied by 2017 Chablis, Domain Servin, Vielles Vignes, Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

A first course of Aubergine Baked with Mellow Spices, Cepe Biscuit, Ardsallagh Goats Cheese, accompanied by 2017 Chablis, Domain Servin, Vielles Vignes, Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

A first course of Aubergine Baked with Mellow Spices, Cepe Biscuit, Ardsallagh Goats Cheese, accompanied by 2017 Chablis, Domain Servin, Vielles Vignes, Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

Your blogger in the bar between courses at Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Your blogger in the bar between courses at Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

A main course of Truffled Chicken “Tourte” with Foie Gras, Port, Périgord Truffle(a specialty of the chef, not on the regular menu) accompanied by 2014 Savigny-Les-Beaune “Ez Connardises”, Domaine Françoise Andre , Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud

A main course of Truffled Chicken “Tourte” with Foie Gras, Port, Périgord Truffle (a specialty of the chef, not on the regular menu) accompanied by 2014 Savigny-Les-Beaune “Ez Connardises”, Domaine Françoise Andre , Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

A main course of Grilled Wild Halibut, Violet Artichoke Fricassé, Roasted Bone Jus, accompanied by 2014 Savigny-Les-Beaune “Ez Connardises”, Domaine Françoise Andre , Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

A main course of Grilled Wild Halibut, Violet Artichoke Fricassé, Roasted Bone Jus, accompanied by 2014 Savigny-Les-Beaune “Ez Connardises”, Domaine Françoise Andre , Restaurant Patrick Guilbaud, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.

 

Eat local: The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

The Winding Stair Bookshop & Café became a famous Dublin landmark in the 1970s and 1980s and is named after the Yeats poem and in honor of its winding staircase (from the ground floor bookshop to the upstairs restaurant)

The Winding Stair Bookshop & Café became a famous Dublin landmark in the 1970s and 1980s and is named after the Yeats poem and in honor of its winding staircase (from the ground floor bookshop to the upstairs restaurant)

 

On our first night in Dublin, before attending a performance at the nearby iconic Irish Theatre, The Abbey Theatre, we dined early at The Winding Stair, highly recommended by an American friend (now living in Norway) who has had many business trips to Dublin where he was introduced to many local favorite restaurants.  We thoroughly enjoyed our meal, with a friend from the ship, and regret that we missed dessert and after dinner drinks due to our appointment at the theatre.

“The Winding Stair Bookshop & Café became a famous Dublin landmark in the 1970s and 1980s.  Named after the Yeats poem, and in honour of its winding staircase, it is perfectly located, overlooking the river Liffey, with an iconic view of the Ha’penny bridge.  As a popular meeting place for writers, musicians and artists, it was a well known hub for debate and creativity with many poems written, novels penned and movies shot within its walls.  When its closure was announced in 2005, there were mutterings about the end of an era, but in 2006, Elaine Murphy brought this much-loved spot back to life as a restaurant, championing seasonal, Irish produce.  The bookshop, located on the ground floor, was retained, as were many of the old bookshelves, photos and memories.  The room retains its timeless charm with stripped wood tables and floors, and Bentwood café chairs.  The old girders give a nod to its past as a tweed loom and the view remains as quintessentially Dublin as ever.

 

The Winding Stair Bookshop & Café dining room on the floor above the bookshop overlooks the River Liffey and the Ha’penny Bridge, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

The Winding Stair Bookshop & Café dining room on the floor above the bookshop overlooks the River Liffey and the Ha’penny Bridge, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

A shared first course was a huge platter of many local smoked fish with Irish bread and butter – delicious!, The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

A shared first course was a huge platter of many local smoked fish with Irish bread and butter – delicious!, The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

Another first course (also shared) was an excellent potted crab served with toasted Irish bread, The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

Another first course (also shared) was an excellent potted crab served with toasted Irish bread, The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

“The food is good, old-fashioned home cooking, with produce sourced from artisans within the island.  The beer list focuses on local and international micro breweries with an emphasis on good food, matched beers and ales.  The wine list is extensive and also aims to showcase some of the new and emerging stellar boutique wine makers from the new and old worlds.  We aim to be a restaurant devoid of bells and whistles, with food cooked by chefs devoid of ego and served by warm, friendly professionals with a passion for their business.  We hope we have succeeded! “ — https://winding-stair.com

 

A main course of pork belly, The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

A main course of pork belly, The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

A main course of fresh, local salmon with roe and zucchini and mashed potatoes

A main course of fresh, local salmon with roe and zucchini and mashed potatoes

 

A main course of a pot of steamed local mussels, clams and crab meat served with chips (called French Fries in the US), The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

A main course of a pot of steamed local mussels, clams and crab meat served with chips (called French Fries in the US), The Winding Stair, Dublin, Republic of Ireland

 

Legal Notices: All photographs copyright © 2019 by Richard C. Edwards. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.  Permission to link to this blog post is granted for educational and non-commercial purposes only.